Definition of cut in line in English:

cut in line

phrase

North American
  • Push into a line of people in order to be served or dealt with before one's turn.

    • ‘We assume our next guest won't be cutting in line either.’
    • ‘And the question is, should we set up a system which encourages people to cut in line in front of millions of others to come here?’
    • ‘Not only that, anyone else in their party also gets to cut in line and get great seats as well.’
    • ‘Southerners are the most likely to put their elbows on the table at mealtime, but they are the least likely to cut in line and the most likely to use courtesy titles.’
    • ‘A person has to think twice before cutting in line at the bank, or berating an incompetent waiter.’
    • ‘A player behind them in the points race immediately cuts in line for next year by winning any single event.’
    • ‘If the guy who cuts in line sheepishly smiles and explains that he must satisfy his pregnant wife's pastry craving, lest she kill him, you will be more likely to admire, not curse, his chutzpah.’
    • ‘Perhaps we should ask ourselves why 50 years ago the top problems in America's public schools were: talking out of turn, chewing gum, making noise, running in halls, cutting in line, dress code infractions, and littering.’
    • ‘Because they were sweet little old ladies, neither me nor the other lady said anything to them about cutting in line.’
    • ‘Right now, you might want to be careful about cutting in line in front of a middle-aged woman.’