Definition of curling stone in English:

curling stone

noun

  • A large, polished, circular stone with an iron handle on top, used in the game of curling.

    stone
    • ‘A curling stone with the date 1551 etched on it was found in the bottom of a pond near Dunblane in Scotland.’
    • ‘But while he stayed up watching, Mark used our digital camera to take a photograph of a flower and superimpose the winning position of the curling stones that won us the gold medal.’
    • ‘Curling is suitably Scottish, it is egalitarian, apart from the curling stones it does not require a huge financial outlay and it can be played by people of all ages.’
    • ‘‘It's the type of granite used to make curling stones - blue hone,’ he said.’
    • ‘‘Everyone,’ he wrote, daubing his ruddy cheeks with Glenmorangie aftershave, ‘came with their personal curling stones, many of which had been in the same family for several generations and showed the smooth wear of long use.’’
    • ‘A curling stone will not go to the bottom by itself, nor will you, if you don't do something on the way.’
    • ‘Having survived the bobsled, safely negotiated the downhill course, and learned how to heft and somewhat deftly slide a curling stone, I've come to better appreciate what it takes to become an Olympic athlete.’
    • ‘There she was, a curling stone's throw away from an Olympic gold medal.’
    • ‘There was a woman whose greatest achievement has been to release an effective curling stone at a crucial moment.’
    • ‘On the surrounding streets, family-run restaurants served traditional lamb stew, tripe soup and potato röstis as big as curling stones.’
    • ‘No one is really sure where the first curling stone was thrown.’
    • ‘Yesterday, Murray's grandson proudly displayed publicly for the first time his grandfather's gold medal and the curling stones he used to make sporting history.’
    • ‘Sheffield is literally dominated by the Centre of Popular Music, two metallic rotundas that resemble giant curling stones.’
    • ‘The adventurous can squeeze into a bobsled for an icy ride down Park City's Utah Olympic Park track, while the curious can even learn the art of sliding a curling stone in Ogden.’
    • ‘To keep pace with the rising demand in curling stones, it received permission in 2001 to cart 1,500 tons of granite off of Ailsa Craig.’
    • ‘The island is also one of the few sources of micro-granite, a form of granite solid enough for the manufacture of curling stones.’
    • ‘But he does have a curling stone which he discovered at the scene many years ago.’
    • ‘He said academic debate over the motion of curling stones dated back to at least 1920, when one of the first studies was published in the scientific journal Nature.’
    • ‘The team's coach left a video will where he asks for two key things: that his ashes are to be placed in a curling stone and that the boys are to get the team back together and, this time, go all the way, putting their coach's stone ‘on the button.’’
    • ‘About 250 years ago curlers discovered that the granite on Ailsa Craig made perfect curling stones.’

Pronunciation:

curling stone

/kərliNG ˌstōn/