Definition of cure in English:

cure

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Relieve (a person or animal) of the symptoms of a disease or condition.

    ‘he was cured of the disease’
    figurative ‘centuries of science have not cured us of our superstitions’
    • ‘Many's the baby in arms was cured of the thrush and many's the old man was cured of the ringworm in a public house snug by the genuine and original faith healers who would receive a bottle of stout as payment.’
    • ‘I will make sure you are cured of whatever that blackguard did to you!’
    • ‘David found himself the subject of a phenomenon as he was unexplainably cured of the Crohn's disease with which he suffered for 14 years while on a trip to Medjugorje.’
    • ‘A Swindon woman who says she was cured of severe back pain by a bracelet was so impressed with her return to health that she has now abandoned a career as a driving instructor to sell them full-time.’
    • ‘Marta's path to becoming a healer began when, as a child, she believed she was cured of a paralysis through prayer.’
    • ‘Many go to visit it and there are stories of people being cured of serious ailments because they had the faith to do their religious practice in this place.’
    • ‘The girl is cured of her sickness, leading one to believe that perhaps all she needed was some physical contact.’
    • ‘And the mysterious opening sequence, in which a teenage boy is cured of his stammer by a hypnotist, eludes explanation and classification.’
    • ‘Her small son was cured of reflux, which he had since birth.’
    • ‘But I think I am finally cured of my Floyd fascination.’
    • ‘One of our conclusions at the closing of this conference could very well be that after the digital revolution we are all cured of our techno-phobia.’
    • ‘Most English historians were cured of such flatulent emotion by the carnage of the first world war, the desolation of the great slump and the perilously tight margin of victory in the second world war.’
    • ‘In some cases, they can completely cure the patient of the illness.’
    • ‘He says that he was cured of them in 1990 and there is no reason to doubt this.’
    • ‘As a side-effect, I was also cured of my desire for self-abuse, and my craving for fingernails.’
    • ‘But if I'd hoped that somehow our shared experience that night had gone both ways, I was soon cured of that fantasy.’
    • ‘I am cured of my bout of tonsillitis and i am now fighting fit, but none the less it has been a tough few days.’
    • ‘Now 31, their son is completely cured of autism.’
    • ‘However I'm not cured of the wretched cold and cough that have been my companions for over a week now.’
    • ‘And even patients whose hearts beat irregularly all the time can be cured about 75 percent of the time.’
    heal, restore to health, make well, make better, restore, rehabilitate, treat successfully
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Eliminate (a disease, condition, or injury) with medical treatment.
      ‘this technology could be used to cure diabetes’
      • ‘There, children died of diseases that are easily cured in the world outside.’
      • ‘When you're first diagnosed, it's likely you'll be interested in treatments that cure cancer.’
      • ‘Having spent much of her life until she was 40 as an invalid, travel miraculously cured her ailments.’
      • ‘They have seen medications alleviate pain, cure infections, and diminish anxiety.’
      • ‘A warm tingle seemed to have sparked in my every cell; my headache was suddenly miraculously cured.’
      • ‘If the cancer has spread to other parts of your body, treatment will not cure the cancer.’
      • ‘When my flatmate told me about it, my headache was instantly cured!’
      • ‘He claims his vitamin therapy can even cure cancer.’
      • ‘There is no available medical treatment that immediately cures bronchopulmonary dysplasia.’
      • ‘Tribal peoples have various applications of medicinal/common plants to cure this ailment.’
      • ‘Faith healers cure illness by prayer or touch.’
      • ‘He died after a second bone marrow transplant could not cure the disease.’
      • ‘Her diagnosis is spot on; her holistic therapy has already cured all my ills.’
      • ‘This goes to show that correct homoeopathic treatment not only cures the disease, but also restores health at a lower cost.’
      • ‘If colorectal cancer is found early enough, it can usually be cured by surgery.’
      • ‘We win every time we create a new job or cure an old ailment.’
      • ‘The lesions are widespread and cannot be cured by surgery or embolization.’
      • ‘Who knows, maybe we might have even cured AIDS, or landed on the moon by now!’
      • ‘At least two to four procedures should be applied daily until the illness is completely cured.’
      • ‘But this is Hollywood, and no one's claiming to cure cancer here.’
    2. 1.2Solve (a problem)
      ‘stopping foreign investment is no way to cure the fundamental problem’
      • ‘In most of the cases we're not actually curing the problems, we're finding ways around them.’
      • ‘I also remembered how the council cured the problem of the starlings and the thought that this could be applied to the people who insist on depositing this gum everywhere crossed my mind.’
      • ‘We discussed why neither the old-time remedy of traditional reform nor the wonder drug of vouchers is likely to cure this problem.’
      • ‘And I think the best way to cure that problem is to show them some results.’
      • ‘The law will not even cure the problem that inspired it.’
      • ‘A lot of money has been spent on traffic management schemes but none of it has cured the problem.’
      • ‘I believe that returning to the tradition is part of the way to cure the ethical problem.’
      • ‘But the tendency is then to think that we've cured the problem.’
      • ‘They may have gone some way to cure the traffic problem in the village with the new ramps, but what about the roads themselves?’
      • ‘This hasn't cured the problem, only helped in moving it to another area.’
      • ‘It looked as though new glow plugs had cured the starting problem but this morning, after standing out all night, it was just as difficult to get the darn thing going as it was before.’
      • ‘Unless you have a permanent device I don't think you can cure the problem.’
      • ‘Maybe the small scale man on a bicycle, if not curing the problem completely, can certainly help improve matters.’
      • ‘But clearly the very deep sickness in the system itself is not so easily cured.’
      • ‘The money will help to cure the flooding problem and will also ensure that the road surface water from the Carlow road will also be piped.’
      • ‘Not only do they fail to cure the problems they are hired to solve; they make the problems worse.’
      • ‘In the past, victims of severe blushing were prescribed beta-blockers or anti - depressants, or offered counselling, none of which cured the problem.’
      • ‘Making sure that waiting times are genuinely cut won't cure all the problems, but it would help.’
      • ‘Nothing up to this point has cured what was not in the written document.’
  • 2Preserve (meat, fish, tobacco, or an animal skin) by various methods such as salting, drying, or smoking.

    ‘some farmers cured their own bacon’
    ‘home-cured ham’
    • ‘Their flesh was cured and preserved into amulets.’
    • ‘But when you move up there are other things to do with eggs and cured meat.’
    • ‘It took her a few days to clean and cure the skins properly and salvage enough to do anything useful with them.’
    • ‘They didn't go empty handed, they brought tea, sugar, home-made bread, eggs, home cured bacon and twist tobacco.’
    • ‘Everything except the bacon is our own, and next year we hope to cure some pork for bacon so we'll be able to do it all ourselves.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, he has called on tobacco farmers to use electricity to cure their tobacco and not timber because depletion of trees would cause harm to the environment.’
    • ‘Poorly cured skins of some darkly furred animal clothed it, adding to its emanating body odor, which attracted a small swarm of flies.’
    • ‘Regular pancetta is cured not smoked, and it is rolled into a sausage-like shape.’
    • ‘Another gripe is salt levels - fractionally higher in some organic cured meats, and mayonnaise, than in their non-organic counterparts.’
    • ‘Serve with salad, gherkins and cold sliced cured meats and ham.’
    • ‘But don't overlook other cuts of meat on offer, from boned and rolled roasts to fillets and cured bacon.’
    • ‘Around three million Melton Mowbray pies, which contain pork rather than cured meat, are made in the Leicestershire borough every year.’
    • ‘It's used for curing meat, and theoretically renders it safe to eat even without cooking.’
    • ‘Pork was cured with salt and became ham or bacon.’
    • ‘Overall, 20 gold medals went to Irish companies submitting cured meats, ice cream jams, chutneys, coffees chocolates and smoked fish.’
    • ‘The noun ‘pickle’ is also applied to the mixture of salt, saltpetre, and spices used to cure meats such as ham and bacon.’
    • ‘Out of one oven came a complete mini-pumpkin, the hollow inside filled with rice, chestnuts and cured meat.’
    • ‘Safely refreeze cured meats that are still cold to the touch (40 degrees or less).’
    • ‘This includes luncheon meats and smoked ham which are cured or contain preservatives.’
    • ‘We took a spin on the classic, restaurant-style wrapped filet by crusting a roast with two cured meats - bacon and prosciutto.’
    preserve, smoke, salt, dry, kipper, pickle
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Harden (rubber, plastic, concrete, etc.) after manufacture by a chemical process such as vulcanization.
      • ‘It can also make the difference between success and failure in controlling evaporation between placing and curing the concrete.’
      • ‘The lamp source is selected to provide the appropriate wavelength range of light to cure the material.’
      • ‘Some products are hemp-fused, which means the rubber is cured directly onto a hemp fabric.’
      • ‘There are two types of UV curing systems: flood curing and spot curing.’
      • ‘Synthetic rubber erasers are vulcanized (cooked under pressure) to cure the rubber, but vinyl erasers skip this part.’
      • ‘Early in 1942 cured natural rubber from the plantation was loaded on to planes.’
      • ‘It was left steeping in vats or ‘black pits’ and was mixed with layers of oak bark which cured the material.’
      • ‘The sandwich structure is then heated to cure the resin.’
      • ‘The second exposure stage is further performed to cure the resin in the ultra-violet radiation system.’
      • ‘The lab can make the chips with $30 bottles of rubber, an ultraviolet light to create molds and a convection oven to cure the rubber.’
      • ‘Because the big thing about the large reactors is, you have to pour concrete, and you have to cure the concrete.’
      • ‘A process for making the deflection member comprises curing a coating of a liquid photosensitive resin supported by a forming surface through a mask having a pattern of transparent and opaque regions.’
      • ‘Alum was used to cure leather and fix dyes in cloth as well as for medicinal purposes.’
      • ‘When latex gloves are manufactured, chemicals, curing agents, and accelerators are added to give gloves these desired properties.’
      • ‘Waxes are not usually used to cure base concrete, but brooming to expose the aggregate surface removes the wax.’
      • ‘The latex films or coatings may be cured at ambient temperatures or may be thermally cured.’
      • ‘In addition to the lengthy hand lay-up of the materials, there is the use of an autoclave to cure the epoxy resin.’
      • ‘After sufficient curing the new grout should be sealed with a good penetrating sealer.’
      • ‘Oftentimes this involves using man lifts, which can have trouble maneuvering over curing materials like polyethylene plastic sheets or burlap-bonded plastic coverings.’
      • ‘Goodyear noticed a tiny line of perfectly cured rubber on the edge of the piece.’
    2. 2.2[no object]Undergo curing by a chemical process.
      • ‘While the garlic is curing, transplant ‘Long Keeper’ tomatoes.’
      • ‘They were clamped in place whilst the resin cured by screwing in bolts.’
      • ‘The runway was originally scheduled to be opened this month, but problems with the top coat of emulsion not curing properly meant the job had to be done again - though at no cost to the government.’
      • ‘Olives are not edible, green or ripe, and must be treated with lye and/or cured in brine or dry salt before being edible.’
      • ‘‘On top of that all our work carries a five year guarantee and the only inconvenience will be the loss of your bath for 48 hours while the new surface is curing,’ he stated.’
      • ‘Both types expand and harden as the chemical mixture cures.’
      • ‘Concrete's strength develops as it cures, and that process is usually acknowledged to begin at the time of initial set.’
      • ‘As lime plaster cures, the calcium hydroxide in the mix slowly reacts with carbon dioxide in the air.’
      • ‘We had to drive over rice to get here, laid out on the road to dry or cure or some other food processing I could not make out in the squall of information they gave me.’
      • ‘Light curing cyanoacrylate adhesives are based on ethyl cyanoacrylate technology, which cures in the presence of a weak base, such as water.’
      • ‘If you want to braid your softneck crop, allow the tops to wilt for 2 to 3 days and then braid them tightly and allow to finish curing.’
      • ‘Now the builder simply waits for the epoxy to cure to a strong, translucent finish.’
      • ‘After curing, tubers will keep for several months without sprouting if kept in complete darkness at 40 to 45 degrees and high humidity.’
      • ‘Thermosets flow during molding and then cure or harden irreversibly.’
      • ‘Stacking the slabs risks both a proper bond between the first and second slabs and possible slab curl from the top section curing faster than the underside, to mention just two potential damages.’
      • ‘Say you have two cylinders that cure at different constant temperatures as shown in Figure 2.’
      • ‘Electronic potting components in devices made in high volumes cannot use a silicone that cures slowly, because that extra processing time means higher costs.’

noun

  • 1A substance or treatment that cures a disease or condition.

    ‘the search for a cure for the common cold’
    • ‘Human instinct tells me that the search for a cure for all human diseases will never end.’
    • ‘It would be wonderful to find the route to cures for these tragic diseases.’
    • ‘It is a very important step in beginning the basic research that needs to be done before we can approach treatments and cures.’
    • ‘Even today there are Shamanic practices and rituals performed, and Medicine Men dispense ancient cures for many disease processes.’
    • ‘This paper shows clearly that patients' moral concerns and the demands of their social roles are often more important for them than the alleviation of symptoms or the cure of disease.’
    • ‘It is our goal to find treatments and possibly a cure for this rare, life-threatening disease that robs children of their adulthood.’
    • ‘That's true, they are not cures but they are treatments.’
    • ‘It could bring better treatments, even cures for diseases that cause a lot of pain and death to millions of people.’
    • ‘If until now hope has come from your expectation of a cure, then ending your treatment might seem like giving up hope.’
    • ‘That is, for regimens with the same drugs, more treatment means more cures, and vice versa.’
    • ‘Years of hard work remains to be done before the basic research of today can become viable treatments and cures tomorrow.’
    • ‘We started out looking for clues to a cure for Alzheimer's disease.’
    • ‘Supernatural diseases require supernatural cures, which often involve consultation with a dead relative, who intervenes with the gods or with powers of Nature to restore health.’
    • ‘Pharmaceutical companies often fund research that leads to cures and treatments for diseases.’
    • ‘A medical cure for this disease is unlikely to emerge for some time because of the complexity of the disorder.’
    • ‘Although this knowledge is not useful for predictive testing in unaffected individuals, since a cure for Alzheimer's disease is not yet available, it may help guide treatment.’
    • ‘If we do, we shall be foreclosing the possibilities of discoveries that began decades earlier and ultimately may lead to major treatments or even a cure.’
    • ‘Money that could be directed at researching cures and treatments for disease is being re-directed to provide extra security for existing research.’
    • ‘Although the media have suggested that the map of the genome will lead to immediate cures for many diseases, scientists remain guarded about the content of the first draft and its clinical implications.’
    • ‘Therefore, waiting for the treatment to produce a cure is a common practice.’
    remedy, curative, medicine, medication, medicament, restorative, corrective, antidote, antiserum
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Restoration to health.
      ‘he was beyond cure’
      • ‘Cancer patients beyond cure are frequently used to set the defining standard for terminal illness.’
      • ‘Both patients and their physicians are willing to accept a high risk of toxicity if there is a definite chance of cure.’
      • ‘Persistence of atypical organisms has also been documented after clinical cure.’
      • ‘Tissue biopsy may be required for definitive diagnosis, and surgical resection for definitive cure.’
      • ‘If the tumor has already metastasized before local therapy is administered, cure is impossible.’
      • ‘This would minimize toxic effects while maximizing the chance of cure.’
      • ‘There was also a 1.7-times higher chance of cure in the fluticasone group than in the placebo group.’
      • ‘Trials to date show similar rates of clinical cure in common respiratory infections.’
      • ‘Henry was probably beyond hope of cure after receiving his wound in the neck at the second battle of St Albans in 1456.’
      • ‘Spas have always been as much about recreation and socializing as about medical cure - think of Bath.’
      • ‘Future studies should help clarify the most effective regimens and methods to confirm cure.’
    2. 1.2A solution to a problem.
      ‘the cure is to improve the clutch operation’
      • ‘I particularly liked his cure for sea-sickness: sit under a tree.’
      • ‘And the will to fight is the antidote to despair, the cure for cynicism, and the answer to those faces looking back at me from those photographs on my desk.’
      • ‘In all the research and all the websites in the world, I cannot find any offers of a cure or solution.’
      • ‘They can be carefully picked or rubbed off but, since the real problem is the slow growth of the host shrub, the best cure is to feed and mulch the shrub, improving its vigour and helping it to outgrow the lichen.’
      • ‘None of these thoughts are total cures or solutions, but I hope there is some value in them.’
      • ‘The best hope for a cure lies in the open, honest debate that would spring from wholehearted acceptance of the priesthood of all believers.’
  • 2The process of curing rubber, plastic, or other material.

  • 3A Christian minister's pastoral charge or area of responsibility for spiritual ministry.

    ‘a benefice involving the cure of souls’
    • ‘A prelate is that man, whatsoever he be, that hath a flock to be taught of him; whosoever he be that hath cure of souls.’
    • ‘He studied the area for 50 years and once famously described it as ‘a breathing space for the cure of souls’.’
    • ‘On the other hand I am the one sharing the bishop's cure of souls here, with responsibility to do what I can to instil sound teaching and believing.’
    • ‘All chapters and other benefices without cure of souls were now abolished.’
    • ‘He chose to reside in his see, where he disciplined his clergy, reformed religious houses, and took the cure of souls seriously.’
    1. 3.1A parish.

Origin

Middle English (as a noun): from Old French curer (verb), cure (noun), both from Latin curare take care of from cura care The original noun senses were care, concern, responsibility in particular spiritual care (hence cure). In late Middle English the senses medical care and successful medical treatment arose, and hence remedy.

Pronunciation:

cure

/kyo͝or/

Definition of curé in English:

curé

noun

  • A parish priest in a French-speaking country or region.

    • ‘They might well disagree with his Catholic specificities, like the curé's belief in transubstantiation, but they wouldn't want to take issue with them.’
    • ‘At the base of the Catholic church were approximately 50,000 parish priests (curés) and their assistants, the curates.’
    • ‘The tax collector from the village of Haveluy, whom we met earlier during his confrontation with the local curé, provides a practical example of this combination of religious conviction with anticlericalism.’
    • ‘He further observed: ‘In no sense is it true to say that the life of the curé of Ambricourt is an imitation of its divine model; rather it is a repetition and a picturing forth of that life.’’
    • ‘Primary school teachers were monitored by curés, who sent reports to their bishops, who in turn gave them to the educational authorities.’
    • ‘His fine tomb for its curé is a good example of the theatrical style that he brought to monumental sculpture from the family's decorative tradition.’
    • ‘In one scene, a curé sitting in a Parisian bus beside a drunken fireman is suddenly transformed into a naked woman whose honour is protected only by a Bible.’
    • ‘Everything has followed-on ‘inevitably’: the firelight, the curé's physical placement in the setting, our knowledge that he is a sick man, unable to digest food and semi-starved - everything.’
    • ‘In return bishops and curés would receive government stipends.’
    • ‘Their stance was reinforced by a royal edict of 1782 which apparently brought an end to the so-called ‘revolt of the curés’.’

Origin

French, from medieval Latin curatus (see curate).

Pronunciation:

curé

/kyo͝or/