Definition of curb in US English:

curb

noun

  • 1North American A stone or concrete edging to a street or path.

  • 2A check or restraint on something.

    ‘curbs on the powers of labor unions’
  • 3A type of bit that is widely used in western riding. In English riding it is usually only used with a snaffle as part of a double bridle.

  • 4A swelling on the back of a horse's hock, caused by spraining a ligament.

verb

[with object]
  • 1Restrain or keep in check.

    ‘she promised she would curb her temper’
    • ‘But it hasn't curbed my appetite… it's almost like it's been sent into overdrive.’
    • ‘When she's not curbing her enthusiasm, where does she hang her hat?’
    • ‘Besides, does anyone think youth policies will curb wage inflation among players?’
    • ‘In order to curb inflation, money growth must fall below growth in economic output.’
    • ‘The club has disinfection mats in place to curb the spread of Foot and Mouth disease.’
    • ‘He congratulated the police and council on working effectively together to curb anti-social behaviour.’
    • ‘In short, critics say, it could mean a return to the undisciplined days of a decade ago, before many governments had to curb runaway spending to qualify for the euro.’
    • ‘Fearing rampant speculation, the government has ordered banks to curb lending for property investment.’
    • ‘He also stated that the government was trying to produce a single regulation to curb smuggling across the country.’
    • ‘The tobacco companies offer the perfect illustration of the ways that corporations can effectively curb discussions about their products.’
    • ‘Surely there's a way to curb smoking without seriously hampering such businesses.’
    • ‘Worries over job security will curb consumer spending.’
    • ‘The experts and the central bank will discuss possible ways to curb lending growth.’
    • ‘The commission was hearing submissions on ways to curb the spread of HIV in prison.’
    • ‘They are the first steps in action to curb anti-social behaviour and are voluntary.’
    • ‘At one extreme governments brought in new laws to curb what they saw as seditious journalism.’
    • ‘Action is being demanded to curb the spread of advertising posters in Bolton.’
    • ‘But he also needs the cooperation of the people in curbing the menace.’
    • ‘Two citizen organizations are working to curb the excesses of commercialism in our society.’
    • ‘Certain good fats actually help curb your appetite, thus speeding up weight loss.’
    restrain, hold back, keep back, hold in, repress, suppress, fight back, bite back, keep in check, check, control, keep under control, rein in, keep a tight rein on, contain, discipline, govern, bridle, tame, subdue, stifle, smother, swallow, choke back, muzzle, silence, muffle, strangle, gag
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Restrain (a horse) by means of a curb.
      ‘both men were instinctively curbing their horses’
      • ‘It didn't help that his holographic partner, a die-hard environmentalist, kept urging him to clean up after the mess; curbing a horse is not easy to do.’
      • ‘The educational authorities have moved swiftly to curb this bucking bronco, whose 100 percent pass rates were the wonder of the land.’
      • ‘The raw energy, just curbed by their athletic riders, of the Parthenon horses comes to us straight from the ice age, from the dawn of humanity.’
  • 2US Lead (a dog being walked) near the curb to urinate or defecate, in order to avoid soiling buildings, sidewalks, etc.

Origin

Late 15th century (denoting a strap fastened to the bit): from Old French courber ‘bend, bow’, from Latin curvare (see curve).

Pronunciation

curb

/kərb//kərb/