Definition of crimson in English:



  • Of a rich deep red color inclining to purple.

    ‘she blushed crimson with embarrassment’
    • ‘The cherries were staining her lips an enticing crimson colour, and Cary longed to lean across the table to kiss the juice away.’
    • ‘Their eyes have turned a most fearsome crimson colour, and a feeling of malice is apparent in their company.’
    • ‘Her jaw literally dropped at the sight of the delicate pedals of the crimson flowers.’
    • ‘She then tucked her chemise deeper within her crimson bodice in an unsuccessful attempt to push her chest further up.’
    • ‘Hanging in equal distances along the deep crimson walls were large paintings of bold men dressed in fine robes.’
    • ‘He succeeded in breeding a particularly bright crimson variety of the flower.’
    • ‘Kumma pulled away from her, hiding the deep crimson colour of his face.’
    • ‘The blood shone brightly, tainting her with its crimson colour.’
    • ‘A deep crimson ribbon lay plaited through her hair, and I kept an eye on it as it bounced along at the small of her back.’
    • ‘The stage was hung with deep crimson curtains and had a miniscule orchestra pit directly in front and under it.’
    • ‘The purple and crimson gem is the only known diamond of these colours.’
    • ‘I watched, paralyzed, as the blood soaked the once white sheets, giving them a rich crimson color.’
    • ‘The walls were paneled wood, painted with a rich crimson color and decorated by hanging tapestries.’
    • ‘The blood from the bodies had stained the carpet a beautiful crimson colour.’
    • ‘The flowering heads bear countless minute crimson flowers, which eventually yield seeds smaller than a pinhead.’
    • ‘The tree was covered in deep crimson flowers and filled with bright red papers.’
    • ‘The stone's value comes from its intense purple and crimson colour.’
    • ‘Weighed down by deep crimson clothes and further hindered by a heavy golden cape, he could barely keep an upright bearing in the sweltering heat of the ocean.’
    • ‘Instead, she was drawn to a deep crimson ribbon, one the color of red-wine, one that she'd never worn.’
    • ‘There were padded, deep crimson chairs all around, and the tables were a patterned shade of light blue.’
    red, reddish, scarlet, vermilion, crimson, blood-red, rose-red, pink, roseate
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  • A rich deep red color inclining to purple.

    • ‘Pick a hue that has complexity, such as this rich crimson, which gives the room depth and drama.’
    • ‘The world around him resonated with the color of the man's eyes, turning everything a deep hue of crimson.’
    • ‘My face was going back to its usual colour - the usual colour of deep crimson whenever I faced Nicole.’
    • ‘I must've blushed crimson, because Chevy laughed a deep booming laugh.’
    • ‘He meticulously lines her lips in a deep shade of crimson, then wipes the colour away and replaces it with an outline of soft pink.’
    • ‘Either way, it's best to make it a day or so in advance to allow the juices to soak completely into the bread and turn it deep crimson.’
    • ‘The artist's palette encompasses earthy, weather worn colours, rich burnished crimsons and flashes of red.’
    • ‘He was awarded with a deep red blush that was almost darker than the deep crimson of her dress.’
    • ‘I made it with some Sicilian blood oranges whose flesh ranges from intensely red to a vivid, shocking crimson.’
    • ‘They watched as the colours of the dunes changed from yellow, to deep crimson, to pink and purple, then finally to the dark black of night.’
    • ‘Blood rains, splatters and gushes and stains: sometimes red, sometimes deep crimson.’
    • ‘Her eyebrows were creased in anger and her usually pale complexion was a deep shade of crimson.’
    • ‘The colour of a young red wine can vary from blackish purple (as in a vintage port, for example) through many hues of crimson to ruby.’
    • ‘Darker-skinned people might consider opting for red, brown, deep purple, golden crimson, or hot pink.’
    • ‘Classic crimson is one Christmas hue that never goes out of style.’
    • ‘He nodded towards my bosoms before turning a deep shade of crimson.’
    • ‘Laughter began to loom in my stomach when my friend blushed to the color of deep crimson.’
    • ‘The beige carpet had been dressed up with a throw rug of deep crimson.’
    • ‘The sun was slipping low into the sky, dying it shades of deep crimson.’
    • ‘Watt bought some red roses for herself and began to make a series of images - folds of material painted in deep crimson, the colour of roses, or of blood.’


  • (of a person's face) become flushed, especially through embarrassment.

    ‘my face crimsoned and my hands began to shake’
    • ‘Realizing she still had the silk robe on, her cheeks crimsoned again and she stripped it off.’
    • ‘David nods, crimsoning at his mistake and finishes washing the infant.’
    • ‘‘Oh, they say everyone has,’ she says, crimsoning.’
    • ‘‘You disgust me,’ Caleb retorted, his face further crimsoning.’
    • ‘Her face crimsoning with fury, Isabella suddenly turned away from her friend and quickened her pace down the road.’
    • ‘His face was crimsoned and he was breathing heavily.’
    • ‘David catches her quick side-glance at him and feels himself crimsoning.’
    • ‘David says this, crimsoning as he realizes he had not saved Viridian's life yet.’
    • ‘Jake smiles while his cheeks crimson at the touch of the young lady.’
    • ‘Sierra crimsoned and picked up a bigger box on the next shelf.’
    • ‘She gives a side-glance at her bonded, crimsoning slightly.’
    • ‘No matter how she blushed or crimsoned, most people who gathered at the Fine Arts Hall seemed to have enjoyed the judge's faux pas.’
    flush, blush, redden, go red, colour, colour up, go pink, crimson, go scarlet, be suffused with colour
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Late Middle English: from obsolete French cramoisin or Old Spanish cremesin, based on Arabic ḳirmizī, from ḳirmiz (see kermes). Compare with carmine.