Main definitions of crew in English

: crew1crew2

crew1

noun

  • 1A group of people who work on and operate a ship, boat, aircraft, spacecraft, or train.

    • ‘The station and crossing are unmanned and the train crew operate the gates.’
    • ‘Currently, most trains are operated with two-person crews - the train operator and the conductor.’
    • ‘A member of the train crew put out a call for medical assistance.’
    • ‘In addition to training the ship's crew, there's the matter of getting the air crews shipshape.’
    • ‘Certain members of the crews of both ships were also decorated.’
    • ‘The latest hold-up involves a new office block for train operating companies, which will include facilities for train crews.’
    • ‘A US Navy crew operated the ship.’
    • ‘Inside, the crew closely followed the team each inch of the way until they reached the escape hatch.’
    • ‘While arranging the charter, they had requested that people of certain ethnic and religious groups not be included in the crews operating this train.’
    • ‘Both members of the crew were killed instantly when the missile hit their aircraft.’
    • ‘A sudden movement like that would have killed the crew of that ship immediately; no one could take that much momentum at one time!’
    • ‘At the High Court in Leeds, Judge Peter Langan ruled the ballot carried out to see if members in the operational train crew wanted to go on strike was unlawful.’
    • ‘The galleon trade provided the first opportunity for native Filipinos to leave the islands as members of the crews aboard the Spanish ships.’
    • ‘One member of the train crew was killed, and two nearby residents asphyxiated from breathing the gas.’
    • ‘Paul, Val and the team will follow the progress of the ship's crew as they continue their Able Seaman training programme.’
    • ‘Once in place, members had the added responsibility of training the international crews on the operation of these systems.’
    • ‘It is thought that most Viking ships probably carried some tents of this type to provide shelter, at least for the more important members of the crew, when the ship was away from home.’
    • ‘The Norwegian ship and its crew did what all seamen would do: rescue others in need at sea.’
    • ‘Did D intend to kill the crew of the aircraft on which he placed a bomb, as well as intending (as he admits) to claim the insurance money on the cargo?’
    • ‘The railway is operated by fully trained crews and is open all day Monday to Friday, running each hour from 10 am to 4 pm.’
    1. 1.1 A group of people working on a ship, aircraft, etc., other than the officers.
      ‘the ship's captain and crew may be brought to trial’
      • ‘The Norwegian freighter has no doctor and only enough food and facilities for 27 officers and crew.’
      • ‘The professionalism of the captain, officers and crew of the Wecoma contributed greatly to the success of the cruise.’
      • ‘Within half an hour, the pirates had assembled all the officers and crew and taken them to the captain's cabin.’
      • ‘I have a tremendous amount of respect for the crew and the officers of the ship who managed to keep us all alive.’
      • ‘We thank the captains, officers and crew of the R.V L' Atalante and the Aguadomar and Caraval scientific teams for their efficient work at sea.’
      • ‘In all the years that I spent in the Navy, I never served with a crew and officers like Seaview's!’
      • ‘All 118 officers and crew inside the submarine died when the pride of the Russian fleet sank after suffering a huge explosion in August last year.’
      • ‘It was an honor to dine at the captain's table, and indeed all the officers and crew were exceptional.’
      • ‘Karla briefed the crew as Pilot Officer Kellogg flew the shuttle to the planet out over the ocean and brought it in to the LZ fast and low to avoid detection.’
      • ‘Aboard were twenty naval officers, a crew of 200, and a scientific staff of five.’
      • ‘They were more than just officers and crew in the same unit, they were family.’
      • ‘The Arizona had been my home; a city on water for her crew and officers.’
      • ‘Her officers and crew, visiting dignitaries, families and friends, toast her health.’
      • ‘So essentially the officers and the crew are eating their way out of the food supplies.’
      • ‘The officers and crews had already been up for some time.’
      • ‘Station Officer Power directed his crew and set up a fire block to prevent the fire spreading further.’
      • ‘During the voyage you will meet the captain, Commander Paul Porter, be entertained by the officers and crew, and given a full tour of HMS York.’
      • ‘For several weeks, Clarkson haunted Bristol waterfront pubs to see how officers recruited their crews.’
      • ‘During the three-day stay in Southampton, officers and crew have been involved in a number of projects in the city.’
      • ‘The building had a small chancel lit by a stained glass window, in memory of the officers and crew lost at sea on HMS Atalanta.’
      sailors, seamen, mariners, hands
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2US The sport of rowing a racing shell.
      • ‘Can we list all of the great high school crew teams in Texas?’
      • ‘His one arena of success lay in rowing crew, setting the stage for a lifelong love of being on water.’
      • ‘Obviously, it's the primary action in many crew and paddling sports.’
      • ‘Crew wasn't a school-sanctioned sport, so it had no money and no truck to haul the new boat to American Lake in Tacoma.’
  • 2A group of people who work closely together.

    ‘an ambulance crew’
    ‘crews of firefighters from neighboring towns were called in’
    • ‘The Bolton Mountain Rescue team and two ambulance crews went to help her.’
    • ‘We invited the media, which was no less than four cameras and three of those news crews and associated media and journalists.’
    • ‘Firefighters and ambulance crews are subjected to attacks in the area.’
    • ‘An incident support officer rushed to the scene, closely followed by a paramedic ambulance crew.’
    • ‘The Humberside police helicopter was put on standby as police, firefighters and ambulance crews attended the scene.’
    • ‘Emergency workers like firefighters, ambulance crews and nurses need to be fully protected.’
    • ‘An ambulance crew and firefighters eventually arrived to cut the shivering dad from the vehicle.’
    • ‘Pete Muckle, Stow fire station officer, said his crew was called to four incidents caused by the storm.’
    • ‘Police, firefighters and ambulance crews were called and four people were taken to Colchester General Hospital with minor injuries.’
    • ‘Fire officers and crews were quick to arrive at the scene yesterday and the immediate area was sealed off.’
    • ‘Firefighters, ambulance crews and police were called to the factory at 10 am.’
    • ‘Plus, retail operations bring the expense of larger staffs, i.e., crews of sales associates to man the stores.’
    • ‘And so when an officer or his crew makes a mistake of this magnitude or proportion, the end state is the same.’
    • ‘It is the latest in a seemingly increasing phenomenon of attacks on ambulance crews and firefighters while on duty.’
    • ‘Camps located in nonurban settings must understand that rural ambulance and emergency crews may be volunteers.’
    • ‘But there is one situation that rescue crews are monitoring very closely.’
    • ‘Officer Raymond said crews faced the death-wish teenagers every time they turned out along a certain stretch of road.’
    • ‘Ade Hurren, station officer, said crews would be distributing the leaflets to all Seymour households this weekend.’
    • ‘Police sealed off the area around the depot and firefighters and ambulance crews were called to the scene.’
    • ‘Residents had called the police who, together with a NSW Ambulance rescue crew, mounted a search in the drain.’
    team, company, unit, party, working party, gang, shift, line-up, squad, force, corps, posse
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1informal, derogatory A group of people associated in some way.
      ‘a crew of assorted computer geeks’
      • ‘A motley crew we looked with our sweets and drink we brought in our selves but they loved it.’
      • ‘I moved into a new place, started playing sports again, and I now have a totally great crew of close friends!’
      • ‘Don't invite your new gang to your old crew's annual end-of-summer outdoor bash.’
      • ‘Oddly enough, when most of my friends and relatives were rooting for Dorothy and her crew, I was on the side of the Witch.’
      • ‘What a motley crew we are - much more so, I say from my experience, than journalists and politicians.’
      • ‘On Soundchambers, this crew of German abstractionists locks together to form a constantly shifting musical triangle.’
      crowd, lot, set, group, circle, band, gang, mob, pack, troop, swarm, herd, posse, company, collection
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2US informal A group of rappers, breakdancers, or graffiti artists performing or operating together.
      • ‘We were all in a break crew called Soul City Rockers at the time.’
      • ‘Roll Deep were Dizzee Rascal's original crew, and musos and critics seem desperate to love them.’
      • ‘Lack of energy and a dearth of hooks adds up to one of the most tepid releases Matthews and his crew have released.’
      • ‘Sometimes, there are benefits to being the third banana in a middle-tier rap crew.’
      • ‘Winners of the ECMA for Alternative Group of the Year, this crew performed following King Konqueror's set.’
      • ‘The urban improvisations of the Stomp crew are set against the rhythms and simple instruments of the tribes of five continents, from Brazil to Botswana.’
      • ‘They were doing music classes all over the UK and wanted to create a hip hop crew.’
      • ‘Scutt follows a crew of Melbourne graffiti artists around for one night.’
      • ‘With the UK swarming with young grime crews and artists; can old skool feel-good music (as Luck calls it) survive?’
      • ‘We had emails from all over the UK to come and interview crews and artists.’
      • ‘Urban Art will feature spray paint pieces in various locations and we will hopefully interview artists and crews in upcoming issues.’
      • ‘The latter's much better, however, and, at over twenty years old, still more than capable of rocking the rock steady crew.’
      • ‘He says rappers at Flow are starting to support each other and to collaborate with artists outside their crew.’
      • ‘The Invisible Spies crew was too busy beatboxing and tagging overpasses to bother picking up any post-'92 hip hop from across the pond.’
      • ‘There's apparently a Cornish hip-hop crew who rap about tractors, although that could just be my mate winding me up.’
      • ‘In some areas if you don't have some sort of a connection to the local gang or crew, you can't tag there, unless they aren't looking.’
      • ‘The usual Jamdown production crew attempt to make hip-hop beats and fail miserably.’
      • ‘Despite much hooting and hollering for a second encore, Casablancas and crew were in all probability far too intoxicated to perform any more songs by that point.’
      • ‘I think the real problem is that these crews are performing together for the first time in the playoffs.’
      • ‘The interactive animated drama, based on the lives of a crew of graffiti artists, attracted almost 40,000 unique user agents to the minisite.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Provide (a craft or vehicle) with a group of people to operate it.

    ‘normally the boat is crewed by 5 people’
    • ‘Every form of sailing imaginable is on offer here, from beginners' dinghy lessons on the lake-like waters of North Sound to fully crewed yachts.’
    • ‘Foreign-built and/or crewed ships were excluded from colonial trade and most exports and imports were to be carried via English and Scottish ports.’
    • ‘In November 2000 they set off for a five-day training run and found themselves crewing the boat into the teeth of a force eight south-westerly gale.’
    • ‘They eventually found two boats, one of them a fishing vessel crewed by Thais which had been seized off Somalia.’
    • ‘Earlier, an attack on an oil tanker rammed by two explosive-laden boats left five sailors and the attackers crewing the boats dead.’
    • ‘It is one thing to buy 105 vehicles at a cost of $750 million, but it is another thing when we do not actually have the people to crew those vehicles.’
    • ‘Once Jenna and Allison had sat down she said, ‘As you know this ship is primarily crewed by the engineering staff, rather than military crew.’’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the only crewed space vehicle in development by the US is the CEV - the Crewed Exploration Vehicle.’
    • ‘Partially disabled, his craft is captured by a huge, whale-like space vessel crewed by a handful of rather unfriendly aliens.’
    • ‘While the airline is not prepared to indicate how much it will cost to hire fully crewed aircraft to keep most of their flights running, aviation experts have indicated that the cost would likely top €500,000 a day.’
    • ‘John Agnew helped to crew the British boat Aera in its dash from Sydney to Hobart harbour’
    • ‘The staff that crewed the vehicles worked for six weeks, on standby 24 hours a day, seven days a week, before they got a week off.’
    • ‘This may mean temporarily moving personnel or vehicles to fire stations that are unable to crew vehicles for various reasons, including sickness.’
    • ‘Craig Alexander and Barry Scott, both 27, realised that crewing expensive yachts under a Caribbean sun offered more than fun.’
    • ‘The ships are crewed by 72 Royal Fleet Auxiliary personnel and there is also provision for 26 Royal Navy personnel for helicopter and weapons systems operations.’
    • ‘His brother Robin, 33, crewed the boat at the last minute and left a pregnant wife to grieve and to bring up a child who will never know his father.’
    • ‘The purpose-built yacht is crewed by four to five professional sailors, out of whom only the skipper is paid a salary.’
    • ‘It is equally unlikely that Irish Ferries' customers care who crews the ships.’
    • ‘And he says it's a classic example of why only Australian-owned and crewed ships should be allowed in Australian waters.’
    • ‘Paramedics have told Scotland on Sunday it is likely that hundreds of lives would be saved each year if ambulances were properly crewed.’
    1. 1.1[no object] Act as a member of a crew, subordinate to a captain.
      ‘I've never crewed for a world-famous yachtsman before’
      • ‘Offspring also crewed with Claude Theiler, Chris Goedhart, Andrew Dove from Guadeloupe and Pedro Jonker from St. Maarten.’
      • ‘But most members of the Liverpool Pedalo Club who crewed with Mark Latham see him in a very different light.’
      • ‘He was supposed to be crewing and he hadn't even met the captain yet.’
      • ‘She spent the summer crewing on a sailboat in Newport.’
      • ‘Roped in to crew for an older friend, they fed me cider until I wobbled.’
      • ‘Won 470 class at U.S. Olympic trials crewing for Katie McDowell.’
      • ‘She had been sold as a slave, and told me she had been crewing as a cabin boy for half a year.’
      • ‘I like to sail and am currently training up my three children to crew, so that I can relax, just sit back and listen to the sea lapping at the boat.’
      • ‘As a weapons systems officer with the ‘Triple Nickel,’ DeBellevue scored his first four aerial victories while crewing with Capt. Steve Ritchie, who became the first Air Force Vietnam War ace.’
      • ‘Noyes, 47, crewed for Krause from 1983 to 1993 and didn't begin driving until 1994.’
      • ‘For two years I had to crew as a deckhand on a trawler so we could keep the business going.’
      • ‘I was asked to crew by the commodore.’
      • ‘Earnhardt compares the chemistry to what he developed with Kirk Shelmerdine, who crewed for four of Earnhardt's championship seasons.’
      • ‘Anna tasted success on the world stage two years ago, when she crewed for her big sister Katie when they were the first all girl boat in the World Championships in Hobart, Tasmania.’
      • ‘So he backpacked across New Zealand, then crewed on a sailboat in the Gulf of Mexico.’
      • ‘There was a welcome return to the fleet of Ian Frith crewing in Deva for the first time since his recent accident.’
      • ‘Ed and Joe got involved with the round-Britain challenge when they crewed for the owners John and Lisa Forbes to bring the yacht to Plymouth.’
      • ‘Emily's success is aided and abetted by her mum, Deirdre, who crews for Emily at all the rides.’
      • ‘Still, Warthen, who also crewed for the Real World season set in Seattle, and Kunitz agree this is the most open cast of any previous episodes.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French creue augmentation, increase feminine past participle of croistre grow from Latin crescere. The original sense was band of soldiers serving as reinforcements; hence it came to denote any organized armed band or, generally, a company of people (late 16th century).

Pronunciation

crew

/kro͞o/

Main definitions of crew in English

: crew1crew2

crew2

British

Pronunciation

crew

/kro͞o/