Definition of crepe in English:


(also crêpe)


  • 1A light, thin fabric with a wrinkled surface.

    [as modifier] ‘a silk crepe blouse’
    • ‘Light and feminine fabrics such as satin crepe tulles and damasks combine with the fabrics found at work and in the masculine world - cottons, sail cloth, denim and poplin.’
    • ‘Flaming pinks, burning oranges, deep turquoise and wild reds were fused together to present a collection of Indo-westerns in fluid, flowing fabrics like georgettes, chiffons and crepes.’
    • ‘But the entire exercise becomes can become strenuous when it is done on crape and georgette sarees, as the material is very fine to work on.’
    • ‘Instead, she has been playing around with contrasting fabrics, mixing heavy wool with silk crepes.’
    • ‘The glittering sapphire fabric, crepe accented with tiny diamantés, highlighted her blue eyes, and pale blonde hair.’
    • ‘The fabric back is a flattened crepe while the front is a shimmery satin weave.’
    • ‘A sleeveless empire line gown with a v-neckline, the silk crepe flowed beautifully into a short train which made her look taller, while the delicate satin band under the empire line helped to accentuate her curves.’
    • ‘Chiffon, organza, shimmering metallic lace, satin, silks and crepes will all play their part.’
    • ‘Satin, organza, chiffon, georgette, tulle, lace, brocades, and crepe are all classic fabrics for bridesmaid dresses.’
    • ‘Giving petite customers a place of their own could help it sell more of those crepe suits and little black dresses.’
    • ‘Look for all-season fabrics like wool gabardine, cotton blends or rayon crepe.’
    • ‘Concentrating on the combination of red and white, the collection in georgettes, crepes, silk, celebrates the spirit of Valentine's Day and youthful vitality.’
    • ‘In the 1920s the calf-length tweed skirt with a crêpe de chine blouse epitomised the British look.’
    • ‘Canton Crepe is a soft crepe woven fabric with small crosswise ribs.’
    • ‘The cargo look remained popular, in three-quarter length pants, a low-slung olive silk crepe skirt, full-length trousers accented with zippers and silk crepe satin shorts.’
    • ‘Crepes and crepe silks are the fashion textiles these days.’
    • ‘I will confess, however, that I ended up wearing the lovely black, crepe coat I had thrown on for warmth and confidence, for most of the evening.’
    1. 1.1Hard-wearing wrinkled rubber, used especially for the soles of shoes.
  • 2A thin pancake.

    • ‘You will need a punchy pudding wine to cope with the chocolate and sticky crunch of Jill's demanding chocolate crêpes and honeycomb cream.’
    • ‘The portobello crêpe comes with grilled mushrooms, mozzarella, roasted potato, and superbly pitched pesto, and is a subtle delight.’
    • ‘This joint Canadian-French production is a lot like a crêpe: simple, sweet and pretty thin.’
    • ‘The blini of ground beef wrapped in a thin crêpe disappeared before I could get a taste of it, so I guess that means it must have been good, right?’
    • ‘She pulled the sleeve back over it and flipped the crêpes.’
    • ‘More generally, cooked in a thin layer in the bottom of a frying pan, a batter makes pancakes or crêpes.’
    • ‘There are also crêpes stuffed with apricot as well as chocolate mousse served in individual crusts.’
    • ‘Stuffed crêpes, prepared in the ‘real’ Russian style, are available with potatoes, meat or cheese.’
    • ‘These are little rice flour crêpes, served hot and stuffed with pork, mushrooms, onion and coriander.’
    • ‘Surely the most well-known take-away treats in Brittany are crêpes, which are impossible to avoid no matter where you go.’
    • ‘In France, batter is transformed into crisp beignets and croquettes, into traditional waffles peculiar to each region, and into smooth, light crêpes.’
    • ‘Use the spatula and slide the crêpe to the edge of the pan and then slide it back again onto the spatula and turn it over.’
    • ‘Using a thin spatula, flip the crape and continue to cook or one minute.’
    • ‘I'd never been to crêperie without ordering crêpes, but this time I wanted to test the kitchen's versatility.’
    • ‘It's not enough to be able to flambée a crêpe without setting fire to the studio - TV cooks should have us salivating on our sofas.’
    • ‘For dessert, he brought us special crêpes with strawberries, dark chocolate, and cream.’
    • ‘In many regions, crêpes are eaten on 2 February, the Feast of the Virgin.’
    • ‘Of course, we had a scallion-and-seafood pancake, a thick, flavorful eggy crêpe that kids can be counted on to devour in the event that everything else on the menu defies their peanut-butter-dependent palates.’
    • ‘While they sampled crêpes and kalamari, we ate the same menu all round Scotland, with a choice of ‘boiled, creamed, chipped or fried’.’
    • ‘In France, Belgium, Holland, even in Italy and Spain, they treat crêpes as everyday snacks.’


Late 18th century: French, from Old French crespe curled, frizzed from Latin crispus.