Definition of craze in English:

craze

noun

  • An enthusiasm for a particular activity or object which appears suddenly and achieves widespread but short-lived popularity.

    ‘the latest craze for bungee jumping’
    • ‘Towards Christmas, expect to see knits which have taken the fashion craze for extravagance the whole way - and why not?’
    • ‘In the world of investment, gold is also highly sought after, but the current craze for this commodity has nothing to do with the festive season.’
    • ‘Instead, huge stages were erected in public places to cater to the local craze for music, particularly dangdut, a local musical genre mixing Arabic and Indian influences.’
    • ‘We speculate that the government may in fact have started the helmet craze for this reason.’
    • ‘A craze for wacky weddings has grown since marriage laws were widened to include a vast range of potential venues.’
    • ‘So perhaps the craze for entering beauty contests is based on some hard-nosed assumptions.’
    • ‘Come to think of it, videocassette tapes never really became very popular, though there was quite a craze for them soon after they were introduced in the market.’
    • ‘I think when the craze for Indian classical music started in the 60s it was a lot more superficial thing than it is now.’
    • ‘The first craze for learning English in Shanghai occurred in the 1860s, according to a paper recently submitted to a Fudan University symposium.’
    • ‘The salon organizers have made prints a special highlight of this year's event, hoping to start a craze for print collecting in China.’
    • ‘Japanese arts and crafts exercised such a hold over European and American imaginations that in the late 19th century there was a craze for everything from fans to porcelain.’
    • ‘The craze for watching football matches triggers a paranoid outburst.’
    • ‘She read a wedding planner for inspiration, and learned about a new craze for hot air balloon weddings.’
    • ‘Thereafter England also enthusiastically embraced the craze for Egyptian antiquities.’
    • ‘Once the craze for motorcycles caught on, manufacturers began unveiling new models capable of higher speeds, better breaking and sporting sleeker designs.’
    • ‘The grading system may put an end to the craze for ranks, but it will open a bee-hive of new problems.’
    • ‘Several business commentators highlighted the importance of television in fueling the craze for space toys and apparel.’
    • ‘When Coco Chanel started the craze for suntans in the 1920s, only those who could afford to head for warmer shores were able to indulge in the new fashion.’
    • ‘While thousands rush to revamp interiors in the ongoing craze for home improvement programmes, more than 2.5 million homes in the UK need substantial repairs.’
    • ‘He also commented on the current craze for Blogs - which he described as online diaries, many of them read only by the writer.’
    fad, vogue, trend, fashion, enthusiasm, passion, infatuation, love, obsession, mania, compulsion, fixation, fetish, weakness, fancy, taste, novelty, whim, fascination, preoccupation, rage
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1usually as adjective crazedWildly insane or excited.

    ‘a crazed killer’
    ‘power-crazed tinpot dictators’
    • ‘He stood at a watch post every day and night, guarding her as if she were some crazed maniac going to destroy the whole city that she lived in.’
    • ‘Some crazed drivers refuse to let children cross the road in safety and insist on driving around them, honking their horns and shaking their fists as they do.’
    • ‘And then, wouldn't you know it, here comes another crazed madman wanting to destroy the world.’
    • ‘He was very small, and looked terrified when four half-starved and dementedly crazed teenagers opened the door and almost burst out, their eyes bulging.’
    • ‘It was like being in a cage while thousands of these crazed fans scraped and clawed at you.’
    • ‘I'm not some crazed person who enjoys being annoyed all the time.’
    • ‘You run into your fair share of flashers, born-again Christian Evangelists and general crazed lunatics.’
    • ‘You were running all over the place like some crazed person.’
    • ‘Avoiding long lines, impossible parking and crazed consumers will help you keep your cool.’
    • ‘People looked at us like we were sex crazed teenagers or something.’
    • ‘This wasn't a movie about crazed sex maniacs or loose women or pregnant girls or the vice rackets.’
    • ‘They follow with the titular track from that album, leaping about the stage like crazed teenagers and thrusting their arms into the air in gestures of defiance.’
    • ‘And then she faded away from me too, becoming a bitter, crazed mother who was determined to stop me from following the path of my father.’
    • ‘He didn't need some crazed girl ruining all his plans.’
    • ‘If religions teach that life after death is better then it is hardly surprising that some crazed followers will actually believe it.’
    • ‘No, the scandal that their daughter was a violent, crazed lunatic would haunt them for however long they chose to stay there.’
    • ‘It was now almost 3 a.m. on a completely darkened road, and some crazed guy is flailing his arms and yelling at them as they pass.’
    • ‘Soon they came upon Blanche, a poor, crazed woman living in the wilds.’
    • ‘Her name would be splashed across the town weekly, her beaming smile belying the sick-to-her-stomach fear that some crazed madman was out there.’
    • ‘They stared at Paige as if she was some crazed person going on a rampage.’
    mad, insane, out of one's mind, deranged, demented, certifiable, lunatic, wild, raving, distraught, berserk, manic, maniac, frenzied, hysterical, psychopathic
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  • 2Produce a network of fine cracks on (a surface)

    ‘the lake was frozen over but crazed with cracks’
    • ‘Recently I picked up a slightly crazed Edwardian wall tile, part of an incomplete design, only to drop it in horror at being asked for €10 a piece.’
    • ‘Tap the shells with the back of a spoon to craze them, then peel.’
    • ‘But to some people, the various stains, scratches, and crazing that accumulate with the passage of time on a concrete countertop aren't blemishes at all but a patina to be valued.’
    • ‘There is no suggestion that that sample panels exhibited crazing or cracking.’
    • ‘True, old wear produces smooth spider web crazing and softened edges.’
    • ‘An authentic example will almost certainly show crazing, similar to that found on old oil paintings.’
    • ‘The works feature bits of architecture, coloured blobs over the top and crazed, raised surfaces of paint, all lovingly laid down on miniature rectangles of MDF.’
    • ‘From a distance, it could be plaster of Paris, but up close there is no mistaking the fine, crazed lines of human skin.’
    • ‘Cleaning and sealing the surface will help prevent further crazing, but the long-term solution is to resurface.’
    1. 2.1no object Develop fine cracks.
      • ‘In this case chemical agents penetrate the plastic, causing swelling, softening, charring, crazing, delamination, blistering, embrittlement, discoloration, dissolving, and ultimate failure.’
      • ‘Its surface had become heavily crazed, making it impossible to examine the specimen, so the balsam was removed with xylene.’
      • ‘Such contact can cause crazing - the development of small cracks - in the material.’
      • ‘In the world where she was most alive, the sun split in the sky, the earth erupted, her body was torn to pieces, her teeth and bones crazed and broken to fragments.’
      • ‘They will cause the plastic to craze with minute cracks.’
      • ‘In addition, Roma found that Makrolon will craze, but the cracks won't propagate all the way through the material.’
      crack, split, fissure, crevice, break, rupture, breach, rift, cleft, slit, chink, gap, cranny, interstice, opening, aperture, rent
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Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘break, produce cracks’): perhaps of Scandinavian origin and related to Swedish krasa ‘crunch’.

Pronunciation

craze

/krāz//kreɪz/