Main definitions of crane in English

: crane1crane2

crane1

noun

  • 1A large, tall machine used for moving heavy objects, typically by suspending them from a projecting arm or beam.

    • ‘With the gantry crane on site, the new turbine is being unloaded and moved to its foundation.’
    • ‘Countless thousands of giant construction cranes dominate the skyline.’
    • ‘A large mobile crane removed the container later on in the day.’
    • ‘Giant cranes were lifting large, mangled steel beams and depositing them onto 18-wheelers.’
    • ‘Another barge also had to be hoisted by crane on to a low loader.’
    • ‘A gantry crane lifts the containers onto the ship.’
    • ‘The company has brought them from a brewery in the Midlands and installed them using a giant crane.’
    • ‘Instrumental in the success of the project was the tallest freestanding tower crane ever erected in Oklahoma.’
    • ‘On any given day there are 10-20 construction cranes on the skyline.’
    • ‘A 200-ton crane then lifts the tree to its new site.’
    • ‘The crane toppled over when a skip of concrete was being lowered to the beach.’
    • ‘Volunteers used an overhead crane that had been left in the space to rig the theatrical lighting.’
    • ‘Then the specimen was transferred into the calibration chamber using an overhead crane.’
    • ‘Then the crane swings back and drops its hook down into the hold again.’
    • ‘The crane collapsed during an operation to increase its height.’
    • ‘A massive crane lowered the tank into place and nothing will be seen above ground except a section of concrete.’
    • ‘The search for remains must continue, says Matt Newman, crane operator.’
    • ‘The driver was negligent in operating the crane and injured a third party.’
    • ‘He reluctantly took the controls and tried to operate the crane, which became unbalanced.’
    • ‘The assembly room is also equipped with a mobile crane capable of lifting 3200 kg.’
    derrick, winch, hoist, davit, windlass, tackle, block and tackle, lifting gear
    sheerlegs
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A moving platform supporting a television or movie camera.
      • ‘Tykwer has a boundless ambition when it comes to complicated crane shots.’
      • ‘Creative use of crane shots heightens the sense of menace at key times.’
      • ‘For the next sequence, the cameraman gets on to the crane for a wide-angle shot.’
      • ‘The film is one enormous set, with product placement everywhere and the camera crew ever keen to test crane shots.’
      • ‘The crew is enormous, stars are pampered, camera cranes abound, everything is shot on studio sets, there is even a helicopter shot.’
      • ‘From somewhere above, a man seated on a crane swung into the staging area.’
      • ‘When, in a rare moment, a crane or long shot is employed, the film starts to rumble awake.’
      • ‘It used to be that a crane shot or a super-special camera package was a real rarity.’
      • ‘Jackson's impossible crane shots and frightening creatures could not possibly have been accomplished without CGI.’
      • ‘In one daring scene he uses a crane shot to swoop from a very high angle into a choker close shot of his sweating angelic face.’
      • ‘Theres a lot of mention of cranes and cameras on sticks.’
      • ‘It witnesses the confession not from inside the police station, but from a single take crane shot outside the building.’
      • ‘Up until recently I'd been using a wheelchair for dolly shots and a plank of wood for a crane.’
      • ‘Von Trier did forego the zoom-in camera on a crane for which Hollywood dance production numbers are cosmetically arranged.’
      • ‘As a child, Oseman remembers acting out scenes with his Lego men, closing one eye and raising his head to simulate a crane shot.’
      • ‘Questioned about a story point, they say things like, ‘Oh I'll just use a crane to shoot that scene.’’
      • ‘Nice photo there showing the full perspective on the crowd from a crane shot.’
      • ‘With cameras mounted on cranes and a blitz of camerawork, they bring the fight scenes from Raging Bull to mind.’
      • ‘But they are the same as furniture, the same as camera cranes, the same as real estate.’
      • ‘The camera is constantly moving in graceful curves and crane shots abound.’

verb

  • 1[no object] Stretch out one's body or neck in order to see something.

    ‘she craned forward to look more clearly’
    • ‘Chairs creaked, and necks craned as every eye tried to catch a glimpse of the stranger.’
    • ‘You'll need to lift your head out of the water, much like a water polo player craning forward to see the ball.’
    • ‘As he craned to see the man's face, Paige yanked him back.’
    • ‘He craned forward in his seat, clutching the reins with one hand and holding his swollen belly with the other.’
    • ‘Sasha craned around to look up at me.’
    • ‘A thousand heads crane forward just for a glimpse of the man.’
    • ‘Syona's head, craned forward, was obscured by her short lustrous hair.’
    • ‘Two hundred Dwarves in the audience craned forward, watching the drama intently.’
    • ‘Rowena craned around to see the clock.’
    • ‘Outside we would go, necks craned, eyes upward, waiting for our glimpse at the wonders of modern aviation.’
    • ‘I craned forward again, catching small parts of the conversation.’
    • ‘Children as young as seven look up at a giant screen, necks craned and mouths open, as a man performs magic on a football field.’
    • ‘"That's really weird, " Cory said, craning to look up at the view.’
    • ‘She raised her head, wondering what if anything to say, and then suddenly craned forward.’
    • ‘My neck, having craned forward for so long, needed a new position.’
    • ‘She flicked her ears and craned across to look out after him.’
    • ‘The hired thugs, both in front and behind him, lowered their daggers and craned forward in anticipation.’
    • ‘A white face on a slender neck - the heron craning forward.’
    • ‘Neck craned upwards, we note the sleek Columbus Circle towers or the GE building's detailing.’
    • ‘But enough necks were craning around for a look at the famous profile.’
    1. 1.1[with object] Stretch out (one's neck) so as to see something.
      ‘craning their necks to get a glimpse of the president’
      • ‘She craned her head around from where she was positioned and grinned at me.’
      • ‘One woman dressed for a night out makes her way up the aisle, craning her neck at the carvings on the ceiling as if in a museum.’
      • ‘Alissa then craned her neck left to right.’
      • ‘I'm a veteran of this route and as usual, I'll be craning my neck when we pass by the ballpark and the marina.’
      • ‘Cautiously, he moved forward, craning his head to the side trying to see if anyone was crouching behind the bush.’
      • ‘Try not to get caught craning your neck to read it.’
      • ‘And Parliament Street was packed with people craning their necks for a look.’
      • ‘She had to crane her neck upward to do so but somehow managed to stay incredibly dignified in the process.’
      • ‘It seemed everyone was craning their necks out of their car windows at something on the left side of the highway.’
      • ‘The men were like tourists, craning their necks and trying to see the firefighters raging up and down the riverbanks.’
      • ‘More than 2,000 people are expected to attend, craning their necks for the massive bonfire and display ‘worth a few grand’.’
      • ‘At the sound of his voice they started, looking first left, then right, then finally craning their necks.’
      • ‘I had my face close to the window, craning my neck to scan.’
      • ‘His eyes snapped open and he craned his head around, searching for someone.’
      • ‘The kid keeps craning his neck around to look.’
      • ‘Anna craned her head over his shoulder to look at what he was doing.’
      • ‘But let's stop craning our necks in search for it, hunh?’
      • ‘She'd been taking out some garbage but had now commenced craning her neck to see into our apartment.’
      • ‘So why, then, do I keep giving myself cramps craning my neck to see down the path?’
  • 2[with object] Move (a heavy object) with a crane.

    ‘the wheelhouse module is craned into position on the hull’
    • ‘The single-storey centre was craned into position.’
    • ‘A specially-designed extension will be built off-site and then craned into place on top of the existing ground-floor catering department.’
    • ‘Powerful magnets were carefully craned over buildings into their new position.’
    • ‘The modules are delivered to site by road where they are craned into position in just a few days.’
    • ‘After manufacture at Huntington, 72 steel-framed modules have now been craned into position at Portsmouth.’

Origin

Middle English: figuratively from crane (the same sense development occurred in the related German Kran and Dutch kraan (see crane), and in French grue). The verb dates from the late 16th century.

Pronunciation:

crane

/krān/

Main definitions of crane in English

: crane1crane2

crane2

noun

  • A tall, long-legged, long-necked bird, typically with white or gray plumage and often with tail plumes and patches of bare red skin on the head. Cranes are noted for their elaborate courtship dances.

    • ‘The injured whooping crane was part of the last remaining wild flock, which numbers around 200 birds.’
    • ‘To see a true crane of pure white was no less than seeing a miracle, and so she could not help but to stare back.’
    • ‘The spot where I like to sit looks out over rocky shallows where ducks, gulls, heron, cranes, and egrets like to gather.’
    • ‘With his last exhibition being on Siberian cranes, feathered creatures equally move Ajay Singh.’
    • ‘She watched a hawk make lazy spirals, and a white crane swooped down into the water next to her.’
    • ‘Big birds such as the cranes and storks too can be seen taking frequent drinks and baths at their troughs.’
    • ‘Both countries have been working together ever since they realized how close the whooping crane was to extinction.’
    • ‘The crane has light to dark blue-gray plumage and a crimson cap at the back of its crown.’
    • ‘Yet there are six subspecies of sandhill crane, and not all are thriving.’
    • ‘High above the skies will be filled with gliding cranes, storks and birds of prey.’
    • ‘In October 2003 the refuge briefly hosted an endangered whooping crane, one of only about three hundred alive today.’
    • ‘The courtship rituals of cranes are elaborate: paired birds spread their wings and leap repeatedly into the air while calling.’
    • ‘The skies are quiet except for the occasional sandhill crane and its raucous cries.’
    • ‘About 1.6 million votes recommended the red-crowned crane to be national bird.’
    • ‘Is it your sense that these feathered dinosaurs are more closely related, to say the crane or the Dodo bird?’
    • ‘They had domesticated geese and pigeons and a wide variety of wild birds like herons, pelicans, cranes and ducks.’
    • ‘Water buffalo and goats graze placidly alongside the track; elegant white cranes glide serenely across the paddy fields.’
    • ‘The zoo hosts a large number of water fowl, cranes and storks - species that are sensitive to changes in wetland systems.’
    • ‘When allowed to multiply, rose scale can turn cranes white.’
    • ‘Distant relatives of cranes, trumpeters are long-legged, chicken-sized birds that glean fallen fruit from the ground.’

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch kraan and German Kran, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin grus and Greek geranos.

Pronunciation:

crane

/krān/