Main definitions of crab in English

: crab1crab2crab3

crab1

noun

  • 1A crustacean with a broad carapace, stalked eyes, and five pairs of legs, the first pair of which are modified as pincers. Crabs are abundant on many shores, especially in the tropics, where some have become adapted to life on land.

    • ‘Young fish, young crabs and molting crabs have lost shelter and refuge from their predators.’
    • ‘You should move to Florida and hunt crabs on the beach all day in the nude.’
    • ‘If we ate a crab with its shell, we would have pretty sore gums.’
    • ‘The torch picked out a tiny red hermit crab as it climbed laboriously across the top of a sponge.’
    • ‘Scientists found male fiddler crabs often aid their neighbors when intruders threaten to move in.’
    • ‘Shining our torches onto the sand reveals thousands of hermit crabs scuttling from the light.’
    • ‘We attributed the effect of predator exclusion primarily to juvenile green crabs and fish.’
    • ‘Eastern populations eat numerous horseshoe crabs during migration.’
    • ‘Generic placement of fossil spider crabs is often difficult because definitive criteria are rarely available for study.’
    • ‘Will I be able to catch the mud crab?’
    • ‘Male horseshoe crabs have two mating tactics that are associated with phenotype.’
    • ‘Fishers in New Brunswick will disobey restrictions on crab fishing this spring.’
    • ‘A large red crab scuttled across the metal, hoping to avoid the snapper.’
    • ‘There are also sand crabs burrowing in the sand, which make good bait too.’
    • ‘Large edible crabs are everywhere, mainly females that are here to spawn.’
    • ‘Not so many people collect the crabs today as it's so labour-intensive.’
    • ‘In fact, more tasty blue crabs are caught and sold than any other Hudson River species.’
    • ‘Several large edible crabs have burrowed under the mast and others live inside the hollow structure.’
    • ‘There really is something very unbecoming about grown men chasing crabs on beaches alone.’
    • ‘Without warning the stalks supporting the crab's beady black eyes shoot straight up at me.’
    1. 1.1The flesh of a crab as food.
      • ‘Other foods high in zinc include oysters, crab, and fortified cereals.’
      • ‘Esther is with Betsy when she gets food poisoning from eating crab.’
      • ‘He reported that freshwater crab was a popular food among many tribes of northeastern region.’
      • ‘The meats consisted of soft shelled crab covered in spices, tender roast beef and chicken.’
      • ‘Special occasions call for a gumbo and vegetable soup with crab or salted meat (calalou).’
      • ‘I had dressed Cornish crab which was absolutely delicious and not too rich as crab can sometimes be.’
      • ‘It's a thin slice of veal with crab on top, topped with a sauce.’
      • ‘The menu included Pembrokeshire crab and roast fillet of Welsh Beef.’
      • ‘Clean spanner crabs and break crab into portions.’
      • ‘We also don't know anyone who eats crab and watermelon together.’
      • ‘Fresh, unadulterated, chilled, lightly seasoned, fabulous crab is one of my most favourite foods.’
      • ‘Sometimes salt beef or salt cod are used, or corned beef or crab.’
      • ‘From Cornish Blue shark steaks to Scarborough fresh-dressed crab, the range of fish is bewildering and the quality peerless.’
      • ‘The salad included some very artificial crab.’
      • ‘Start your evening with assorted cold meats, crab, and jasmine smoked chicken.’
      • ‘Callaloo is a mixture of okra and puréed dasheen leaves, with either crab or salted pork added for flavor.’
      • ‘Place the ring mould on top and fill about a third with dressed crab.’
      • ‘Sarah chose the east coast crab with dill and mustard sauce, while I opted for the seared pigeon breasts.’
      • ‘The buffet is a mountainous feast of crab, salmon, prawns and beef.’
      • ‘The seasoning was an Old Bay seasoning which, I believe, usually goes with crab and other sea food.’
    2. 1.2The zodiacal sign or constellation Cancer.
  • 2A louse that infests human body hair, especially in the genital region, causing extreme irritation.

    Also called pubic louse
    • ‘I fear lung disease, heart disease, cancer, losing control of my bladder and bowels, paralysis and crabs in my underpants.’
    • ‘Commonly called crabs, these lice occur on the skin and hair of your pubic areas and on eyelashes.’
    • ‘The third species is the pubic louse, Phthirus pubis, commonly known as the crab louse.’
    • ‘And in no other job will I catch crabs from innocently sitting in the staff lounge on an extremely festy couch… mmm.’
    • ‘Over the last two years she has been treated for gonorrhea and crab lice.’
    • ‘Same recipe used externally for crabs, lice, and all external parasites.’
    • ‘People can be infested with three types of lice: body lice, head lice and crab or pubic lice.’
    • ‘Pubic lice or crabs are unpleasant, but once diagnosed are thankfully easily treated.’
    • ‘One way to test that possibility will be to look at the other species of lice that live on humans - crabs, or Pthirus pubis.’
    • ‘I believe the first use of pubic wigs was in ancient Egypt as the only cure that they had at the time for crabs.’
    1. 2.1informal An infestation of crab lice.
      • ‘Three weeks later, he had a healthy dose of crabs.’
      • ‘I never had one girl come down with an STD, not even crabs.’
      • ‘So I get pregnant and get the crabs to boot.’
      • ‘It seems that I have severe cases of genital warts, the clap, crabs, herpes and syphillis.’
  • 3A machine for picking up and lifting heavy weights.

verb

  • 1[no object] Move sideways or obliquely.

    ‘he began crabbing sideways across the roof’
    • ‘This old car has had a decent hit on the right rear quarter and crabs its way down the road.’
    • ‘By crabbing into the wind, we can stay lined up with the runway centerline, but we'll actually come in at an angle to the runway.’
    • ‘One of them was on his back and was rapidly crabbing backwards away from the patrol car.’
    • ‘He has retained the tendency to crab a bit across the field.’
    • ‘They crabbed their way down the pitch before No.8 forced his way over for the winning try.’
    • ‘Each time the aircraft is forced to crab into the wind the groundspeed is reduced.’
    • ‘We set out to stage 6 with a car that was crabbing badly.’
    • ‘I tried to escape, crabbing sideways in an effort to crawl away.’
    • ‘I'd had enough and leveled off, because the winds were causing us to crab significantly.’
    • ‘Their forwards were absolutely dominant, crabbing down the pitch, albeit at a tortuously slow rate.’
    illegible, hard to read, indecipherable, unintelligible
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object]Steer (an aircraft or ship) slightly sideways to compensate for a crosswind or current.
      • ‘At low speed, this system will let you crab the boat completely sideways.’
      • ‘As opposed to crabbing into the wind on final, use aileron to lean the aircraft into the wind.’
      • ‘I had to crab north and east to stay near the north road and to keep from being blown into the desert to the west.’
  • 2[no object] Fish for crabs.

    • ‘They used to go duck hunting and crabbing and fishing and that's how they survived and raised all the family.’
    • ‘They took note that it was crabbing season over here and they went crabbing in a major way.’
    • ‘We went fishing, crabbing, and looked for the occasional pigeon and bat.’
    • ‘When he was a boy, he had gone crabbing with his father on the Hudson River.’
    • ‘I know the area well, having fished and crabbed their for many years.’
    • ‘We spent many happy days fishing and crabbing there.’
    • ‘They learnt everything there is to know about crabbing from Marco's father, Emilio's grandfather.’
    • ‘When I was a young boy in the 1930s, I had three loving uncles that took me fishing, crabbing and hunting.’
    • ‘More than 70 children came out of their shells to take part in a crabbing competition.’
    • ‘When they come to the door, you're gonna ask them to come crabbing with us.’
    • ‘She went crabbing and stayed cheerful even though the catch came to a grand total of one crab.’
    • ‘In 2001, the Texas Legislature approved a bill creating the first brief closed season for crabbing in Texas waters.’
    • ‘Virginia refused to comply with its quota, and now faces a complete ban on horseshoe crabbing.’
    • ‘There were several people down there doing some crabbing.’
    • ‘And the season ends early, in October - they no longer can crab in November.’
    • ‘He loved things like going crabbing as a boy, seaside activities, and the tightknit community of the 1950s.’
    • ‘North Korea emphasizes the importance of crabbing to bring in much-needed foreign currency.’
    • ‘My biggest concern for crabbing is the inability of DNR to regulate crab pots.’
    • ‘When I asked him what he liked most about crabbing, his short response said it all, ‘the freedom.’’
    • ‘The dinghies are great for the river and they are excellent for things like crabbing in the sea.’

Phrases

  • catch a crab

    • Make a faulty stroke in which the oar is under water too long or misses the water altogether.

      • ‘Coles caught a crab midway through their Olympic heat, sending both of the rowers flying out of the boat.’
      • ‘With less than 100 metres to go Great Britain had a slight lead in the first of two repechages when bow, Alison Mowbray, caught a crab.’
      • ‘There was still some way to go; to catch a crab now might slow the boat down and hand it to them.’
      • ‘Just strokes before the line, Great Britain's second crew caught a crab which slowed them down to a crawl.’
      • ‘Under threat for the lead with 600 metres to go, Lithuania caught a crab and Argentina was able to push past and finish first.’
      • ‘In a very unusual display at this level of rowing, Kucharski caught a crab with 200 metres to go pushing them further back.’
      • ‘The two continued to press each other and nerves must have been affecting Raduenzel when she caught a crab with 600 metres to go.’
      • ‘The South Africans then caught a crab just metres before the line which dropped them out of qualifying position.’
      • ‘Australia caught a crab and dropped to third while the United States slipped out of the qualification spots.’

Origin

Old English crabba, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch krabbe, and more distantly to Dutch kreeft and German Krebs; also to crab.

Pronunciation:

crab

/krab/

Main definitions of crab in English

: crab1crab2crab3

crab2

noun

Pronunciation:

crab

/krab/

Main definitions of crab in English

: crab1crab2crab3

crab3

noun

informal
  • An irritable person.

    • ‘The girl started scuttling backward, mindful of the fact that she probably looked like a crusty old crab.’
    • ‘I snickered, and asked, ‘Did you at least manage to blast that old crab into smithereens?’’

verb

informal
  • 1[no object] Grumble, typically about something petty.

    ‘on picnics, I would crab about sand in my food’
    • ‘The city is crabbing today about clock management, and there was an onside kick late in the game.’
    • ‘We sure don't need any more songs crabbing about how superficial the entertainment industry is.’
    • ‘Yes, usually we crab when a strike puts us out.’
    • ‘I'm going to finish this little pity party and get all my crabbing out at once.’
    • ‘I knew she was catching up on day's worth of missed sleep, so I didn't blame her for crabbing at me.’
    • ‘I have chattering and squealing, screeching and cooing, crabbing and carping.’
    • ‘I had everything under control until you started crabbing about which books you hadn't read.’
    • ‘The President crabbed about the leak in his Monday press conference.’
    • ‘She crabbed again when he didn't take advantage of the multi-laned road.’
    • ‘Even if you were that man himself, you have no reason to be crabbed at because I'm having a bad morning.’
  • 2[with object] Act so as to spoil.

    ‘you're trying to crab my act’

Origin

Late 16th century (referring to hawks, meaning claw or fight each other): from Low German krabben; related to crab.

Pronunciation:

crab

/krab/