Definition of cozy in English:

cozy

(British cosy)

adjective

  • 1Giving a feeling of comfort, warmth, and relaxation.

    ‘a cozy cabin tucked away in the trees’
    • ‘Everything about him felt soft and warm and cozy and comfortable and, more than anything, safe.’
    • ‘After dinner, you can adjourn to a cozy room with comfortable sofas and modern fittings for a nightcap.’
    • ‘Despite the risk of ruin and long days, life in the sugarhouse is a joy amidst the sweet steam rising through the roof vent and the cozy warmth of the fire.’
    • ‘Afterward, they gather around the fireplace to drink beer, tell stories, and woozily stroll back to their cabins to sink into cozy loft beds.’
    • ‘Thick quilts provide the inspiration for jackets and coats, conveying cozy warmth plus convincing lightness.’
    • ‘They cater to people who want to have a safe and cozy place to relax after work.’
    • ‘I reminisce for a fleeting moment about breezy Saturday nights, meaningful movies, black cozy couches and the comfort of a brawny shoulder to rest on.’
    • ‘And what better way than to spend Valentine's Day than tucked up in a cosy pub?’
    • ‘Next, find a comfortable and cozy thing to sit upon.’
    • ‘You can spend the night in warm, cosy log cabins watching the northern lights dance across the sky.’
    • ‘I shut my eyes hoping that all this was some nightmare and I would wake up in the cozy comfort of my bed but no such luck.’
    • ‘I felt warm and cosy, and deliciously comfortable for the first time in almost a week, and snuggled down to enjoy another five minutes.’
    • ‘A pint of stout, comforted by a cosy interior, is a temptation indeed for the thirsty tourist.’
    • ‘How brilliant to have a cozy home to provide comfort for my family, my friends and myself!’
    • ‘The August air seems warm and cozy around me, surrounding me in a deep haze.’
    • ‘It was a true romantic rendezvous for many a couple who made themselves comfortable in the cosy confines of the pub.’
    • ‘Think cosy log cabin, lots of satisfied regulars and a country dinner party feel.’
    • ‘The soft lens allows flexibility, moulding the goggles to the face for a comfortable cosy fit while the air system feature enables air to pleasantly circulate around the eyes.’
    • ‘Painted in a dark bordello-esque red, this cosy restaurant has a warm, welcoming and distinctly lived-in atmosphere.’
    • ‘The outdoor area is far more appealing than the inside area, though it is comforting and cozy down the stairs and inside the cellar.’
    snug, comfortable, warm, restful, homelike, homey, homely, cheerful, welcoming, pleasant, agreeable
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a relationship or conversation) intimate and relaxed.
      • ‘‘I saw that you and he got a little cozy in the lobby,’ Chris teased as he sat on her bed.’
      • ‘The colonialists and the communalists had a cozy relationship at a deeper level.’
      • ‘It's a cosy relationship of mutual dependence that is replicated throughout the whole of the human services.’
      • ‘Not surprisingly, it has become a popular eat-out for the corporates, families and for the cosy twosomes.’
      • ‘It was a lovely family moment, full of cuddling and hugging and cozy fun.’
      • ‘What do you make of the state of the cozy relationship?’
      • ‘However, this cosy relationship ended when Wilkinson's younger brother, William, returned from Europe in the late 1780s.’
      • ‘During their 45 minutes on stage together, the frequent physical contact and chatter between the two signified a cozy relationship.’
      • ‘Policy communities are cosy relationships between organized interests and officials.’
      • ‘Then in steps the villain, with an almost Machiavellian intent to wreck the perfectly cosy relationship that the two lovers have built up.’
      intimate, relaxed, informal, friendly
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Avoiding or not offering challenge or difficulty; complacent.
      ‘a rather cozy assumption among automakers that they would never actually go bust’
      • ‘Marriage followed alongside a comfortable life on the cosy road to middle-class success.’
      • ‘Blogging is said to have changed modern journalism by challenging the cosy media monopoly with its grass-roots approach to issues.’
      • ‘That manifests itself in a cosy collectivism that seeks to minimise the importance of any problem.’
      • ‘But there is a cosy complacency that Scotland doesn't suffer from it, when that is simply not true.’
      • ‘I want my world rocked and my cosy assumptions blown out of the water.’
      • ‘This cosy set-up was unlikely to be challenged as long as the company performed financially.’
      • ‘To start with this is an unproven assertion based all too obviously on a cosy view of a mythical working class family from the Fifties.’
      • ‘But like many others, I have always been uneasy with that cosy assumption: it lets everyone off their own personal hook.’
      • ‘For make no mistake, they are challenging not just our cosy ideas of what it means to be Scottish and support football, they are threatening the very world order of soccer itself.’
    3. 1.3derogatory, informal (of a transaction or arrangement) working to the mutual advantage of those involved (used to convey a suspicion of corruption)
      ‘a cozy deal’
      • ‘It is a cosy little arrangement between the clubs.’
      • ‘The cozy ties among him, the company, and its board are also coming under scrutiny.’
      • ‘This isn't good enough, and a current court case may end this cosy little arrangement.’
      • ‘The cosy relationship between old political strongmen and big business is dead.’
      • ‘If this sounds like a pretty cozy arrangement, it is.’
      • ‘But it illustrates yet again the uncomfortably cosy relationship between those in power and those charged with policing them in the nicest possible way.’
      • ‘If not, how does one explain the cozy relationship between a major news organization and the campaign team?’
      • ‘If so - and it's hard to think of any other reason - the relationship between the Court of Appeals and the company seems just a little too cosy for comfort.’
      • ‘The participants also felt that where the press had a cosy relationship with politicians, it was bound to have negative consequences.’
      • ‘Judges hardly interfered with decisions of the executive, and the judiciary and the government had a cozy relationship.’
      • ‘Buying off tyrants with cosy deals and soothing them with weasel words is yesterday's strategy.’
      • ‘This was a cosy arrangement, but it is no longer viable.’
      • ‘Shareholders considered the arrangement too cosy.’
      • ‘He was cozy enough with management that he was allowed to attend board meetings.’
      • ‘There will be no more cosy deals or discussions that exclude the public.’
      • ‘Impropriety regarding cozy relationships with local politicians also surfaced.’
      • ‘This cosy arrangement has been abruptly terminated, however, by new government regulations limiting the sort of work that amateurs can carry out.’
      • ‘What we do not want is more delaying tactics, promises of announcements further down the track, cosy meetings and backroom deals.’
      • ‘And as it all unravelled, cosy deals, lax auditing, wheels within wheels, and slippery accounting was exposed.’
      • ‘After all, that might endanger the prosperity of the railways, and their cozy relationship with the grain companies.’

noun

  • 1A soft covering to keep a teapot, boiled egg, etc., hot.

    ‘a photograph of Smith pouring tea from a pot with a knitted cozy’
    ‘mug cozies are simple to make’
    • ‘She had just put the cosy on the steaming pot of tea when the front door opened violently and crashed against the wall.’
    • ‘I opened up my package to find a beautiful little egg cosy with the most pretty embellishments, including twinkly crystals, on the top.’
    • ‘I devised these flowery egg cosies to use up oddments of yarn that I had dyed.’
    • ‘The mug is wrapped in a delightful knitted cosy that will keep your drink and hands warm in chilly weather.’
    • ‘For the cafetière cosy, you will need 1 ball chunky-weight yarn.’
    • ‘While your tea steeps, keep it hot with a teapot cosy.’
    • ‘In the morning a servant brings a pot of tea in a cozy on a tray, with warm milk and hot water in the cup to warm it.’
    • ‘A friend and I haunt craft shows for the tackiest crafts, and cozies are frequently some of the best.’
    • ‘This knitting pattern shows you how to make an adorable cozy for your hard-boiled egg.’
    • ‘After a quarter of an hour, hot buttered toast on a covered hot water plate, with the Staffordshire cottage tea pot in its floral cosy, arrived.’
    1. 1.1 A soft decorative cover for an object.
      ‘a handmade phone cozy’
      ‘crocheted tissue box cozies’
      • ‘The latest global rage is yarn-bombing, a wool-based graffiti in which knitting fanatics drape potholes, cars and statues in crazy cosies.’
      • ‘This lovely, quirky toilet roll cosy has been hand crocheted using high quality pure wools.’
      • ‘Often dozens of balls of wool are used to make sleeves or cosies for everyday objects including cars and trees.’
      • ‘They take their art to the streets, stitching cosies from everything to bike racks to entire buses.’
      • ‘They're fashionable toilet paper cozies.’
      • ‘Chan has got her own store where you can purchase crocheted corn-dog pen cozies and even crocheted bread-and-butter scarves!’
      • ‘She knows this problem well and has even created lighter cozies to prevent her lighters from vanishing.’
      • ‘Who even knew tissue box cozies were a thing?’
      • ‘Whether she's in the office, at home or out to lunch, these chic cozies will keep her phone off the floor and out of danger from being stepped on.’
      • ‘Use denim or any scraps of fabric you have to create a lovely upcycled phone cosy.’
    2. 1.2North American An insulating sleeve used to keep a canned or bottled drink cold.
      ‘guests received beer cozies’
      • ‘Does extra insulation (like a beer cozy) improve the plain metal bottle, or the insulated cup?’
      • ‘All you need is a foam can cozy and a 3D rapid prototyping printer.’
      • ‘Centerpieces at each table included orchids, and peonies, and guests were later gifted beer cozies at the end of the night.’
      • ‘This neoprene insulated sleeve slides over the bottle just like a regular beer can cozy, but it also features a built-in handle and comes in two fly patterns.’
      • ‘You open bottles, clink them against your friends' bottles, and dress them up in little cozies to keep them cold.’
      • ‘Did you know that a beer cozy can be repurposed as a cheap lens protector?’
      • ‘Get the kind of drink cozies that you put in the freezer.’
      • ‘The studios have designed these humorous and manly cozies that give your can of beer a beard.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • 1Give (someone) a feeling of comfort or complacency.

    ‘she cozied him, pretending to find him irresistibly attractive’
    • ‘But it won't be enough: The Horned Frogs will be cozied up at home by the time January 3 rolls around.’
    • ‘She gave me a hug, and took me home, and cosied me up in her spare room.’
    • ‘It made sense to see that they'd cozied themselves within a personal urban pine forest to watch paired kids parade past in colorful and spooky garb.’
    1. 1.1cozy upno object Snuggle up to.
      ‘almost everyone loves to cozy up to a roaring fire’
      ‘I shall have a certain lovely lady to cozy up with’
      • ‘Conservative nutritionists caution that more long-term research is needed before they'll cozy up to all these claims.’
      • ‘But, be very careful who you cozy up to in the process.’
      • ‘Even if you're single, you'll want to cozy up to something cute.’
      • ‘With his inimitable style of cosying up to most of the families for whom he irons clothes, he has made himself indispensable to many households.’
      • ‘It is the temptation of the public intellectual to cozy up to that which he or she should be evaluating critically.’
      • ‘I cozy up to the new Miss Canada International and ask her what incredible prizes she has won.’
      • ‘With the moon cozying up to Venus in a special way this week, you could be thinking about making a big move too.’
      • ‘There's a pasta bar in the centre of it all, which you can cozy up to if you're by yourself.’
      • ‘Clearly, she gets a lot of love, and she cozies up to you on impact.’
      • ‘One blond girl is cozying up to her, and the other identical-looking one is trying to, but Reba is holding her away, squishing her face.’
    2. 1.2cozy up tono object Ingratiate oneself with.
      ‘he decided to resign rather than cozy up to hard-liners in the party’
      • ‘‘It is a world in which refuse collectors cosy up to barristers, split along moral lines rather than social ones’.’
      • ‘He and his father have always shown a preference to cozying up to the establishment rather than actually helping people.’
      • ‘Yet network managers don't seem to mind, and many politicians across the narrow liberal-to-conservative spectrum never seem to tire of cozying up to him on the air.’
      • ‘In fact, the more a politician cozies up to the United Nations, the less I like him.’
      • ‘Is there something to the charge that he cozies up to people in power?’
      • ‘What we've seen here plays right into public concerns about whether or not reporters are mostly focused on serving the public's need to know, or cozying up with sources.’
      • ‘Is this an act of atonement or a cozying up to future journalists?’
      • ‘it has been on the air for nearly two years, but only recently have people not directly involved in the program become aware of the extent to which technology is allowing him to cozy up to local listeners.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, he says anyone who surfs the Web should be worried about how Internet service providers are cozying up to law-enforcement authorities on this case.’
      • ‘Ironically, a cozying up to the current government may have led to the perceived malaise.’

Origin

Early 18th century (originally Scots): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

cozy

/ˈkoʊzi//ˈkōzē/