Definition of covariant in English:

covariant

noun

Mathematics
  • A function of the coefficients and variables of a given function which is invariant under a linear transformation except for a factor equal to a power of the determinant of the transformation.

    • ‘Baseline covariants were included in models that were judged a priori to be clinically sound.’
    • ‘This was dealt with by using the SES score as a covariant in the analysis.’
    • ‘One-way analysis of covariance, with pretest scores as covariants, were used when tests for homogeneity of variance dictated that ANCOVA was warranted.’
    • ‘Residual depression scores and negative affectivity scores also were linked to cardiac-related mortality after adjusting for each other and for cardiac covariants.’
    • ‘This was significant even after adjustments for covariants.’

adjective

Mathematics
  • 1Changing in such a way that mathematical interrelations with another simultaneously changing quantity or set of quantities remain unchanged.

    • ‘Moreover, for the minor factorial axis, the covariant part of characters becomes less intuitive and noise becomes more important.’
    • ‘Size change is so covariant among morphological traits in general that separate body parts are often good estimators of change in other parts.’
    • ‘Salmon, in his famous text, gave an equation in covariant form.’
    • ‘In 1887 he published a famous paper in which he developed the calculus of tensors, following on the work of Christoffel, including covariant differentiation.’
    • ‘The special theory of relativity is notorious for positing laws that turn what we thought were invariant quantities, e.g., length, duration, and mass, into covariant quantities.’
    1. 1.1 Of, having the properties of, or relating to a covariant.
      • ‘Thus each axis can be seen as a composite morphological character combining the covariant part of the initial morphometric parameters.’
      • ‘Moreover, for the minor factorial axis, the covariant part of characters becomes less intuitive and noise becomes more important.’
      • ‘However, such covariant mutation can also occur within closely related groups.’
      • ‘Salmon, in his famous text, gave an equation in covariant form.’
      • ‘In the theory of relativity, there are both covariant and invariant laws.’

Pronunciation

covariant

/ˌkoʊˈvɛriənt//ˌkōˈverēənt/