Definition of court in English:

court

noun

  • 1A tribunal presided over by a judge, judges, or a magistrate in civil and criminal cases.

    ‘she will take the matter to court’
    as modifier ‘a court case’
    ‘a settlement was reached during the first sitting of the court’
    • ‘But, in any case, the court's jurisdiction will not be retrospective.’
    • ‘It must be remembered that most criminals are convicted in our courts of law, by circumstantial evidence.’
    • ‘Hundreds of thousands of right-wing Orthodox attend rallies to protest the supreme court's decisions.’
    • ‘Mental health professionals are often called as expert witnesses in court proceedings with children.’
    • ‘Wakefield magistrates' court was told he had no previous convictions.’
    • ‘Pupils and parents attended a high court hearing in April.’
    • ‘By June this year, the Task Force had successfully commenced 17 criminal prosecutions in the courts of law with only three of the prosecuted cases falling through.’
    • ‘The trial in the court of public opinion is no different than a trial in front of a jury in a court of law.’
    • ‘Many final decisions are made by court rulings, which further delays the process.’
    • ‘The Supreme Court once again overturned the lower court's decision last year.’
    • ‘And she, too, faces the prospect of incarceration after the court hearing.’
    • ‘The two cases of the supreme court heard today were cases in point.’
    • ‘Acts done in the course of such operations are not justiciable and the courts of law cannot take cognizance of them.’
    • ‘They're going to allow past cases to be brought into the court proceedings.’
    • ‘Even in a court of law the judge accepts my expert witness opinion without adulteration or hesitation, and you are not beyond the courts.’
    • ‘It is inherent in the proper conduct of judicial proceedings in a court of law.’
    • ‘Anything you say can and will be used in court against you in the court of law.’
    • ‘It cannot properly fulfil this dual function if it confines itself like a court of law to adjudicating on pleaded points.’
    • ‘Therefore, the court of public opinion is more harsh in judgment than the court of law.’
    • ‘In our courts of law when a judge employs a jury, he or she tells them to decide based on probability, based on the evidence presented.’
    • ‘In 1996, a federal district court ruled that such inequities do exist.’
    • ‘Whatever state supreme courts decide, their verdicts could not be appealed to a federal tribunal.’
    court of law, law court, bench, bar, court of justice, judicature, tribunal, forum, chancery, assizes
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The place where a court meets.
      • ‘A man who tried to enter a court building with a knife may be sent to prison.’
      • ‘In the escort service, the police's main role was to supervise the transfer of remand prisoners between police stations and courts.’
      • ‘Visits to police stations, jails, courts and offices of the Human Rights Commission and Women's Commission will be part of the functions.’
      • ‘He also said that the security measures in the court buildings would be tightened.’
      • ‘The teenager hid his face from the media when he was released from the back of the court building and taken away by police.’
      • ‘He parked his Honda in the Bridge Street car park, close to the court building, but a delay in the case slowed his return by more than an hour.’
      • ‘Scores of journalists, mainly Spanish and British, converged on the court building.’
      • ‘Fed-up court officials refused to accept prisoners after they were brought to the court building late.’
      • ‘Police said a man suspected of trying to attack Burrell in the court building's foyer was arrested.’
      • ‘I met Catherine at the courts after lunch, both of us dreading the hours of grading and drills.’
      • ‘It was at this point it became apparent that the case was about to collapse - although the jury was not even in the court building.’
      • ‘There would also be increased armed protection of possible targets, including barriers at government offices, courts and other sensitive buildings.’
      • ‘The temperature in the rooms of the court building is usually set as low as 16 degrees Celsius.’
      • ‘Following the announcement of the court's decision, violence erupted outside the court building.’
      • ‘More than 500 people have visited the hall during a series of open days and given their views on what the Grade II listed building and former courts should be used for.’
      • ‘Eight are held in a new prison complex next to the court buildings.’
      • ‘Wiltshire County Council closed the courts building in the mid-1980s and sold it off to a local property development company, Davis and Dyke.’
      • ‘A man who attacked a prison officer while in a court dock has been jailed for three months.’
      • ‘The three men thanked jurors individually as the 11 women and one man left the court building, then they went off to celebrate.’
    2. 1.2 The judge or judges presiding at a court.
      • ‘A minimum of 60 ratifications is required to establish the 18-judge court at The Hague.’
  • 2A quadrangular area, either open or covered, marked out for ball games such as tennis or basketball.

    ‘I prefer an indoor court’
    • ‘Leisure facilities include gym, spa (with sauna and steam bath), jogging track, tennis and squash courts.’
    • ‘The basketball courts were surrounded by a high fence, with only one entrance on the field side.’
    • ‘It also boasts a sauna, massage rooms, a hydrotherapy pool, weight room, squash, and basketball courts and a cafeteria for the players.’
    • ‘42m shopping area and a newly-refurbished leisure centre that boasts squash courts, a coffee bar and a crèche.’
    • ‘He shook his head and ran to the other side of the basketball court outside his building to go retrieve his ball.’
    • ‘The 27 acres of grounds of Stainrigg include lawns surrounded by trees, a walled garden as well as a croquet lawn and a boule court.’
    • ‘Exercise facilities, indoor pool, squash and racquetball courts, and aerobic classes.’
    • ‘It was basically a basketball court surrounded by some brick steps and arches.’
    • ‘The ornamented gatehouse, garden, and royal tennis court further enhanced this favourite seat of the Scottish monarchs.’
    • ‘But games aren't played on paper, they're played in arenas and on courts surrounding by 3000 rabid screaming fans.’
    • ‘The upper levels of ball courts and exercise rooms surround the pool's large volume, looking out onto it through glazed walls.’
    • ‘The whole court was surrounded by fans, half for the East, half for the North.’
    • ‘A sports science and psychology building would be built on the site of the existing swimming pool, health centre and squash courts, with a third building behind.’
    • ‘As well as the 150 capacity clubhouse and four new changing rooms, the club is building two new netball courts which can also be used as hard court training for the rugby sides.’
    • ‘After 12 months, we will convert the asphalt area into tennis and netball courts.’
    • ‘The building is being converted into a sports centre, with six squash courts, a gymnasium, sauna, lounges and bar and a sports shop in the foyer.’
    • ‘The Centre has four squash courts and also boasts saunas, a steam room and sunbeds, a crèche, a gym and an aerobics studio.’
    • ‘While living in the village he played a major part in helping to build the Tennis Club courts and also the Bowling Club's green.’
    • ‘The hotel has it's own private beach, gym, tennis squash and badminton courts.’
    • ‘The original sauna and jacuzzi in a turret have remained, alongside a swimming pool and clay tennis court.’
    playing area, enclosure, field, ground, ring, rink, green, alley, stadium, track, arena
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A quadrangular area surrounded by a building or group of buildings.
      • ‘Traditional Cambridge colleges, modelled on monastic cloisters, consist of courts surrounded by walls of individual rooms.’
      • ‘The idea is for a public museum to open in the old police station, cells and Victorian court in the historic Grade I listed building.’
      • ‘A court surrounded by a wall of individual rooms was the generating idea of the building.’
      • ‘The sun shone brightly through the spreading leaves of the oak trees that surrounded the court.’
      • ‘Vaulted archways lead to shaded courts, while gardens surround the buildings on all sides.’
      • ‘The rhythm of its open colonnade is echoed in that of the hall across the court.’
      • ‘Surrounded by a broad moat, the palace buildings are arranged around a great inner court.’
      • ‘The most important room on view is the Harem, a compound of around 300 shining tiled chambers on several levels, connected by arcaded courts and fountain gardens.’
      yard, courtyard, quadrangle, square, close, enclosure, precinct, esplanade
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 A subdivision of a building, usually a large hall extending to the ceiling with galleries and staircases.
      • ‘The museum comprises a torso of galleries linked to a smaller head of entrance court and offices.’
      • ‘One treks through labyrinthine passages to discrete galleries and courts, even to the stacks and aisles of the Carnegie Library within the complex.’
      • ‘When visitors now enter the building the vista continues across the daylit central court into the rear garden.’
  • 3The establishment, retinue, and courtiers of a sovereign.

    ‘the emperor is shown with his court’
    • ‘Its title character moves from the endangered household of Princess Elizabeth to the unhappy court of Queen Mary.’
    • ‘The royal court was obsessed with following the French style in all matters of fashion, decor and food.’
    • ‘She often danced for the court at Versailles and Fontainebleau.’
    • ‘The king and his court, with the royal family and household at its centre, were the focus and fulcrum of English government and politics.’
    • ‘He was an honoured Christian poet in the court of the Umayyads and an ardent propagandist of this dynasty.’
    • ‘The most interesting aspect of the show is the use of the court jester.’
    • ‘Gone is the raconteur and court jester rolled into one big loveable package.’
    • ‘His disdain for our countrymen at the court of Queen Anne was almost pathological.’
    • ‘He had determined to rule England from his court and household, and not through the nobility.’
    • ‘Maurice's grandson William was educated at the royal court along with King Henry VIII.’
    • ‘In early medieval times, the court, or household, was the centre of government.’
    • ‘The cult of St George was nurtured at the court of Edward III and the saint became a divine protector of English soldiers in battle.’
    • ‘Their vivid, jewel-like tones were well suited to the tastes of the Mughal court.’
    • ‘All these tombs had been laid out to a single design, a unified architectural conception of the king surrounded by his court, in death as in life.’
    • ‘Rather than being written out of society, they were given prestigious positions in temples, at court or in wealthy households.’
    • ‘In 1856, during a stay in London, he sold 31 pictures to the royal household and court.’
    • ‘Roland Dee dealt in textiles and, in addition, was a gentleman sewer at the court of Henry VIII.’
    royal household, establishment, retinue, entourage, train, suite, escort, company, attendant company, staff, personnel, cortège, following, bodyguard
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    1. 3.1 A sovereign and his or her councilors, constituting a ruling power.
      ‘relations between the king and the imperial court’
      • ‘The expansion of trade along the Thames, and the broadening power of the royal court led to a London property boom.’
      • ‘Provincial life was left to the dominance of the ennobled office-holders of the sovereign courts.’
      • ‘They also transacted business for the imperial court and were awarded ranks and privileges.’
      • ‘Bismarck rushed from Paris, where he represented Prussia at the court of Napoleon III.’
      • ‘The king had been surrounded by a hostile court, treated badly, and kept from exercising power.’
      • ‘The court surrounded and, to some extent, protected the ruler.’
      • ‘Though the aristocracy had been abolished by his father, Reza, the shah had reintroduced a court largely without titles.’
      • ‘Leonardo clearly believed that wealth, patronage, and political power lay in the courts to the east of mainland Europe.’
      • ‘He was a leading figure at the courts of Henry VII and Henry VIII.’
      • ‘Chandu Shah, a Banker of Delhi, wielded a lot of influence at the Mughal court.’
      • ‘The figure on the right is Jean de Dinteville, the French ambassador to the English court of Henry VIII.’
      • ‘The palace courts, whose rulers were in close contact with one another, played a critical role in military and diplomatic interactions.’
      • ‘A year later, just 25, he was sent to the Tsarist court as British Vice-Consul to Moscow.’
      • ‘There he stood, bowing politely like a grand Lord at the court of an Empress.’
      • ‘The court and the royal entourage were the great centres of power.’
    2. 3.2 A sovereign's residence.
      • ‘Winter passed swiftly in the court of Charlemagne, for there was never any lack of amusements.’
      • ‘Red deer, along with various wildfowl and fish, were all important elements in the menus of the royal court of Henry VIII.’
      • ‘The re-established papacy soon transferred its court to the Vatican Palace.’
      • ‘He also continued his law career taking up residence at the courts of Mainz before 1670.’
      • ‘Europe was impressed by the splendours of the court of Versailles.’
      • ‘Delicacies such as kebabs and curries that were introduced to royal courts by the Moghuls have now been woven into the local cuisine.’
      royal residence, palace, castle, manor, hall
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]dated
  • 1Be involved with romantically, typically with the intention of marrying.

    ‘he was courting a girl from the neighboring farm’
    no object ‘we went to the movies when we were courting’
    • ‘He shouldn't be courting her let alone possibly wanting to marry her.’
    • ‘Memories flood her mind bringing back images of the man who had once besotted her, courted her and married her, of the man who became her heart and soul.’
    • ‘I have to tell you, it worries me that you take care of such a beautiful girl, when you are courting my sister.’
    • ‘She watched her older sisters be courted and then married, and she began emulating them at an early age.’
    • ‘I was attractive, at least that is what the suitors would say when they came with the intentions of courting me.’
    woo, go out with, be involved with, be romantically linked with, pursue, run after, chase, seek the company of, make advances to, make up to, flirt with
    go out together, go out, go with each other, keep company
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a male bird or other animal) try to attract (a mate).
      • ‘Males of both species readily courted females of both species.’
      • ‘Two percent of male ostriches ignore females and instead court other males with a lively dance.’
      • ‘Smaller groups usually consist of an unmated female courted by unmated males.’
      • ‘After the female moults the male then comes and courts the female and then deposits a spermatophore.’
      • ‘Along the way, the birds court and mate, thwart the red-tailed hawks, and breed.’
    2. 1.2 Pay special attention to (someone) in an attempt to win their support or favor.
      ‘Western politicians courted the leaders of the newly independent states’
      • ‘Conner had been the first, albeit a bit unknowingly, to come to the castle in an attempt to court her.’
      • ‘It is not, however, the job of a leader to court popularity, and certainly not in the complex area of drugs.’
      • ‘A spokesman denied the archbishop's action was a deliberate attempt to court conservative Catholics.’
      • ‘That is precisely the issue that has been raised by the National Party in its attempt to try to court votes.’
      • ‘Central governments have courted them for support or tried to crush them.’
      • ‘The heritage is authentic: while the opportunist ploughboy was penning those lines, he was also courting the favour of every belted earl in the peerage.’
      • ‘I half-expected him to give each manatee a friendly slap across the back, he reminded me so much of a local politician courting his constituents.’
      • ‘he has been actively courting trust members and numerous wealthy supporters of the team in recent days.’
      • ‘A politician in her own right, she was courted by the Republicans to run for her late husband's senate seat.’
      • ‘They are openly courting the favours of imperialism.’
      • ‘He had hoped to challenge her by courting black voters, but their support is split.’
      • ‘He has said nothing about the Republicans' actions in the election campaign because he does not want to alienate right-wing forces whose support he is courting.’
      • ‘It has been decades since other world leaders have courted a pope so assiduously.’
      • ‘In the early 1900s political parties courted the new immigrants, he said.’
      • ‘Even that campaign, which has benefited most from the anti-war position, has made no special attempt at courting the anti-globalization coalition.’
      • ‘All the celebrity magazines have their stable of favourites, whom they court with pages and pages of glowing copy week in, week out.’
      • ‘More displays like last night's will court him no favours in Detroit or elsewhere.’
      • ‘No politician will come courting us until I can say that we have several hundred thousand members.’
      • ‘Now they've got the world's attention and are courted by the media and politicians.’
      • ‘Since joining the party on a promise of a junior ministerial post, he has assiduously courted his parliamentary colleagues and concentrated on building a support base among the membership.’
      • ‘Their cowardly producers make a big deal out of courting our support and money, but they never deliver the goods.’
      curry favour with, make up to, play up to
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Go to great lengths to win (favorable attention)
      ‘he never had to court the approval of the political elite’
      • ‘A legal battle with those he has worked hard to court in the past?’
      • ‘The financial group is also courting foreign strategic investment from an assortment of overseas institutions.’
      • ‘If you have courted public attention then you have less ground to object to the intrusion which follows.’
      • ‘Although happy to be given the retrospective collection, she didn't court the attention.’
      • ‘It is he, not the Prime Minister, who must court attention ostentatiously.’
      • ‘Well, these bags have been courting attention this past fortnight or so.’
      • ‘He studied Italian grammar to win the approval of the major in the hospital and courted the favor of Captain Paravicini.’
      • ‘Publicity is not something he courts, the only recognition that really matters to him comes from those within the game.’
      • ‘Having got their break, it wasn't long before the band was courting the attention of the Radio 1 DJ, who quickly got them in for a live session.’
      • ‘There was a time when controversy was never far from the all-rounder's door, though it was not courted deliberately.’
      • ‘But let's not forget that she courted attention herself.’
      • ‘Although noted for an ability to work outdoors amid crowds of spectators, he never courted attention.’
      • ‘He has never courted approval, least of all affection, but has continued to stare straight ahead with his own goals always in view, to be attained in his way.’
      seek, try to obtain, pursue, go after, strive for, go for, push towards, work towards, be intent on, aim at, aim for, have as a goal, have as an objective, aspire to
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 Risk incurring (misfortune) because of the way one behaves.
      ‘he has often courted controversy’
      • ‘This is referred to as ‘deliberately courting the risk’.’
      • ‘In his early years he was not averse to courting controversy and he played a major role in the Language Freedom Movement in the 1960s, which campaigned against compulsory Irish in schools.’
      • ‘He refused to return to Napoli and moved back to Spain and then Argentina for a largely anonymous spell, before courting controversy again in another World Cup USA 1994.’
      • ‘They knew we had courted arrest and had no intentions of escaping.’
      • ‘However, I think I am hardly courting controversy if I say he is no oil painting.’
      • ‘So he courted his own fate, he was tricked by an extremely sophisticated ruse and met his death.’
      • ‘Recognised by critics as one of the most important talents in Scottish theatre, he has courted controversy with his subject matter and style.’
      • ‘In trying to persuade the audience of a perspective that could be viewed as favourable to Maori, he courts the risk of being judged as partial, radical or extreme.’
      • ‘The drug helps narcoleptics stay awake, but has courted controversy as the remedy of choice for jetsetters whose multi-timezone lifestyles get them down.’
      • ‘That said, his maverick tendencies are becoming almost a trademark of the man, and I'd wager a punt or two that he'll be courting controversy again before we next go to the polls.’
      • ‘They have also courted controversy, particularly over the infamous deep-fat fryer scene.’
      • ‘Though I knew I would be courting health risks, I decided there was only one way to find out: try it myself, and see what it did.’
      • ‘Her studies of pubescent girls and her pictures of her own children in provocative poses have courted controversy wherever they have been shown.’
      • ‘But public service broadcasting is about making mistakes, taking risks and courting unpopularity.’
      • ‘Only by courting controversy has she managed to enjoy the halogen warmth of media attention.’
      • ‘He had a vision, and he courted peril in his attempt to take his dreams to market.’
      • ‘The size and volume of forms and the amount of tax law an individual is expected to comprehend courts the risk that tax evasion will see a quantum leap.’
      • ‘My feeling, swallowing sour grapes and all, is that he was probably courting controversy, and blog inches, in choosing a postmodern conceptual/performance artist.’
      • ‘The group has courted controversy from the start.’
      • ‘While traditionally rewarding, investing in shares courts risk.’
      risk, invite, attract, provoke, be likely to cause, bring on oneself
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • go to court

    • Take legal action.

      • ‘It is all about stopping the citizen from being armed with the resources to go to court to vindicate legal rights.’
      • ‘And you've gone to court and filed the report?’
      • ‘But is that an argument which is put by defence lawyers when these cases go to court?’
      • ‘She did not have the funds to take him to court and she saw no benefit in going to court after she got his sworn information.’
      • ‘So too might going to court to obtain injunction to restrain continued threatened assault against you by your political opponent.’
      • ‘Now prior to him committing the offence and going to court, was it possible to get treatment for him?’
      • ‘But few borrowers can afford the legal fees to go to court, or even realise that this right exists.’
      • ‘However, they give useful practical guidance on a procedure to protect doctors without actually going to court.’
      • ‘The point has never been legally challenged, but pro-hunt campaigners believe there is a case and have gone to court to seek a judicial review.’
      • ‘In response he sought legal assistance and has gone to court over his benefits.’
  • in court

    • Appearing as a party or an attorney in a court of law.

      • ‘The two were also given punishment orders when they appeared in court for sentence.’
      • ‘He was arrested while getting on a plane to Thailand and later appeared in court.’
      • ‘There was uproar in court when the magistrates agreed to adjourn the case to a date yet to be fixed.’
      • ‘No court was in session on that day because no judge or justice of the peace was in court.’
      • ‘It is odd that you can get an acquittal, without the defendant even having to appear in court.’
      • ‘She had been charged with perjury, after claiming in court she had never set foot in there.’
      • ‘The doctor saw me hours after the incident and after I had been in court for this matter.’
      • ‘He pleaded not guilty, forcing the girl to undergo the trauma of giving evidence in court.’
      • ‘The function of the Service is limited to the presentation of the case in court.’
      • ‘A man was arrested and appeared in court after a pedestrian and his terrier were killed.’
      • ‘She had not wanted to go to the police as she knew everything would come out in court.’
      • ‘At the end of this month, he will appear in court in Edinburgh for the first sitting of his appeal.’
      • ‘He was described in court by his own barrister as a social misfit, inept in the company of adults.’
      • ‘The case was adjourned so that all three defendants could appear in court together.’
      • ‘There also are strict rules for the order in which evidence is presented in court.’
      • ‘This document may be produced in court as evidence to identify the owner or driver of the vehicle.’
      • ‘He was charged with breach of the peace, held overnight and appeared in court on Tuesday.’
      • ‘He is extremely upset and his outbursts in court have demonstrated the degree of that upset.’
      • ‘The long and short of it, is that he has to appear in court to answer the charge this week.’
      • ‘He had expressed genuine remorse and it was doubtful he would be appearing in court again.’
  • out of court

    • 1Before a legal hearing can take place.

      ‘they are trying to settle the squabble out of court’
      as modifier ‘an out-of-court settlement’
      • ‘He threatened legal action but an out of court settlement was reached.’
      • ‘If possible, the national church would prefer to resolve these disputes out of court.’
      • ‘Her mother's lawsuit resulted in a massive out of court settlement paid by the gun retailer.’
      • ‘However, I chose not to give all my money fighting in the courts and settled out of court.’
      • ‘However an out of court settlement brought a holt to proceedings the following year.’
      • ‘Three of the plaintiffs reached settlements of their cases out of court.’
      • ‘Here she is hoping the campaign doesn't get too dirty, here she is libelling her opponent and paying an out of court settlement, and here she is repeating the libel.’
      • ‘The settlement was agreed out of court and approved by a judge at the High Court in Manchester.’
      • ‘The defendant adamantly refused to settle out of court and the case went to arbitration.’
      • ‘However he fell out with his backers, which led to an out of court settlement.’
      • ‘I think the right thing to do is what I suggested a moment ago, namely, read the cases out of court and give you an answer in writing.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, it was settled out of court and the settlement wasn't made public.’
      • ‘The case was settled out of court for $2.2 million plus legal fees.’
      • ‘Both involved newspapers and were settled out of court, resulting in no case law.’
      • ‘A number of lawsuits have been settled out of court in America.’
      • ‘One of the things the legal group has been working on is the encouragement of out of court settlements in legal disputes.’
      • ‘Their plan: urge litigants to skip expensive trials and to settle out of court with the help of mediators.’
      • ‘One consequence of defining the offence so widely is that reliance is placed on prosecutorial discretion to keep minor incidents out of court.’
      • ‘We can be of assistance out of court, and especially while they're waiting for verdicts and those sort of things if they're on bail and outside.’
      • ‘In most such cases, complaints are settled out of court and writs are not issued.’
    • 2Treated as impossible or not worthy of consideration.

      ‘the price would put it out of court for most private buyers’
  • pay court to

    • Pay flattering attention to someone in order to win favor.

      • ‘He paid court to numbers of well educated and potentially well set-up women many years his junior - sometimes to the horror of their parents.’
      • ‘I was meaning to ask you if he already began paying court to you.’
      • ‘Voltaire learnt from this mistake, and preferred to pay court to the other great enlightened despot of the age, Catherine II of Russia, from a safe distance and only in writing.’
      • ‘He does not tell the women he pays court to in England about his forlorn Irish sweetheart.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, he does observe that some British leaders ‘procured the friendship of Caesar Augustus by sending embassies, and by paying court to him’.’
      • ‘Like so many others, he paid court to her and would've done anything she asked - which includes getting the drugs she needed to sustain her addiction.’
      • ‘Quirinius prudently paid court to Tiberius on Rhodes, succeeded Marcus Lollius as supervisor of Gaius Caesar, and shortly after married Aemilia Lepida, a descendant of Sulla and Pompey.’
      • ‘Otherwise, I should think I were paying court to a veritable shrew.’
      • ‘Meanwhile he is paying court to Isabelle over the weekend, hoping to carve out his own share of her family's fortune.’
      • ‘How could Alicia be attracted to that scar-faced, silent, sullen boy when a man of his calibre was paying court to her?’
      homage, deference, obedience, suit, courtship, blandishments, respects, attention, addresses
      woo, go out with, be involved with, be romantically linked with, pursue, run after, chase, seek the company of, make advances to, make up to, flirt with
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French cort, from Latin cohors, cohort- ‘yard or retinue’. The verb is influenced by Old Italian corteare, Old French courtoyer. Compare with cohort.

Pronunciation

court

/kɔrt//kôrt/