Definition of council of war in English:

council of war

noun

  • 1A gathering of military officers in wartime.

    • ‘This situation comes to a head when Talthybius, the Greek messenger, returns from the enemy camp to say that the council of war has decided to execute Hector's and Andromache's small son, who if he lived could become a danger to the Greeks.’
    • ‘Alfred, wishing to know the Vikings plans and tactics, dressed as a wandering minstrel and walked boldly into the Viking camp and snuck his way into the council of war.’
    • ‘Consider his account of the council of war convened on December 10, 1862, the night before the planned assault on the town.’
    • ‘At a council of war, the choice is to stay north to secure the Scottish throne, or go south.’
    • ‘Despite grumbling from the barons, Pelagius quickly established himself in the councils of war.’
    • ‘Officials on both sides of the Atlantic insist the emergency summit is designed to salvage what they can of their second resolution, but many believe the time for diplomacy is over and their talks will amount to a council of war.’
    • ‘I believe that this is a council of war and it'll end up with the three of them, within four hours, deciding when hostilities will begin.’
    • ‘Napoleon frowned on councils of war, as he vowed never ‘to take counsel of his fears‘.’
    • ‘During the truce that followed, Charles became the president of a council of war that began scrapping the old Habsburg military system and replacing it with one intelligently modelled on the best aspects of the French.’
    • ‘Both were among the conspirators, and would have accompanied Churchill, had he not, in consequence of what had passed at the council of war, thought it expedient to take his departure suddenly.’
    • ‘Although he joined Charles's council of war in 1629, becoming Baron Herbert of Cherbury, recognition still eluded him.’
    gathering, assembly, conference, congregation, convention, summit, forum, convocation, conclave
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A meeting held to plan a response to an emergency.
      • ‘The meeting resembled a council of war more than a parliament.’
      • ‘In my house we all went onto my room for the council of war.’
      • ‘It appears that, after the first encounter, the members of the patrol had a council of war.’
      • ‘He holds no councils of war with subordinates or staff.’
      • ‘In reality, however, the summit represents nothing less than a council of war.’
      • ‘Party members zipped in and out, bringing information about who had already voted, along with news of Liberal Democrats, ‘down from London’, who had been spotted convening a council of war in a local pub.’

Pronunciation

council of war

/ˈˌkaʊnsəl əv ˈwɔ(ə)r/