Definition of corrupt in English:

corrupt

adjective

  • 1Having or showing a willingness to act dishonestly in return for money or personal gain.

    ‘unscrupulous logging companies assisted by corrupt officials’
    • ‘I have cautioned him in the past that he could face serious, personal harm if he continued with his mission to expose illicit crime networks and corrupt official behaviour.’
    • ‘It has to do with the corrupt misuse of big money to subvert democracy.’
    • ‘This racketeering ring is aided and abetted by some corrupt police and licensing officials buttressed by some crooked bank employees.’
    • ‘Unless one of the parties gives evidence, it is a Herculean task to prove that the receipt of money was for a corrupt purpose.’
    • ‘Attempts to eradicate migration of young people for work will increase their reliance on corrupt officials and use of clandestine routes’
    • ‘I say we should ban the corrupt corporate money.’
    • ‘Contractors in connivance with corrupt officials do shoddy work deliberately, so that they get a fresh contract soon for the job.’
    • ‘While these benefited, half the money was stolen by corrupt officials.’
    • ‘One is forced to believe in rumours of corrupt officials selling quality produce to private shops for personal gain.’
    • ‘All we have noticed was that local syndicates were using corrupt government officials to defraud the state.’
    • ‘Some borrowed money was pocketed by corrupt officials.’
    • ‘Although the amount paid through companies was a little more, the stories of corrupt officials extracting money from otherwise honest taxpayers put many people off registering.’
    • ‘I call on people to report any corrupt and illegal conduct concerning an election.’
    • ‘Dirty money flowing from abroad is criminal, corrupt, or commercially tax-evading at its source.’
    • ‘It is feared that it would only serve as another slush fund for corrupt government officials and politicians.’
    • ‘‘There's an assumption that our money is dirty and corrupt,’ he said.’
    • ‘The inspection is aimed at helping curb smuggling and undervaluation practices and to nab corrupt customs officials.’
    • ‘The Review, meanwhile, was uncovering the city's underworld, its gangsters and corrupt officials, its brutality and greed.’
    • ‘I would prefer instead to create my own small business with the money that would otherwise go into the pockets of corrupt officials.’
    • ‘They are seen (because they are) as corrupt officials using their elevated social status for political gain.’
    dishonest, dishonourable, unscrupulous, unprincipled, amoral, untrustworthy, underhand, deceitful, double-dealing, disreputable, discreditable, shameful, scandalous
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    1. 1.1 Evil or morally depraved.
      ‘the play can do no harm since its audience is already corrupt’
      • ‘Exposure to extreme violence turns them into machines driven by the will to survive in a corrupt and morally decadent world.’
      • ‘I, for the most part, think they are all evil, lying, corrupt individuals.’
      • ‘There's something morally corrupt about that.’
      • ‘By implication, authorities are immoral and culture is correspondingly morally corrupt.’
      • ‘The group members confront the film industry types about their rotten films and corrupt lives.’
      • ‘It's a quality many journalists would resist, but it is a moral position as valid as any other, and is only a weakness when applied to the evil and corrupt.’
      • ‘It seems to me that we have pretty wisely recognized, over time, that in fact a person's ostensible theology tells us pretty little about how corrupt or evil he's going to be.’
      • ‘With its rhetorical poses and elaborate decoration, it was often criticised by later generations, who not only considered it bad, but also morally corrupt.’
      • ‘Well, he an astonishing man - an astonishingly corrupt and evil man.’
      • ‘He finds them incompatible; one is good, right, and pure, the other corrupt, evil, and hypocritical.’
      • ‘I hope so, as it is clearly morally corrupt to give company heads millions of pounds when they have overseen a period of business resulting in job losses and cutbacks.’
      • ‘Just how did a single man sweep a nation with a morally corrupt and evil regime.’
      • ‘Along with privilege and education, leisure brings choices, including those deemed by moralists to be evil or corrupt.’
      • ‘It's not always a dispute between right and wrong or angels and devils; it's sometimes between two evils, within the corrupt core itself.’
      • ‘It has led us to ruin; it is morally corrupt and its credibility is shot to pieces.’
      • ‘It is a morally corrupt institution run by a criminal bureaucracy.’
      • ‘Audiences had never before seen anything so noisy, so gritty, so morally corrupt - and they attended in droves.’
      • ‘They began as innocent children and were gradually rendered wicked and evil and absolutely corrupt by the treatment they received at the hands of those they most trusted!’
      • ‘Yet the main purpose of the book is to tackle perennial ethical conundrums: How do we handle prosperity without becoming morally corrupt?’
      • ‘It features a group of con artists with a modicum of honour: they only steal from the greedy and the morally corrupt.’
      sinful, ungodly, unholy, irreligious, unrighteous, profane, blasphemous, impious, impure
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  • 2(of a text or a computer database or program) made unreliable by errors or alterations.

    • ‘The text is believed to be corrupt, the manuscript tradition poor, and the editor on a tea-break.’
    • ‘This is most amusing and shows how captive the Revisers are to their corrupt text.’
    • ‘Although the Arabic text is slightly corrupt at both places where this person's name is mentioned, that is the only plausible way to read the name.’
    • ‘It has become a corrupt text, with countless additions, cuts and changes ossifying into tradition over the years.’
    • ‘The doctrine is greatly harmed here by the corrupt text.’
    • ‘Only corrupt manuscripts can produce so many departures.’
    • ‘The traditional explanation for this was that their texts are extremely corrupt as a result of their reconstruction from memory by a member, or members, of their cast.’
    • ‘Those who wrote the corrupt manuscripts had no trouble with the other commandments shown here.’
    • ‘The text is corrupt and broken, and the original books, apparently eight in number, have a disturbed sequence.’
    • ‘Though one may quibble at some of O'Brien's choices in this free adaptation, she gives force and clarity to a notoriously corrupt text and rescues the ending from tricksy bathos.’
  • 3archaic (of organic or inorganic matter) in a state of decay; rotten or putrid.

    ‘a corrupt and rotting corpse’
    • ‘A vintner found selling corrupt wine was forced to drink it, then banned from the trade.’
    • ‘When the cell divides, the corrupt protein is contained in both daughter cells, where it seeds the process again.’
    • ‘Attitudes about nature as backdrop, commodity, enemy have been dug out and re-animated as if they were not ancient corpses moldering and corrupt.’
    • ‘The food and water are so corrupt that a Western traveler is almost guaranteed sickness.’
    • ‘The first of the non-naturals was the consideration of air: good air encouraged and maintained good health, while corrupt air could throw the humours out of balance and cause illness.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Cause to act dishonestly in return for money or personal gain.

    ‘there is a continuing fear of firms corrupting politicians in the search for contracts’
    • ‘The author's focus on how money corrupts the political process is dead right, of course, but it's hardly original.’
    • ‘While I agree that both parties are almost hopelessly corrupted by corporate money and power, the hope for a viable third party here is still very slim.’
    • ‘And afterwards I became more like I was before I'd been corrupted by all that money and excess.’
    • ‘The masses are too immersed in suspicions that money has corrupted sports beyond hope.’
    • ‘He was a frugal man himself and he feared that the money would corrupt both his family and the strict religious principles of his regime.’
    • ‘Congress itself saw that the money flow needed to be stemmed, for the money was corrupting the process.’
    • ‘Both are corrupted by corporate money almost beyond redemption.’
    • ‘I can look to my brother to see how the lust for that money can corrupt an entire personality.’
    • ‘All governments and politicians are corrupted by power.’
    • ‘As a celebrity, I became corrupted by sex and money.’
    • ‘Thomsby's concerns weren't based solely on his fear that power would corrupt most individuals, although that was a very real possibility.’
    • ‘When you have so many bureaucrats and human beings corrupted by money, the problems pile up.’
    • ‘Essentially it was a modern and very predictable parable about - yes you've guessed it - how the beautiful game has been corrupted by money.’
    • ‘Money corrupts the process, of course, but voters have let that happen, let rich people and organizations have an influence on the process that ordinary folks can't match.’
    • ‘All three deal with the way money corrupts people, but more specifically, how every transaction in life is based on money and how the intersection of money and personal relationships destroys or, at very best, warps everyone's life.’
    • ‘To avoid being corrupted by money in this manner, we simply remove it from the equation.’
    • ‘Macbeth, honest and humble, was corrupted by the powers of fortune.’
    • ‘I may have an impoverished imagination, but the only explanation that seems to fit is the mundane power of money to corrupt one's beliefs.’
    • ‘Far from money corrupting our appreciation of art, it often opens up important questions of quality and critical esteem.’
    • ‘It destroys your moral power abroad; it corrupts your politicians at home.’
    bribe, suborn, buy, buy off, pay off
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    1. 1.1 Cause to become morally depraved.
      ‘he has corrupted the boy’
      • ‘This power soon corrupted them and people were put to death for daring to disobey the laws.’
      • ‘Her acts of horror and blasphemy indicate she became corrupted by the evil power.’
      • ‘We cannot be trusted with domination, becoming too easily corrupted by its power and too often succumbing to repression in defending it.’
      • ‘It can become corrupted by power and privilege.’
      • ‘Outside forces like the press and media could corrupt the young boy, and John wished his son to have the most normal of childhoods, in light of the circumstances.’
      • ‘There's no way you'll hear me saying, ‘dishonesty at any level corrupts the individual’, or find me stalking birds around the garden.’
      • ‘It is interesting how world power has corrupted this country.’
      • ‘Inevitably power will corrupt its possessor - but some may resist its corrupting effect for longer than others.’
      • ‘This Ring, ‘the Ring to rule them all’, had the power to corrupt any person who possessed it.’
      • ‘Ostensibly, we are protecting minors from being morally corrupted by adults?’
      • ‘I was drawn astray by the promise of power, and it corrupted my poor mind.’
      • ‘Here's hoping fame doesn't corrupt them, because these boys are bound to go very far indeed.’
      • ‘On the other hand, the jury may have thought that they could convict only if the book tended to deprave and corrupt the average reader or the majority of its readers.’
      • ‘But they are increasing their power, slowly corrupting the very foundations of the world and even the hearts of men.’
      • ‘The moral consideration of Animal Farm is that power corrupts people.’
      • ‘It is morally devastating and corrupts men by cumulative temptation.’
      • ‘Media companies are ruining democracy and corrupting our public life.’
      • ‘Further, he is a wrongdoer in corrupting the young.’
      • ‘Having power in the government corrupted them.’
      • ‘This is bad, for they are already being corrupted by their own power and I fear I'm now powerless to resist - that's why I'm cowering away in this place.’
      pervert, debauch, deprave, warp, subvert, make degenerate, lead astray, debase, degrade, defile, sully, infect, influence
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  • 2Change or debase by making errors or unintentional alterations.

    ‘Epicurus's teachings have since been much corrupted’
    • ‘A message entirely without redundancy may contain the maximum amount of information, but cannot be corrected if it is corrupted in some way, because there is no ‘spare’ material to check with.’
    • ‘Third, people can betray the work that they have been given by doing it poorly or dishonestly and corrupting the final product.’
    • ‘We can get angry about it, complaining that the perfect language of our childhood is being corrupted by ignorance and carelessness, but we can't stop it happening.’
    • ‘But then Redmond apparently got wind of the survey, and the innocent poll was swiftly corrupted.’
    • ‘As we speak, Esperanto is being corrupted by upstart languages.’
    • ‘The process of market research has been corrupted by paid research.’
    alter, falsify, manipulate, tamper with, interfere with, tinker with, doctor, distort
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    1. 2.1 Cause errors to appear in (a computer program or database)
      ‘a program that has somehow corrupted your system files’
      • ‘You also run the risk of corrupting the data when writing back to the legacy database, since many applications have data that is updated from batch applications.’
      • ‘Since I was unable to ‘shut down’ properly, the hard drive would corrupt itself again, and the whole operation would repeat indefinitely.’
      • ‘The manufacturers found that by corrupting the error correction codes, they could make a CD that computers would reject, but that normal CD players would still manage to play.’
      • ‘How many machines may be corrupted by the software before people become aware of the problem doesn't bear thinking about.’
      • ‘This too fell over midway through copying, again corrupting the target CD.’
      • ‘Do not develop and test new modules on a production machine, and test modules thoroughly to ensure they do not destabilize your system or corrupt your data.’
      • ‘Server downtime costs money, so nothing that might corrupt a byte here or a bit there and cause a crash can be tolerated.’
      • ‘Initially, the damage would probably be limited and relatively minor: perhaps spam messaging or corrupting data.’
      • ‘There are also other types of technology that can be corrupted and optimised by spyware.’
      • ‘The computer had managed to corrupt the program somehow, and the entire machine will have to be ‘refreshed.’’
      • ‘His system processes accounting information but frequently crashes, corrupting the database.’
      • ‘Only then was it discovered that the virus had also corrupted the remote site's computer - meaning all copies of the source code were lost.’
      • ‘That corrupted the data in its operational databases.’
      • ‘I have had some reports of errors in motherboards which corrupted a particular address of physical memory, perhaps due to a short circuit with an on-board peripheral.’
      • ‘The bug is not thought to erase or corrupt information on the handsets, but may force users to turn the phone off and on again.’
      • ‘According to company sources, the intruders had access for only 12 days, not six weeks as first reported, and did not corrupt any software in development.’
      • ‘After the installation the virus then corrupts the handset's software and sends a multimedia message service to all the contact numbers in the contaminated cellphone.’
      • ‘This prevents servers from accessing storage resources not allocated to them, which could potentially corrupt valuable data.’
      • ‘Even more diabolically, it kept finding and disabling or corrupting my anti-virus software, although it took me a little while to figure this out.’
      • ‘Not only can hardware failures occur, but viruses can also corrupt data making it impossible to retrieve.’
  • 3archaic Infect; contaminate.

    ‘the corrupting smell of death’
    bribe, suborn, buy, buy off, pay off
    pervert, debauch, deprave, warp, subvert, make degenerate, lead astray, debase, degrade, defile, sully, infect, influence
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Latin corruptus, past participle of corrumpere ‘mar, bribe, destroy’, from cor- ‘altogether’ + rumpere ‘to break’.

Pronunciation

corrupt

/kəˈrəpt//kəˈrəpt/