Definition of correct in English:

correct

adjective

  • 1Free from error; in accordance with fact or truth.

    ‘make sure you have been given the correct information’
    • ‘Their criticism could in principle be correct, but in fact doesn't describe real scientists.’
    • ‘I am sure his facts are correct regarding the problems which occurred last year.’
    • ‘Not that what we are seeing is all true or even mostly true, but the basic facts are correct.’
    • ‘Without the ability to gather correct information and facts a free person cannot make decisions and choices.’
    • ‘They want to kill the messenger although he is speaking the truth and his facts are correct.’
    • ‘Improved access to information about the correct site would minimize the risk of error.’
    • ‘I know that many of them are lying, but some of the facts were correct.’
    • ‘Of cause, I thank Lisa for putting out the article, and they have done a great job to make sure the facts are correct.’
    • ‘I do, however, believe that the debate would be more productive if the initial facts were correct.’
    • ‘I have always been under the impression that an author must have correct facts to back a story.’
    • ‘If errors are detected, provide the assessment authorities with the correct information as soon as possible.’
    • ‘The correct nutrition facts are now on all one pound containers being produced.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, there is no index, or references, and not all the historical facts seem correct.’
    • ‘The templates help ensure that the correct information is in fact recorded and stored.’
    • ‘Utilising software to manage your accounts is also the best way to ensure that the books are correct and reliably free of errors.’
    • ‘This perception is correct, because statistical errors are common.’
    • ‘Just make sure you use the correct facts before you say them.’
    • ‘That decision, as I shall endeavour to explain in due course, may well have been correct on its facts, but in my view it is of no assistance to the defendant in the present case.’
    right, accurate, true, veracious, exact, precise, unerring, faithful, strict, faultless, flawless, errorless, error-free, perfect, word-perfect, scrupulous, meticulous
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    1. 1.1 Not mistaken in one's opinion or judgment; right.
      ‘the government was correct to follow a course of defeating inflation’
      • ‘I think that the administration was correct in postponing it because of some due process concerns.’
      • ‘We are of the opinion that Mr Sheldon is correct in his submissions.’
      • ‘Professor Diamond is correct in saying we should learn from history and avoid, if possible, repeating the same mistakes over again.’
      • ‘This is what many of us wish could happen, and I suspect that Epstein may be correct in theory.’
      • ‘The Foreign Ministry is correct in its reasoning that the company appointed to destroy the missiles is an international one of some repute.’
      • ‘He said a report before a cabinet committee would indicate that the government was correct in saying it needed to be very careful about this.’
      • ‘In my opinion, his Honour was correct in holding that it might be unconscionable to depart from those assumptions.’
      • ‘I think your comments are correct in general but wrong as to Holmes.’
      • ‘He is correct in what he is saying but then partnerships, synergy and leverage are common business tools.’
      • ‘They were correct in their judgement not to rush into a quick decision in appointing the new man.’
      • ‘On that basis the Applicant is correct in calculating the children's entitlement as follows.’
      • ‘He was correct in his approach here again, I think.’
      • ‘Both senators are correct in their respective positions.’
      • ‘Last week's decision to end the excessively generous superannuation benefits for MPs was correct in principle.’
      • ‘He is correct in pointing out that biodiesel is cleaner burning, but he is wrong to state that it is a newer technology.’
      • ‘The Court of Appeal, in our opinion, was correct in applying the dicta of the Acting Chief Justice and did so without error.’
      • ‘If they were correct in their opinion, then the Constitution is on their side.’
      • ‘It's not that I think his analysis is correct in every respect.’
      • ‘To the letter of the law, the judgement may well have been correct in Queensland law, despite a possibly harsh sentence.’
      • ‘Okay, so he may have been correct in his criticism.’
      right, accurate, true, veracious, exact, precise, unerring, faithful, strict, faultless, flawless, errorless, error-free, perfect, word-perfect, scrupulous, meticulous
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 (of a thing or course of action) meeting the requirements of or most appropriate for a particular situation or activity.
      ‘cut the top and bottom tracks to the correct length with a hacksaw’
      • ‘Always make sure that the spark plug is the correct length for the engine.’
      • ‘Survivability may hinge on the use of the correct technique appropriate to the environment you are fighting in.’
      • ‘Voters were redirected where appropriate to their correct polling places.’
      • ‘In all truth, using the correct anchor is only important if you don't want to drift away.’
      • ‘Start with trying to find the loft that's right for you, along with the correct shaft flex and length.’
      • ‘Please co-operate by only depositing the correct recyclables in the appropriate containers.’
      • ‘I strongly suggest you do a mock install to properly measure the correct tubing length, and to make sure everything properly fits.’
      • ‘Hopefully, this will help you in getting a better understanding of the situation and making the correct decision.’
      • ‘When the library receives a media request from an application, it mounts the appropriate cartridge to the correct drive.’
      • ‘Gone is the need to manually set the VCR whilst separately ensuring the cable box is on the correct channel at the appropriate time.’
      • ‘The jacket and trousers are the correct length and it's good quality.’
      • ‘They can also have to go to great lengths to source the correct fabric for a period.’
      • ‘Therefore the choice of the correct or appropriate mode of internationalization or market entry is strategically important.’
      • ‘When you discuss any type of a response to a violent encounter, you need to think in terms of using the correct tool for the situation.’
      • ‘Here is where the real-time requirements become critical for correct game operation.’
      • ‘The correct length of a buttonhole is determined by the diameter, thickness and type of button used.’
      • ‘So by combining the correct number of the appropriate ions an electrically neutral compound is produced.’
      • ‘Once the length is correct and your boot snaps into the binding correctly, setting everything else is easy.’
      • ‘Once you've got a rough idea of where you want everything to go, measure up your tubing and cut yourself the correct lengths.’
      • ‘To get the correct arrow length, use a long arrow and draw the bow to full draw.’
    3. 1.3 (of a person or their appearance or behavior) conforming to accepted social standards; proper.
      ‘he was a polite man, invariably correct and pleasant with Mrs. Collins’
      • ‘In a normal society something like Hooke's Law would operate on them as they veered out of the groove of correct behaviour.’
      • ‘Just as Paul saw himself as exemplifying the correct behaviour, so also he saw himself as the model of exertion.’
      • ‘Therefore, while we are not always to blame for their behavior, we are correct to feel responsible.’
      • ‘Dr Arderne gives advice on medical procedures, cures and potions and correct deportment for doctors.’
      • ‘These phrases are a demand that individuals submit to a code for correct behaviour.’
      • ‘He is the fountain-head of good manners and correct social behaviour as well as the ultimate spiritual and ethical guide.’
      proper, seemly, decorous, decent, respectable, right, suitable, fit, fitting, befitting, appropriate, apt
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    4. 1.4North American Conforming to a particular political or ideological orthodoxy.
      • ‘Though for the most part politically left of center, they refuse to abide by the heavy jargon of correct political thinking.’
      • ‘Our political etiquette is correct, but our theory is not so perfect.’
      • ‘Those wearing different coloured clothing or growing their hair long were seen as having problems with correct political thinking.’
      • ‘This means it cannot be treated as general news; the correct political line must be observed.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Put right (an error or fault)

    ‘the Council issued a statement correcting some points in the press reports’
    • ‘When I tried to get the seller to either correct the faults or refund me my money, he tried to brush me off.’
    • ‘Even the British Standards Institution has decided not to issue a press release to correct the misunderstanding.’
    • ‘How it has taken almost a month to correct whatever fault that has rendered the traffic lights at this dangerous junction inoperable is beyond me.’
    • ‘First, let us correct a mistake that was in our NFL preview issue.’
    • ‘Over time, the system tends to correct its own mistakes.’
    • ‘It is necessary, at the outset, to correct some misconceptions about the issue of corruption.’
    • ‘Phil has corrected some typos on those satellite photos.’
    • ‘However, only one of the faults was corrected, it emerged yesterday.’
    • ‘Employers should check the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems and correct any faults.’
    • ‘After determining the error, they use another series of pulses to correct the mistake.’
    • ‘For this reason I do not have time to correct any typos or add links.’
    • ‘It is only right that a few myths and misunderstandings are corrected.’
    • ‘As contractors worked to correct the fault, commuters and business traffic faced long tail-backs and delays.’
    • ‘Mr. Arnold later published an erratum sheet correcting the error.’
    • ‘Engineers are very anxious to learn of its findings and to begin to correct the faults of the main water supply line from up north in New York State down to the City.’
    • ‘Residents of neighbouring Brandon Grove are without electricity for two hours tonight while the fault is corrected.’
    • ‘I have now corrected the typo ‘missages’ in the last paragraph of my last post.’
    • ‘Under the old system the Council was able to correct errors in an application by simply contacting the applicant.’
    • ‘She also corrects small misconceptions that have been propagated in the many existing potted biographies of Franklin.’
    • ‘This allows me to meet each student outside of lecture, correct misunderstandings, and catch errors in the forms.’
    rectify, put right, set right, right, amend, emend, remedy, redress, cure, square, make good, improve, better, ameliorate, repair, revise, alter, edit, rewrite, redraft, rescript, reword, rework
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    1. 1.1 Mark the errors in (a written or printed text)
      ‘he corrected Dixon's writing for publication’
      • ‘The test is corrected automatically, and the results are sent to cardholders and program managers simultaneously.’
      • ‘We are grateful to J. Eckart for correcting the English text.’
      • ‘It was tedious work and the more I corrected it and rewrote it, the more mistakes I found.’
      • ‘The other was the plump man who had used the machine to correct his test.’
      • ‘Muriel meanwhile went into her office and started correcting some spelling tests from earlier that day.’
      • ‘The proofreader then corrects the text and the editor looks through it again and makes the final changes.’
      • ‘All of the exams are automatically set and corrected, which dramatically reduces the administration.’
      • ‘After roll was done and all the students were accounted for the Professor started passing out the corrected tests.’
      • ‘Though Ernst says he repeatedly offered to correct the text free of charge, his overtures were rejected.’
      • ‘If at home, he is correcting the drafts of students, and burning the midnight oil.’
      • ‘Mr. Stilts waited patiently, correcting papers or tests at his desk.’
      • ‘As for the teacher who was correcting books when it took place, he was relieved no one was hurt in the school.’
      • ‘However, he also pointed out many people were unaware of the work of sub-editors, who corrected and improved copy.’
      • ‘The last thing a teacher wants to do while correcting mounds of tests is to spend time deciphering what a student has illegibly written.’
      indicate errors in, show mistakes in, point out faults in
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    2. 1.2 Tell (someone) that they are mistaken.
      ‘he had assumed she was married and she had not corrected him’
      ‘sorry, I stand corrected’
      • ‘I correct people all over the shop and I don't care what they think.’
      • ‘I am quick to correct the person and explain that I am definitely not on a diet.’
      • ‘At any rate, I now find myself in the position of being much like my friend, correcting people and scoffing at them behind their back.’
      • ‘I had originally thought it was Dutch, but a reader corrected me.’
      • ‘I stand corrected by Justin, Arbiter of Absolute Truth in Minor Jokes.’
      • ‘I just don't like it, and normally correct people immediately.’
      • ‘I think it's funny to correct people when they're not necessarily wrong.’
      • ‘Everyone referred to us a couple, and after awhile we didn't bother to correct people.’
      • ‘Karyn, thanks for correcting me back there as well.’
      • ‘Or maybe she corrected him in front of a customer.’
      • ‘No child was corrected on the spot for mistakes committed during conversations.’
      • ‘Howard sips claret from a picnic hamper as he corrects other people's mistakes.’
      • ‘If you make a mistake, you are corrected gently, and promptly in a helpful way.’
      • ‘But it was only during my recent tour of Europe that I realized how awkward it could be if you have to correct people again and again on where you are from.’
      • ‘But I call upon any antepost dog experts in the audience to correct me if I'm mistaken.’
      • ‘He corrects him: it's not a set of laws, but a sense of the rule of law.’
      • ‘By the way, for over 20 years I've called him Louis, and I'm now corrected.’
      • ‘He prided himself on, you know, correcting people, on knowing things like that.’
      • ‘It's not my job to correct people who base themselves on misinformation.’
      • ‘I got a lot of messages correcting me about the color of wedding dresses.’
      scold, rebuke, chide, reprimand, reprove, admonish, lecture, berate, chastise, castigate
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    3. 1.3 Counteract or rectify.
      ‘the problem of diminished sight can be reduced or corrected by wearing eyeglasses’
      • ‘Had the screening been performed properly, a single sperm from the man would have been isolated and genetically altered to correct the defect.’
      • ‘Other individual birth defects - such as eye or heart defects - sometimes can be corrected or at least improved with early surgery.’
      • ‘This is not to disregard the importance of treating the etiology of CHF by improving coronary circulation or correcting valvular abnormalities.’
      • ‘Soon it may be feasible to correct genetic disease or alter the genetic machinery of cells in a way that may be used to treat cancer or other acquired diseases.’
      • ‘Therefore, income splitting for couples with dependent children rectifies and corrects a fundamental anomaly in the present tax system.’
      • ‘Hypermetropia, or long-sightedness, is corrected by spectacles with convex lenses that make the eyes appear larger, as shown in the photograph.’
      • ‘When hearing loss cannot be corrected medically or surgically, the patient is forced to wear a hearing aid.’
      • ‘The first use of spectacles for correcting long-sightedness has been traced to Italy, towards the end of the 13th century.’
      • ‘No doubt schools could do a lot to correct this sort of misapprehension.’
      • ‘Surgery can correct myopia by altering the shape of the cornea.’
      • ‘It seems Reese thinks he's not handsome enough and must correct some sort of minor orthodontic imperfection.’
      • ‘Tony has provided Andrei with spectacles to correct the cast he has in one eye and thinks he will be able to improve the sight in the other eye as well.’
      • ‘To add to her misery, she has had to start wearing spectacles to correct her eyesight.’
      • ‘In some cases, the problem can be corrected by wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses.’
      • ‘In an effort to further define the metabolic disorder and correct the anemia, iron was administered intravenously.’
      • ‘Nobel counters and corrects a lot of PR-driven conventional wisdom about the plans, designs, objectives, and personalities that dominated the redevelopment process.’
      • ‘It is most often corrected with eyeglasses or surgery.’
      • ‘I've done this operation before to correct the same sort of irregularity in the heart.’
      • ‘Once corrected, iron stores can be maintained with an iron-rich diet.’
      • ‘We have surgical procedures and spectacles to correct impaired vision.’
      counteract, offset, counterbalance, compensate for, make up for, neutralize
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    4. 1.4 Adjust (an instrument) to function accurately or accord with a standard.
      ‘motorists can have their headlights tested and corrected at a reduced price on Saturday’
      • ‘When instruments or reagents were the cause of the problems, we corrected the function of the instruments or reagents and reanalyzed the specimens.’
      • ‘Each day, the Observatory took stellar readings to correct the Standard Clock.’
      • ‘We corrected our instruments and completed the rest of the transition with that question in the back of our craniums.’
      • ‘When necessary, the instrument location was corrected by matching the observed and computed primary and first multiple water-wave arrivals.’
      • ‘In 1881 Tait published an important paper on the topic in which he showed how to correct the temperature readings because of the high pressures on the thermometers.’
      adjust, regulate, fix, set, set right, set to rights, standardize, normalize, calibrate, fine-tune, make good, put in working order, overhaul
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    5. 1.5 Adjust (a numerical result or reading) to allow for departure from standard conditions.
      ‘data were corrected for radionuclide decay’
      • ‘However, we note that neither test retains significance after correcting for multiple comparisons over genes.’
      • ‘We observed that correcting for multiple tests has a strong impact on the signal of the single-point analysis.’
      • ‘Erythrocyte folate results were corrected for the subjects' hematocrits and serum folate concentrations.’
      • ‘It should be noted that these data are corrected for the temperature dependence of the water saturation deficit and thus describe the temperature effect on cuticular transport properties exclusively.’
      • ‘Results were corrected for this recovery percentage.’
      • ‘If the rate curve for a particular taxonomic group can be accurately estimated, it can be a useful tool for correcting divergence date estimates by taking the rate decay into account.’
      • ‘The results were corrected for both VA and hemoglobin.’
      • ‘The resulting probabilities were then multiplied by 3 to correct for multiple tests.’
      • ‘Of course, if we correct for quality improvements and treat replacement sales as new sales, the picture looks quite different.’
      • ‘All other contrasts were performed as Tukey-Kramer tests, which correct for multiple comparisons.’
      • ‘Summing across loci we observe significantly more synonymous substitutions along the D. melanogaster lineage even after correcting for multiple tests.’
      • ‘Since the two monolayers were free to move relative to each other, the obtained mean square displacements were corrected by the center of mass motion of the respective monolayers.’
      • ‘Readings were corrected for area of the illuminated spot and the wavelength sensitivity of the meter.’
      • ‘Hence, we present the values along with our primary results, which are corrected for spatial autocorrelation.’
      • ‘This pressure reading was corrected for the pressure drop caused by the latter sampling.’
      • ‘However, after correcting for multiple tests, none of these correlations were significant.’
      • ‘Data were also added from a New South Wales specimen and the result was corrected for logarithmic transformation bias.’
      • ‘Overdispersion in the data was corrected by testing the fit of the model using the F statistic rather than chi square.’
      • ‘Equality of variances was checked by Bartlett's test, and corrected where required by taking square roots of the raw data.’
      • ‘If some or all of the samples come from the same deme, the PRF results must be corrected for the effect of drift and migration within demes.’

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): from Latin correct- ‘made straight, amended’, from the verb corrigere, from cor- ‘together’ + regere ‘guide’. The adjective is via French.

Pronunciation

correct

/kəˈrɛkt//kəˈrekt/