Definition of corporeal in US English:

corporeal

adjective

  • 1Relating to a person's body, especially as opposed to their spirit.

    ‘he was frank about his corporeal appetites’
    • ‘While she pines on her sick bed, her soul rises from her body, takes corporeal form and pursues the departing student.’
    • ‘In its exploration of the corporeal body the play insists on the integral relationship between love, food and sex for the maintenance of a healthy body and a healthy body politic.’
    • ‘We have a biological existence, through which we experience the vital values of creature comforts, physical ease, agreeableness, adaptability and corporeal pleasures.’
    • ‘We care for their corporeal and spiritual growth.’
    • ‘I could argue that if you had a sufficient outlet for expressing your true selves in your fleshly, corporeal lives, then your blogs would be redundant.’
    • ‘Thomas says very clearly and implies very clearly that the resurrection of Christ was not a corporeal resurrection, but a spiritual resurrection.’
    • ‘The depictions of corporeal decay delineate the destiny of the physical body and portray the mysterious transitional state between this and the other worlds.’
    • ‘They also believed that there were two Gods: a Good God, who created the spirit, and a Bad God who created all corporeal matter.’
    • ‘What becomes of your spirit while your corporeal remains decay?’
    • ‘Laban studied corporeal movement in notably impersonal terms, disciplining bodies even as he asked them to pulse with new life.’
    • ‘Sargon seems intent on regaining a corporeal body, but is satisfied living as a spirit at the end of the episode.’
    • ‘In this way More sought to demonstrate that the idea of incorporeal substance, or spirit, was as intelligible as that of corporeal substance, i.e. body.’
    • ‘It was fraught with language inadequate to genital specificity, a language of the one-sex body in which corporeal difference threatened always to collapse into sameness.’
    • ‘The locus of acts of memory is corporeal, in and through the body.’
    • ‘He felt the body reel inwardly, weakening as his anger surfaced, stressing the spell that held the body in corporeal form.’
    • ‘Or, you create a psychic projection so you can explore separate from your corporeal body - which also has the handy side effect of allowing you to possess guards.’
    • ‘What photography mummifies, distorts and murders, among other things, is the sense that the reality of the self resides in the body, the corporeal and temporal boundaries of personhood.’
    • ‘Are we talking about something we can't even imagine, a non corporeal spiritual existence.’
    • ‘If we use our corporeal bodies to interpret the world around us, this second body is the matrix by which we interpret our metaphysics.’
    • ‘Does the fragmentation of her body undo any sense of corporeal affinity we might feel, and so foreclose the possibility of identification?’
    bodily, corporal, fleshly, in the flesh
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    1. 1.1 Having a body.
      ‘a corporeal God’
      • ‘All beings in nature, corporeal or spiritual, are made up of combinations and rhythms of the Elements.’
      • ‘It says that human beings are made by God as corporeal or bodily beings.’
      bodily, fleshly, carnal, corporal, human, mortal, earthly
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    2. 1.2Law Consisting of material objects; tangible.
      ‘corporeal property’
      • ‘The proper law governing the transfer of corporeal movable property is the lex situs.’
      • ‘This concept is complementary to another well-known legal doctrine, namely, that money cannot be owned in the same way as corporeal property.’
      • ‘Property includes the rights in and to any movable property, immovable property, corporeal and incorporeal property.’
      • ‘Having defined hereditaments as inheritable interests, the common law went on to distinguish between corporeal and incorporeal hereditaments.’
      • ‘Goods: will probably include corporeal movable things, fixed property and any real rights relating thereto.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘material’): from late Latin corporealis, from Latin corporeus ‘bodily, physical’, from corpus, corpor- ‘body’.

Pronunciation

corporeal

/kɔrˈpɔriəl//kôrˈpôrēəl/