Definition of cornerstone in English:

cornerstone

noun

  • 1An important quality or feature on which a particular thing depends or is based.

    ‘a national minimum wage remained the cornerstone of policy’
    • ‘Almost half a century since Feynman's discoveries, they remain cornerstones of theoretical physics.’
    • ‘Our system of GPs is a cornerstone of quality health care.’
    • ‘Few would deny that education is one of the most important cornerstones of all human societies.’
    • ‘Despite their adolescence, it is on these countries that the United States depends as a cornerstone of its energy policy.’
    • ‘Pride, dedication, and quality are the three cornerstones on which the company operates.’
    • ‘He said food safety was not negotiable and producers could simply not afford to compromise on hygiene, the cornerstone of quality.’
    • ‘Family-owned businesses will continue to be an important cornerstone of the American business landscape.’
    • ‘In patients with diastolic dysfunction, the cornerstones of treatment depend on the underlying cause.’
    • ‘Achieving these goals is an important cornerstone for the city to transform itself into a viable and vibrant city, a city in which its citizens will live with pride.’
    • ‘Offering courses accessible to students around the state is in fact an important cornerstone of the North Dakota University System.’
    • ‘First, you left out one of the most important cornerstones of most any combat engagement we've had for the last 30 years.’
    • ‘In building the structures and resources for nursing research, the development of a scientific community for nurse researchers is an important cornerstone.’
    • ‘I've been thinking about this some more, and I've come to the conclusion that these four qualities are also the cornerstone of all good web sites.’
    • ‘This ritual educated me in some of the most important cornerstones of life: family, friends, and firewater.’
    • ‘All of these factors are important, but the cornerstone of any preservation system is the ability to say no to demolition.’
    • ‘Yoga will continue to remain an important cornerstone, but I really need to make more time for weight training.’
    • ‘Written goals and ongoing evaluation serve as the cornerstone of another important facet: documentation.’
    • ‘‘Majority rule’ is an important cornerstone of democracy.’
    • ‘Wong's structure will not provide shade but a vision that represents three important cornerstones of our university community: students, businesses and faculty.’
    • ‘Italy's membership of NATO will remain the cornerstone of the country's security and defence policy.’
    foundation, basis, keystone, mainspring, mainstay, linchpin, bedrock, fundament, base, key, fundamental principle, main ingredient, central component, centrepiece, core, heart, centre, focus, crux, prop, backbone, anchor
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  • 2A stone that forms the base of a corner of a building, joining two walls.

    • ‘These are cornerstones, flint stones, millstones, limestone, and milestones.’
    • ‘If the cornerstone is not laid properly, a building will not stand properly.’
    • ‘The cornerstone is so important that often it is inscribed and laid in an official ceremony that marks the beginning of a building's construction.’
    • ‘Usually, I touch the cornerstones on the buildings, but Aunt Issa had said men would know I am a child from my hands and such a childish move.’
    • ‘This is the cornerstone that must be laid carefully or the building will fall under the slightest duress.’
    • ‘A stone is also symbolic of eternity, like the cornerstone of a building, placed to last for all time.’
    • ‘Only the cornerstone of the building had been laid when the engraving was made.’
    • ‘The recent case where a cornerstone of Taipei's old city wall was cut and used for a public art project has sparked debate among artists and cultural experts.’
    • ‘‘Paul Kariya is like the cornerstone of a building; you build around him,’ Gauthier says.’
    • ‘Much like modern buildings, the pyramid's cornerstones have balls and sockets built into them.’
    • ‘For instance a corner of the mansion may have thirteen cornerstones going up its spine, and the level of the front door is three cornerstones above ground level.’

Pronunciation

cornerstone

/ˈkôrnərˌstōn//ˈkɔrnərˌstoʊn/