Main definitions of corn in English

: corn1corn2

corn1

noun

  • 1A North American cereal plant that yields large grains, or kernels, set in rows on a cob. Its many varieties yield numerous products, highly valued for both human and livestock consumption.

    Also called Indian corn
    • ‘The best land in America produces two low-value commodity crops that are rarely directly consumed by humans - corn and soybeans.’
    • ‘According to Goldberg, 75% of the corn planted this year will be of the conventional variety.’
    • ‘In the present study, corn plants were not partitioned into grain, cob, stalk, and leaves.’
    • ‘So no special corn varieties have had to be planted just for ethanol production, Nelson says.’
    • ‘Although APHIS inspectors saw the corn plants and told the farmer to remove them before the soybean field was harvested, that didn't happen.’
    • ‘Having grown up on a working farm I can tell you that much, if not most, corn grown is for livestock feed and not humans.’
    • ‘To scout for bacterial soft rot fungal injury in corn, dissect the plant down to the growing point.’
    • ‘A relatively colorless oil, it is produced by pressing the endosperm of the corn kernel.’
    • ‘He pocketed the money he would have spent on buying the heavy metal, as well as his labor to plant and harvest the corn.’
    • ‘The problem is that human beings are not like stalks of corn planted in poor soil.’
    • ‘Initially corn was a garden plant valued for early maturity and easy food preparation.’
    • ‘It seems that everyone is talking about ethanol these days, spurring great expectations for corn and grain producers.’
    • ‘The kernel is the fruit produced from the corn flower, and each kernel contains an embryo that may develop into a new corn plant.’
    • ‘Much of the corn was planted last week in Phelps County and a good amount was planted in Gosper County.’
    • ‘In addition to providing food, the corn plants were used to make a variety of other goods.’
    • ‘The corn carries a mutant gene that confers resistance to a specific herbicide, leaving the corn plant unharmed when treated with this herbicide.’
    • ‘Even if we plant the seeds like corn and beans too early they will go bad before they have a chance to germinate.’
    • ‘One-quarter of all corn planted in the United States is now modified to produce the Bt toxin.’
    • ‘In fact, ginseng was one of the first plants traded at a profit by early European pioneers in North America, not better known plants like corn and tobacco.’
    • ‘I don't hunt, climb mountains or go around planting stray stalks of corn.’
    sweetcorn, maize, corn on the cob, indian corn
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The grains of this.
      ‘creamed corn’
      ‘two ears of corn’
      • ‘Two ears of Long Island corn, slathered in butter and salt.’
      • ‘By sticking an ear of dried corn on top, he lured squirrels to charge up the board and then spin around for a dizzying ride.’
      • ‘Zein is a corn protein making up about half of the protein found in the corn kernel.’
      • ‘Indigenous Mexicans believe that God created humanity from an ear of corn and call themselves ‘people of maize’.’
      • ‘I waded through enough surf-and-turfs and enough creamed corn to last a lifetime.’
      • ‘In a pot, bring cream, milk and corn to a boil.’
      • ‘Add the corn kernels, garlic, and shallot and sauté until tender, about 30 seconds.’
      • ‘Had my child not been in my arms, I probably would have dragged you out of your cart and shoved my ear of hot buttered corn down your red neck.’
      • ‘Add the corn kernels and simmer until tender, about five minutes.’
      • ‘His challenge was to eat creamed corn and cod liver oil.’
      • ‘The moisture inside the corn kernels was expanding, violently bursting out of the hard shells.’
      • ‘Cover the kernels with the corn stock by one inch, reserving the remaining stock for the garnish.’
      • ‘Using a grater set over a bowl, grate the corn kernels off the cobs.’
      • ‘There were separate spoons for soup, corn, and ice cream.’
      • ‘Push the corn kernels to the side of the pan; add the sugar and allow the sugar to caramelize.’
      • ‘I look over at Mory, who is pushing around a corn kernel with her fork.’
      • ‘Lin served Lannie; dinner consisted of roast beef, cream corn, beans, mashed potatoes and a tall glass of tropical Kool-aid.’
      • ‘As she walked into the kitchen The Captain was just in the process of heaping handfuls of the kernels into the corn popper that was already heated up.’
      • ‘Christopher says his biggest failure was cream corn.’
      • ‘Popcorn has never tasted so good to Lavonne Sanders, an entrepreneur who has turned popping golden kernels of corn into a lucrative business venture.’
      grain, cereal, cereal crop
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2British The chief cereal crop of a district, especially (in England) wheat or (in Scotland) oats.
      • ‘Peas, beans or carrots also formed part of the diet, plus corn, i.e. oats or maize.’
      • ‘To a European, corn covers all the cereal crops - wheat, barley, oat, and so on.’
      grain, cereal, cereal crop
      View synonyms
  • 2informal Something banal or sentimental.

    ‘the movie is pure corn’
    • ‘The appetite audiences have for sentimental corn should never be underestimated.’
    • ‘God, will I forever be forced to deal with this massive amount of cheese and corn from now on…?’
    • ‘Alexander's Ragtime Band is pure corn but rather tasty all the same.’

Phrases

  • corn on the cob

    • Corn when cooked and eaten straight from the cob; an ear of corn.

      • ‘Serve with steak fries, corn on the cob (you can do that on the grill, too), and the simplest salad you can think of.’
      • ‘If you like sweetcorn, try the corn on the cob - it was delicious, all barbecued and crispy.’
      • ‘Dad barbecued some steaks, and Mom made potato salad and corn on the cob.’
      • ‘Around her, hundreds of people were also enjoying barbecue beef sandwiches and corn on the cob.’
      • ‘My eyes nearly popped out of my head when I saw that dinner for the evening was to consist of rough hewn pork, corn on the cob, a messy cabbage-type salad and what I presumed were beef cutlets.’
      • ‘My Mom is making an All-American meal: burgers, corn on the cob, freshly made fries, and apple pie.’
      • ‘We had herbed chicken, beef brisket, chili beans, fruit salad and corn on the cob.’
      • ‘The ‘pearly whites’ of the corn on the cob, burst sweetly and milkily in your mouth straight off - roasting this variety, at least, was unnecessary.’
      • ‘This dish is pure luxury: a glorious pile of clams, mussels, corn on the cob, spicy sausage, and a bright-red lobster, all roasted on a bed of seaweed and served table-side.’
      • ‘While the food is unpretentious - steak, corn on the cob, beans, cowboy coffee - it's fresh and of top-drawer quality, and nobody goes away hungry.’

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch koren and German Korn.

Pronunciation:

corn

/kôrn/

Main definitions of corn in English

: corn1corn2

corn2

noun

  • A small, painful area of thickened skin on the foot, especially on the toes, caused by pressure.

    • ‘She wore cheap tennis shoes with holes cut out for corns or bunions, something painful.’
    • ‘On the toes, reactions to a pressure point are called corns.’
    • ‘The accessories that come with it: corns, hammertoes, bunions, ingrown toe nails, calluses, and the list goes on.’
    • ‘How many corns, bunions, ingrowing toenails, pads of rock-hard skin and blisters are hidden away under tights and woolly socks?’
    • ‘A variety of products are available over-the-counter for the treatment of common foot problems, such as athlete's foot, onychomycosis, foot pain, corns, warts and bunions.’
    • ‘Deepika is my foot guru who, in half an hour, will transform my unattractive foot complete with corns, calluses and untidy-looking toes into a thing of beauty.’
    • ‘Common problems are bunions, hammer toes, corns and pain in the balls of the feet.’
    • ‘Maybe they would have given me blisters or bunions or corns.’
    • ‘See your doctor if you have foot pain or corns, or if you can't trim your toenails well.’
    • ‘Wearing improperly fitting shoes on a daily basis causes foot problems such as calluses, corns, hammertoes, bunions, and more.’
    • ‘In addition, soaking your feet in warm water or with Epsom salts can alleviate painful corns and calluses.’
    • ‘But Mrs Ruthven warns the fad could lead to corns, bunions, calluses, claw toes, hammer toes - even arthritis and lower back problems.’
    • ‘From my 25th year, I have been suffering from corns on the feet.’
    • ‘See your regular doctor or a foot-care specialist for calluses, corns, bunions or warts.’
    • ‘Metatarsal pads can also be used to change the alignment of the toes to relieve pressure on soft corns.’
    • ‘By choosing appropriate footwear and keeping feet free of blisters, calluses and corns, we increase the body's general well being.’
    • ‘His feet did not sweat normally and he had huge corns over his weight-bearing areas of the big toe, the heel, and the heads of the deep bones of the toes.’
    • ‘That Bo Jackson, he can do anything, I once went to a brunch with him and my feet were covered with corns and after a handshake with him they were gone.’
    • ‘Most boot related injuries are the same injuries that wearing any tight, stiff shoe can cause, meaning corns, calluses, blisters, and bone spurs.’
    • ‘Bunions, blisters and corns sound gruesome - and they are.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Anglo-Norman French from Latin cornu horn.

Pronunciation:

corn

/kôrn/