Definition of cordillera in US English:

cordillera

noun

  • A system or group of parallel mountain ranges together with the intervening plateaus and other features, especially in the Andes or the Rockies.

    • ‘On various trips to the Blacks, Mitchell calculated several elevations that exceeded the height of New Hampshire's Mount Washington, then regarded as the highest of the Appalachian cordillera.’
    • ‘The mighty Andes Mountains divide into three long ranges - called cordilleras - that run the length of the country.’
    • ‘Two of them, the Rocky Mountains and Coastal Mountains, are both found in the west, while the arctic cordillera runs along the northeastern edge of the country.’
    • ‘To our left, Cuchillo displayed her perfectly formed profile while the rest of the cordillera's snow-covered peaks stretched into the distance.’
    • ‘At the time of the Spanish conquest, the Andean condor's silhouette was a common sight along the entire Andes cordillera.’
    • ‘It ranged along the cordillera from northern New Mexico to the Canadian border.’
    • ‘Numbers of natives, especially Tarahumara, moved into the deep recesses of the western cordillera of the Sierra Madre to escape the Spanish demands for labor.’
    • ‘I still wanted to look at the Cordillera Occidental, the western cordillera, the other main chain of the Andes.’
    • ‘In the western part, the Andean cordillera (system of mountain ranges) extends from north to south.’
    • ‘Orogenic activity in the Himalayan ranges reached its climax and the Andean cordilleras were given a major uplift, raising the land to about 4000m.’
    • ‘Great mountain ranges known as cordilleras divide Spain into distinct natural regions.’
    • ‘To the east the cordillera was scorched and spent, rubbled by decades of desperate agriculture.’
    • ‘‘Chacaltaya has split in two,’ scientist Edson Ramirez said as he led a visitor up toward a once-grand ice flow high in the thin air of the Bolivian cordillera.’
    mountain, hill, height, alp, aiguille, serac, puy, crag, tor, inselberg
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century: from Spanish, from cordilla, diminutive of cuerda ‘cord’, from Latin chorda (see cord).

Pronunciation

cordillera

/ˌkôrdlˈ(y)erə//ˌkɔrdlˈ(j)ɛrə/