Definition of coq au vin in English:

coq au vin

Pronunciation: /ˌkäk//ˌkōk ō ˈvaN/

noun

  • A casserole of chicken pieces cooked in red wine.

    • ‘That old rooster that died of old age was tomorrow's coq au vin.’
    • ‘Look up the recipe for coq au vin in Larousse and it advises using a Chambertin or a Mercurey.’
    • ‘You don't go to a place like Pistol to sample their cassoulet or coq au vin, but for solid bar fare and well-designed sandwiches, it's definitely one of the Main's better choices.’
    • ‘The other, a New Yorker who was seeing two therapists simultaneously, claimed that my attempts to impress him with an authentic coq au vin indicated that I was deeply insecure.’
    • ‘He is a happy rooster and I guarantee he will not end up as coq au vin.’
    • ‘Next, Nick entertained Eva while I tucked into my coq au vin: a tender chicken leg served on a bed of sauté potatoes with mushrooms and onions bobbing in the gravy.’
    • ‘There was a time, not that long ago, when the most exotic fare on offer in our capital city was coq au vin, a desultory vindaloo or a slab of lasagne.’
    • ‘Chef Jean Joho draws on his background in French casual food for a menu that includes coq au vin and cassoulet.’
    • ‘I questioned the substitution of Pepsi for red wine in a formulation of coq au vin.’
    • ‘The main course menu included coq au vin, fish pie, beef stroganoff and steaks cooked in different sauces, but also more unusual dishes, including fish and Thai flavours.’
    • ‘At block parties we dined on coq au vin, wild mushroom ragout, and home-baked sourdough bread.’
    • ‘But he should worry: if you can get a table at Balthazar, you're as likely as ever to see some celeb across the crowded room tucking into coq au vin or steak frîtes.’
    • ‘Daube, cassoulet, sauce béchamel, coq au vin, and all the other manifestations of French cuisine are the accoutrements of the good life.’
    • ‘Kenneth Slessor often told the story of the night Adam cooked coq au vin.’
    • ‘France's coq au vin, for instance, qualifies - it has the power to evoke years of tradition.’
    • ‘He ordered French onion soup, coq au vin and poire belle hélène.’
    • ‘Women saunter down the streets of the capital, Dakar, in dazzling fashions; nightclubs pump with a thriving loom music scene; restaurants in French-style buildings serve coq au vin and cappuccinos.’
    • ‘That's the secret of my coq au vin, which is essentially just a lazy casserole.’
    • ‘Among heartier entrées, however, the St. Louis ribs weren't worth the messy effort, and my Cornish-game-hen coq au vin had a lovely, juicy exterior, but was dried out inside.’
    • ‘It's a chicken stew that can stand on its own alongside other stewed chicken dishes, coq au vin and chicken cacciatore.’

Origin

Mid 20th century: French, literally cock in wine.

Pronunciation:

coq au vin

/ˌkäk//ˌkōk ō ˈvaN/