Definition of coppice in English:

coppice

noun

British
  • An area of woodland in which the trees or shrubs are, or formerly were, periodically cut back to ground level to stimulate growth and provide firewood or timber.

    • ‘I, too, felt as if I was peering into a coppice.’
    • ‘It is hoped that up to 148 acres of land will eventually be developed as fuel-efficient coppice over a six-year period.’
    • ‘The forest services are providing for a pilot project involving 47 hectares of short-rotation willow coppice.’
    • ‘It might be the edge of a coppice of trees which you can place in a fold in the distant hillside, or the spire of a church that you can put above a bush or tree at the waters edge.’
    • ‘The 50 members of the renewable energy growers' group say they need the money to determine whether their 16-year contracts to supply the Arbre plant at Eggborough with willow coppice are now worth anything.’
    • ‘The coppice of trees seemed to get thicker as tall birches lined the road, replacing the old-fashioned houses.’
    • ‘I recently observed several employees of Swindon Services hand-picking paper, plastic food containers, cans and bottles (some smashed) from hedges and coppices in the Shaw area.’
    • ‘We hike down a surprisingly gentle trail, passing through stunted pinons to a Ponderosa coppice and a fetchingly derelict bridge at river's edge.’
    • ‘Instead of the majestic oak woods the path now runs through an oak coppice, where the trees have been regularly cut to produce young, straight trees which, in former days, would have been regularly coppiced.’
    • ‘The coppice coppiced today is to be used to make a fence around the other caravan in the farmyard and I was looking for thicker branches no thinner than my skinny arms but definitely not as thick as Fred's.’
    • ‘The plan is to start producing synthetic gas from the willow coppice chips by Christmas and produce electricity at full capacity by Easter.’
    • ‘It had been built beside woodland on the edge of the Hallowsmere Estate and was cloaked to the north and west by a canopy of oaks and beeches, sheltering a coppice of aspen, hawthorn and wild plum.’
    • ‘Utilization of starch reserves in naturally regenerating coppices was estimated to provide only a small proportion of the dry matter accumulated in new shoots.’
    • ‘A stream ran through it, and around it were fields, orchards and small woods, or coppices.’
    • ‘While harnessing wind energy and burning willow coppice may seem good ideas, in reality it is not much more than green window dressing.’
    • ‘Hearing footsteps approach the coppice, however, he was saved from answering his own question.’
    • ‘In an attempt to use land not needed for food production, local farmers have been encouraged to plant willow coppices to be cut for chippings for a power station near Selby.’
    • ‘A stiff, insistent breeze was blowing as I came along, of excellent, healthy sea air, and there being no coppices, nor buildings nor obstacles of any kind on the very highest points, I made swift and unimpeded progress.’
    • ‘What we're going to actually do with our coppice is unclear at the moment.’
    • ‘Regrowth is fast and the coppice is allowed to grow until the poles are big enough to be used for crafts.’
    shrubbery, vegetation, greenery, ground cover, underwood, copsewood, brushwood, brush, scrub, underscrub, cover, covert, thicket, copse, coppice, wood, jungle
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
  • Cut back (a tree or shrub) to ground level periodically to stimulate growth.

    ‘coppiced timber’
    • ‘I thought it was going to fell the odd tree and do some coppicing but this was drastic.’
    • ‘Previously, through coppicing and replanting, estates were able to sustain their timber supplies into the indefinite future.’
    • ‘Woodland was no longer coppiced on the same scale to produce charcoal for fuel or timber for construction, so that land could be released for food.’
    • ‘We cleared through this banking last winter, taking out or coppicing overgrown shrubs and controlling the undergrowth of brambles and ferns.’
    • ‘The leaflets also provide specific guidelines for laying or coppicing hedgerows which have grown up, lost their dense base and are in need of rejuvenation.’
    • ‘Volunteers will be encouraged to help coppice a large hedge, which will enable the group to create a new play area at the centre.’
    • ‘On inspection they were found to be in poor condition and needed to be coppiced under the council's duty of care.’
    • ‘For hundreds of years, woodsmen in Britain practiced coppicing, a method of harvesting timber.’
    • ‘Consider rejuvenating a small length by laying or coppicing at ground level.’
    • ‘If laying or coppicing a hedgerow it must be in good condition and not diseased.’
    • ‘This tree is extremely tolerant of atmospheric pollution, and when coppiced in spring, will reach a height of eight feet, producing hairy, soft leaves up to two feet across, in just one season.’
    • ‘Instead of the majestic oak woods the path now runs through an oak coppice, where the trees have been regularly cut to produce young, straight trees which, in former days, would have been regularly coppiced.’
    • ‘Power & Water acknowledges that coppicing the trees would create greater effluent uptake as trees re-grow, but there has been no action on this front apparently for legal liability reasons.’
    • ‘A programme of rotation, similar to that used by farmers, is used to divide the wood into sections which are coppiced in turn, offering different habitats for different creatures while one area is left to its own devices.’
    • ‘The coppice coppiced today is to be used to make a fence around the other caravan in the farmyard and I was looking for thicker branches no thinner than my skinny arms but definitely not as thick as Fred's.’
    • ‘Clearing woodland by coppicing involves cutting it to the ground, allowing woodland flora and fauna to flourish, while encouraging new shoots to appear from the plant stumps.’
    • ‘Kennet District Council has since released a statement saying it took action to coppice four self seeded sycamore trees, or remove branches, after receiving complaints from residents.’
    • ‘Some farmers misunderstand what they are supposed to do such as, trimming a hedge when the plan said to coppice it.’
    • ‘The forest has been intensively coppiced, and multi-stemmed trees make up a large fraction of the present tree population.’
    • ‘They cleared some of the natural broadleaf woodland to make way for sheep pastures; they also coppiced or managed other parts of the woodland for timber and firewood.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French copeiz, based on medieval Latin colpus a blow (see cope). Compare with copse.

Pronunciation:

coppice

/ˈkäpəs/