Main definitions of coper in English

: coper1coper2

coper1

(also horse-coper)

noun

archaic
  • A horse-dealer.

    • ‘They were a queer folk, silent and self-contained, and keeping very much to themselves - odd-tempered at times - decent on the whole, for they never produced a drunkard - wonderful horse-breakers and horse-copers and dog - trainers and poachers - relics of an earlier England.’
    • ‘According to legend in one of the granges there was a unique well with fine drinking water where the Armenian horse-copers would often stop for watering and to refresh themselves.’
    • ‘On the commons and in the fields outside the town, wandering folk of all descriptions - gypsies, ‘hawkers, tinkers, fortune-tellers, horse-copers, and ragamuffins - took up their abode.’
    • ‘She indicated that a trade rival, who was a horse-coper and widely known by his nickname of " Was,’ had done the deed, and he was ultimately convicted and punished.’
    • ‘The working lives of late 19 th- and early 20 th-century shoemakers, horse-copers, lace-makers and milliners are resurrected for us.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Middle English cope ‘buy’, from Dutch, Low German kōpen; related to German kaufen, also to cheap.

Pronunciation

coper

/ˈkōpər//ˈkoʊpər/

Main definitions of coper in English

: coper1coper2

coper2

noun

  • A person who deals effectively with difficult situations.

    ‘Emma was always going to be fine. She was one of life's copers’
    • ‘I seem to be a very good coper.’
    • ‘They're the copers, they support each other and they make things work.’
    • ‘Michelle's a coper.’
    • ‘Those oldest old are optimistic, committed to something interesting, are actively mobile, and good copers with life.’
    • ‘After he lost his sight, "he was very much a coper," Dr Shapiro said.’
    • ‘Tebby and he had met in a mental hospital previously and had stayed together ever since, despite being a poor coper which is understandable.’
    • ‘"Usually he's incredibly positive, a coper."’
    • ‘Once upon a time, nannies were the carers and the copers for middle-class families whose parents had opted out.’
    • ‘She said many of the inmates were 'poor copers' who were either behind bars for the first time, of limited intelligence or physically weak.’
    • ‘I was, but I am a coper.’

Pronunciation

coper

/ˈkōpər//ˈkoʊpər/