Main definitions of cope in English

: cope1cope2

cope1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1(of a person) deal effectively with something difficult.

    ‘his ability to cope with stress’
    ‘it all got too much for me and I couldn't cope’
    • ‘Urban and rural dwellers have adopted creative survival strategies, that have helped them cope with difficult times.’
    • ‘"I don't cope well with the unrelenting demands of professional rugby, " he said then.’
    • ‘Others suggested that labels helped people cope better, gave them legitimacy, and signalled protected funding and physician time.’
    • ‘By 2000 he could no longer cope living alone and stopped work.’
    • ‘Over the years I learned where the controls were and coped pretty well.’
    • ‘What are the personal characteristics we need to cope effectively with rapid change?’
    • ‘Would she be able to cope living with Thomas, whom she didn't like?’
    • ‘At present Rand Water is easily coping with water demands, with the correct technology and expertise in place.’
    • ‘Some young people do not cope very well with school and may end up being excluded.’
    • ‘Understanding the need for change is essential for the ability to successfully cope with these challenges.’
    • ‘All I can say about it is nice people are easy to deal with and unpleasant people are much more difficult to cope with.’
    • ‘Hospitals across the country have been inundated with patients unable to cope at home.’
    • ‘In a police interview the 39-year-old unemployed man, who is not being identified for legal reasons, admitted he found it difficult to cope with the children.’
    • ‘Learning to cope effectively with stress may help prevent illness or reduce the chance that the child will behave inappropriately.’
    • ‘The early exchanges were even enough with both sides having difficulty coping with the desperate conditions.’
    • ‘How do you cope living with such a high-profile woman?’
    • ‘But trouble coping with pressure is part of what drives Baker to drink.’
    • ‘I used the page to deal with my inability to cope at that moment.’
    • ‘Frank Smith related how his son was a sensitive person who did not cope well with crises.’
    • ‘I was blessed with ward staff who had coped successfully with other difficult situations.’
    manage, survive, subsist, look after oneself, fend for oneself, shift for oneself, stand on one's own two feet, carry on, get through, get on, get along, get by, muddle through, muddle along, scrape by, bear up, make the grade, come through, hold one's own, keep one's end up, keep one's head above water, keep the wolf from the door, weather the storm
    deal with, handle, manage, address, face, face up to, confront, tackle, sort out, take care of, take in hand, get to grips with, contend with, grapple with, wrestle with, struggle with, tussle with
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a machine or system) have the capacity to deal successfully with.
      ‘the roads are barely adequate to cope with the present traffic’
      • ‘Research indicates that something as simple as drinking a liter of sports drink per hour appears to help the immune system cope with intense exercise.’
      • ‘Residents said local infrastructure could not cope with so many new houses and questioned if town centre facilities were adequate for the increase in population.’
      • ‘The station had to replace its fax machine three times to cope with the flood of paper.’
      • ‘But after last year's problems there are concerns about whether the system can cope with processing millions of changes.’
      • ‘Health chiefs attended a recent emergency meeting to discuss how local health services will cope with an influx of injured servicemen and women from the Gulf.’
      • ‘But how did online news services cope with the massive surge in demand?’
      • ‘It was no wonder traffic in the east was reduced to a snail's pace when so many people were working in the area leading to congestion which the roads and infrastructure could not cope with.’
      • ‘It soon became apparent that Reynolds rear tyre could not cope with the drying track and he was starting to lose time.’
      • ‘Many Asian governments have given up on financial restructuring, saying their economies can't cope with it now.’
      • ‘Every postcard has to be scanned and there is a high rate of rejection mainly because the machines cannot cope with the calligraphic variations flowing from the farmer's pen!’
      • ‘There is a debrief meeting today and clearly the point we will be making to the council is our services cannot cope with that number.’
      • ‘At this time of year, we are at our most busiest and occasionally, we get more film in than the printer processing machine can cope with.’
      • ‘The manufacturing sector of British economy could not cope with a further appreciation in the strength of sterling.’
      • ‘This is not to say the court system couldn't cope with some reform to deal with new situations.’
      • ‘Our aim was to combine all the most demanding operating conditions for the engine, and to guarantee the engine can cope with them.’
      • ‘My main concern is how St. George's infrastructure will cope with the arrival of 2,500 passengers at once.’
      • ‘And could the Australian economy cope with a mass exodus from credit?’
      • ‘He added that a Caribbean development fund was also essential to help smaller economies cope with increased competition.’
      • ‘The airport has recruited an extra 500 staff to cope with huge influx of supporters.’
      • ‘No doubt it needed beefing up so that the transmission could cope with the extra power, but I missed its former silky action.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘meet in battle, come to blows’): from Old French coper, colper, from cop, colp ‘a blow’, via Latin from Greek kolaphos ‘blow with the fist’.

Pronunciation

cope

/kōp//koʊp/

Main definitions of cope in English

: cope1cope2

cope2

noun

  • 1A long, loose cloak worn by a priest or bishop on ceremonial occasions.

    • ‘Made between 1300 and 1320, the cope would have been worn by a high-ranking priest or bishop.’
    • ‘Saints embroidered in metallic and silk threads decorate the orphrey, the ornamental band along the top of the cope as pictured here.’
    • ‘Here she was vested in her robes of state and was met by the bishop who was to perform the ceremony, with all the chapel Royal in their copes, the bishop mitred.’
    1. 1.1literary, technical A thing resembling or likened to a cloak.
      ‘the bay and the square were a seamless cope’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as adjective coped
  • (in building) cover (a joint or structure) with a coping.

Origin

Middle English (denoting a long outdoor cloak): from medieval Latin capa, variant of late Latin cappa (see cap and cape).

Pronunciation

cope

/koʊp//kōp/