Definition of cop a feel in English:

cop a feel

phrase

informal
  • Fondle someone sexually, especially in a surreptitious way or without their permission.

    • ‘‘What a get up,’ he added, copping a feel of Lynn's well outlined derrière.’
    • ‘Despite their stuck-in-high-school doofiness, they were loyal friends who tried to do right by the girls, even as they were trying to cop a feel.’
    • ‘But not even an Italian will cop a feel and then try to get away with a lame: ‘I was just being friendly.’’
    • ‘He thinks it's a good thing that I keep staring at him, but really I'm just afraid he's going to try to cop a feel while I'm not looking.’
    • ‘But I know it was probably him trying to cop a feel.’
    • ‘People in Cornwall will be parading about in horse costumes trying to cop a feel of the local farmer's daughter.’
    • ‘And don't you dare cop a feel in the back seat of my car.’
    • ‘The liquor is talking to them and they try to cop a feel.’
    • ‘You wouldn't believe how many guys try to cop a feel, or jump on stage and try to molest me.’
    • ‘Then she tried dating, concluding from one adolescent's attempt to cop a feel that all men go about this, no matter what their age.’
    • ‘Don't tell me you tried to cop a feel or something.’
    • ‘As I sauntered down the beach on the prowl for a passed out girl that I could cop a feel from, I spied a raggedy looking tent that was selling strange looking wares.’
    • ‘Morris copped a feel again this afternoon, shoved his hand right down my uniform.’
    • ‘If he tries anything funny, like lifting up her skirt to cop a feel, he gets his hand slapped.’
    • ‘He's hit on me all night, tried cop a feel, and refused to back off.’
    • ‘I feel like I just shelled out a couple hundred bucks for dinner for two at a nice restaurant, but didn't even get to cop a feel.’