Definition of convict in English:

convict

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
Pronunciation /kənˈvɪkt//kənˈvikt/
  • Declare (someone) to be guilty of a criminal offense by the verdict of a jury or the decision of a judge in a court of law.

    ‘the theives were convicted of the robbery’
    ‘a convicted murderer’
    • ‘To name culprits who had not defended themselves and were not obliged to do so would have been the moral equivalent to convicting someone without due process.’
    • ‘He was not convicted of any offence, but the police refused to return the money.’
    • ‘The count on which he was convicted was the first count of a three count indictment.’
    • ‘The rest of us are aware how low the chances are of actually arresting and convicting anyone for an offence in the first place.’
    • ‘Prosecutors fear that if they can only show he was acting suspiciously, the jury may be swayed by the defence into convicting him of a lesser offence, preventing a death sentence.’
    • ‘The jury convicted you on the basis of observations, phone calls and books on that basis.’
    • ‘Her most recent trial ended last week with the jury split 8 to 4 in favor of convicting her of second-degree murder after six days of deliberations.’
    • ‘The same result was reached when a judge in the Court convicting the applicants had presided over another trial in which the other participants in the same criminal incident had been convicted.’
    • ‘He was convicted of a series of offences arising from the photography at an earlier hearing.’
    • ‘The prosecution's use of such evidence to stampede a jury into convicting him of multiple felonies flies in the face of the First Amendment.’
    • ‘He knew that the cheque would bounce, and at first instance he was convicted of theft.’
    • ‘At his trial, a jury spent 24 days considering a verdict before convicting him of conning thousands of Britons, many of them elderly, out of their savings.’
    • ‘I think a jury would have a much more difficult time in convicting him.’
    • ‘First, he criticised judges for not convicting criminals often enough when prosecutors bring cases before them.’
    • ‘Although he denied the charge, he was convicted of robbery and jailed for six years.’
    • ‘The reality is that he was convicted of an offence to which he could have pleaded guilty.’
    • ‘Williams was also convicted of the theft of two cars and an unrelated burglary.’
    • ‘The Court of Criminal Appeal held that the jury acted unreasonably in convicting him of that count.’
    • ‘If so, Morrison wants to know whether the judge who convicted him was aware of this fact.’
    • ‘But the jury rejected his account, convicting him of murder by a majority verdict.’
    declare guilty, find guilty, pronounce guilty
    View synonyms

noun

Pronunciation /ˈkɑnˌvɪkt//ˈkänˌvikt/
  • A person found guilty of a criminal offense and serving a sentence of imprisonment.

    • ‘And some states are better at rehabilitating the prisoners and convicts behind the bars.’
    • ‘He stayed there for a moment and took it all in, feeling like a convict making an escape in one of those prison movies.’
    • ‘They are lumped in with more high security risk prisoners - principally narcotics convicts.’
    • ‘For a long time in Australia, probably the main industry was the transportation of convicts from the United Kingdom.’
    • ‘Two convicts escape while handcuffed together, and are pursued by police and the press while attempting to track down their former associates.’
    • ‘In this open prison convicts live with their families, go out to work and pay taxes for water and electricity’
    • ‘He also started writing his own fiction, which focused primarily on convicts and prison life.’
    • ‘With the help of a few survivors and the military junk pile at their disposal, they have to take on a prison full of convicts who now run the place.’
    • ‘Many times convicts have escaped while under a warder, not because the officer is negligent but simply that he is looking after too many inmates than he ought to.’
    • ‘As the film is about a football game between convicts and warders, it also draws on the clichés of the sports movie.’
    • ‘As of 2001, drug convicts accounted for 57 percent of the federal inmate population.’
    • ‘But there was no real private population here to provide support; he was as much a prisoner here as the convicts.’
    • ‘Suspended death sentences in China often are commuted to life in prison if the convicts are deemed reformed.’
    • ‘As of October 2002, there were 83 convicts on death row for crimes committed as minors.’
    • ‘One day when Chris was at work and the kids were at school, two convicts who had escaped from jail broke into the Rodgers home in an attempt to hide from the police.’
    • ‘Languishing in jail for the last year and a half, she is said to be sharing space in the jail with drug convicts and other criminals.’
    • ‘This middle-class morality also defined female convicts ' experiences of prison life.’
    • ‘Edith looked at me as if I was one of the runaway convicts of some county jail.’
    • ‘The transportation of convicts had only ended in 1868.’
    • ‘Do you have any idea how much it costs to keep a convict in prison?’
    prisoner, inmate
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Origin

Middle English: from Latin convict- ‘demonstrated, refuted, convicted’, from the verb convincere (see convince). The noun is from obsolete convict ‘convicted’.

Pronunciation

convict

Verb/kənˈvɪkt/

convict

Noun/ˈkɑnˌvɪkt/