Main definitions of converse in English

: converse1converse2

converse1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Engage in conversation.

    ‘he fell in beside her and they began to converse amicably’
    • ‘The lounge had a welcoming, roaring fire and the notes of the piano rose above the sound of guests conversing over Martinis.’
    • ‘After conversing quite frequently for a few more days, Mark sent a missive requesting we meet up for a few beers with his man.’
    • ‘So there we were, none of us native French speakers, conversing in the one non-native language which we all shared.’
    • ‘It would be fair to say that, while we conversed amicably for what was a very long session, our views on international politics were not in accord.’
    • ‘We had no trouble conversing with one another and before I knew it we were at the restaurant.’
    • ‘The rain thundered down for the rest of our meal, and we had to stay in the garage conversing in shouts and sitting in near darkness.’
    • ‘I ate lunch with them daily as we conversed about various issues occurring in the United States.’
    • ‘There is a lack of basic etiquette while conversing over mobile phones.’
    • ‘The least we all can do is to keep observing, thinking and conversing.’
    • ‘Tom said that he came across the idea while conversing with Fred at his door.’
    • ‘You know, just by conversing, you can really learn a lot about a person.’
    • ‘They were, as usual, conversing loudly, but I somehow managed to drown them out in my sleep.’
    • ‘As we stood there conversing in this manner, a crowd gathered around to listen.’
    • ‘Speaking in one voice emphasises the importance of listening when conversing.’
    • ‘It was a social evening with a high turnout of regulars mixing, mingling and conversing.’
    • ‘Ten minutes later while I was conversing with my client, I felt a tap on my shoulder.’
    • ‘As the lads chatted and conversed in overwhelmed joy, Maria sat in a plastic chair, near the corner of the room.’
    • ‘For the two weeks we were there, it seemed like we were constantly conversing.’
    • ‘Soon millions of people were conversing across the oceans, often without knowing it.’
    • ‘He'd seated himself at our table conversing with some of the revelers when I joined the group.’
    talk, speak, chat, have a conversation, have a talk, have a discussion, discourse
    confer, parley, consult with each other
    chatter, gossip
    chew the fat, chew the rag, gab, jaw, powwow, have a confab
    natter, rabbit, witter, chunter
    rap, shoot the breeze, shoot the bull
    conversate
    mag
    confabulate
    View synonyms

noun

Archaic
  • Conversation.

    • ‘He was neither a wit nor a brilliant raconteur, neither well-read nor well-educated, and he made no great contribution to enlightened social converse.’
    • ‘With that he disappeared back into the kitchen and he heard the low tones of converse resume.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense live among, be familiar with): from Old French converser, from Latin conversari keep company (with) from con- with + versare, frequentative of vertere to turn The current sense of the verb dates from the early 17th century.

Main definitions of converse in English

: converse1converse2

converse2

noun

  • 1A situation, object, or statement that is the reverse of another, or that corresponds to it but with certain terms transposed.

    ‘if spirituality is properly political, the converse is also true: politics is properly spiritual’
    • ‘It is healthy for democracy, though the converse is also true; over-concentration of ownership in too few hands is bad for democracy.’
    • ‘The converse is true: When a robot is particularly unhumanoid, we seem to find it all the more ‘alive’.’
    • ‘The converse may well be true - wrongdoing on the part of the recipient may strengthen a claim for relief - but it does not follow that the absence of wrongdoing means that an injunction should not be granted.’
    • ‘The converse is also true: An unstable East Timor would be detrimental to Indonesia.’
    • ‘But the converse can be true, as well: Sport sometimes puts supposedly life-and-death matters in perspective.’
    • ‘They say politics makes strange bedfellows, but the converse may also be true.’
    • ‘It is easy to understand the strong feelings of smokers who feel victimized by the anti-smoking sentiments of the majority, sadly the converse is not true.’
    • ‘The present paper is concerned with the converse: situations in which actions influence the perception of stimuli.’
    • ‘The converse held true for two additional teaching methods, designing/revising a course and preparing effective lesson plans.’
    • ‘Importantly, however, the converse does not hold true.’
    • ‘But, then, the converse is also true: the Irish were good to America.’
    • ‘For example, it is possible for a female spectator to be addressed, as it were, ‘in the masculine’, and the converse is presumably also true.’
    • ‘Then, I realized, the converse must also be true: Whatever I don't have, I don't need.’
    • ‘But the converse is also true: a single physiological experience may be symptomatic of a number of different emotions.’
    • ‘Clearly, there are people who are happier looking at the history of astrology and the philosophy behind it than actually sitting down with clients and doing charts - and people for whom the converse is true.’
    • ‘The converse is also true: when we do not understand how our mind works, the practice becomes difficult, if not impossible.’
    • ‘Unfortunately for translators, and for readers of Goethe unfamiliar with German, the converse is also true: the poetry of the German language is of the essence of Goethe.’
    • ‘The converse is equally true: the Divine draws on the frameworks familiar to each individual in calling him or her toward itself.’
    • ‘It's actually a bit more complex than that because moral facts are partly dependent on physical facts, but the converse is not true.’
    • ‘Our interest in this problem began with the search for a converse to this statement.’
    opposite, reverse, obverse, inverse, contrary, antithesis
    other side of the coin
    per contra
    flip side
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Mathematics
      A theorem whose hypothesis and conclusion are the conclusion and hypothesis of another.
      • ‘It was first proved by Lagrange in 1773 who showed that the converse is true.’
      • ‘The next year, Littlewood proved a profound converse of a famous theorem of Norwegian mathematician Abel on the summation of series.’
      • ‘A complete characterization of this quotient ring and a short proof of the converse can be found in.’
      • ‘Desargues's Theorem and its converse are of the first importance to mathematicians by reason of their complete generality.’
      • ‘The converse is also true, i.e. that every rational number has a decimal fraction that either stops or eventually repeats the same cycle of digits over and over again for ever.’

adjective

  • Having characteristics that are the reverse of something else already mentioned.

    ‘the slow process of growth and the converse process of decay’
    • ‘The obvious converse question is what do you achieve by legalising it?’
    • ‘In his intense scrutiny of the politics adhering to various forms, Benjamin shows a converse sensitivity to initial conditions.’
    • ‘Nor do I think using the converse argument is a valid point.’
    • ‘The converse case, in which we encounter humanlike brains and retinas but find no verbal behavior, is the situation we encounter in the question of animal consciousness.’
    • ‘A converse prize for the most catastrophic failure to use force, leading to the greatest net detriment to the human condition, would also be interesting.’
    • ‘On the converse side, I know a girl who is so cripplingly insecure with such a fixed negative self image that she soon brings most other people around her to seeing her as she sees herself.’
    • ‘Most restaurants and farms have converse hours.’
    • ‘Obviously, the converse position also applies in that during a downturn in investment markets the impact is felt directly in terms of a reduction in the value of the retirement account.’
    • ‘His manager, too, appreciates the benefits of cups spilling over into the league and used a converse example to make his point.’
    • ‘The converse proposition is that if priority is given in that tension to ensuring that people are not out-of-pocket, all sorts of meritorious cases might not get to court.’
    • ‘Evidence exists that weight gain increases cancer risk, but the converse proposition that weight loss would reduce risk of the disease has not been confirmed.’
    • ‘The two devices then perform the converse operation.’
    • ‘As a result, any resolution of this debate will be open to the charge that it goes too far - as well as the converse charge that it does not go far enough.’
    • ‘There is a converse relationship in the emphasis of the articles between the French Quebec and the English-language papers.’
    • ‘Apart from the applied fisheries literature, the converse link between adults and the production of cohorts of recruits has received much less attention.’
    • ‘A similar point can be made in converse fashion.’
    • ‘The converse question is, what do we sacrifice by adopting the death penalty?’
    • ‘He also notes the converse responsibility of policy makers to provide clear and unambiguous requirements to the intelligence community.’
    • ‘Books reify the converse trend - from private to public goods.’
    • ‘Some theorists have suggested that drug policy should drive the law rather than the converse strategy in place.’
    opposite, opposing, contrary, counter, antithetical
    clashing, incompatible, in disagreement, disagreeing, conflicting, differing
    reverse, obverse, inverse
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin conversus turned around past participle of convertere (see convert).