Definition of contort in US English:

contort

verb

  • Twist or bend out of the normal shape.

    with object ‘a spasm of pain contorted his face’
    no object ‘her face contorted with anger’
    figurative ‘a contorted version of the truth’
    • ‘Her face contorts in pain as she moves but she remains in her restless sleep.’
    • ‘There was such a look of abject pain contorting her delicate features that he suddenly felt like an absolute scoundrel.’
    • ‘He looked at me for a moment, his face contorted with pain, and reached out to touch my cheek.’
    • ‘He then proceeded to twist and contort his features into a splendidly ugly mask of itself.’
    • ‘They never did make any sense and were often contorted versions of a day at the orphanage.’
    • ‘His face was contorted with pain and the source did not seem to be his injury alone.’
    • ‘Her face contorted with the pain but she wrenched harder, thinking of her freedom.’
    • ‘She is tremendously emotive, contorting her facial features into the ugliest conceivable shapes.’
    • ‘Rick snapped, his features contorting in anger.’
    • ‘His face contorts in pain, and his right arm clutches his heart.’
    • ‘His little face would contort in pain every time he coughed or sneezed, and he was suffering quite badly.’
    • ‘Reed Richards acquires the power to contort into any shape he pleases.’
    • ‘Her face was contorted, twisted almost beyond recognition in agony.’
    • ‘Her face contorted with pain and shock as if she'd just walked into a lamp post.’
    • ‘It twists their faces and contorts their features.’
    • ‘Zack's face contorts in barely controlled anger.’
    • ‘Athletes contort and bend in unnatural positions.’
    • ‘He twists and contorts the impossible and the plausible, having his characters do impossible things that make absolute sense.’
    • ‘I reached Rob, and he was still face down, contorting his limbs but making no move to get up.’
    • ‘Because the body is often contorted into new shapes, training is a particularly associated with picking up injuries.’
    twist, screw up, distort
    twist, bend out of shape, wrench out of shape, misshape, warp, buckle, deform
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin contort- ‘twisted round, brandished’, from the verb contorquere, from con- ‘together’ + torquere ‘twist’.

Pronunciation

contort

/kənˈtôrt//kənˈtɔrt/