Definition of continuity in English:

continuity

noun

  • 1The unbroken and consistent existence or operation of something over a period of time.

    ‘pension rights accruing through continuity of employment’
    • ‘The study is designed to provide accurate, consistent data and ensure continuity of collection methods.’
    • ‘A copy of critical company data at a secondary site is also a prerequisite for continuity in business operations.’
    • ‘The analysis viewed the situation as critical and said there was an even greater need for continuity in foreign policy, and increased responsibility on the side of the new rulers.’
    • ‘In addition, many organizations have come to realize the importance of data as an asset for business operations and continuity.’
    • ‘The result is an efficient and flexible solution for the business continuity of global operations.’
    • ‘For several of the remaining joint ventures I was able to establish continuity of operations until some date between the date of founding and 1991.’
    • ‘Overall, there is a reasonably strong and consistent association between continuity and patient and doctor satisfaction.’
    • ‘Once again at the level of the overkingship, as opposed to the smaller kingdoms, there was no continuity of existence and association with a particular family.’
    • ‘Several mechanisms are implemented by most businesses to ensure business continuity.’
    • ‘But in each case, it is continuity of policy that is the essential ingredient.’
    • ‘Further, it is not necessary to establish an unbroken chain of continuity.’
    • ‘Team midwifery was meant to ensure better continuity of care for mothers.’
    • ‘In the inertia and unbroken continuity of their daily lives, they come to believe that a tomorrow is guaranteed for them.’
    • ‘Our goal was to ensure continuity of operations while we developed new and more aggressive policies.’
    • ‘With these, corporations can resolve security issues, protect critical assets, and ensure business continuity.’
    • ‘Cases abound in natural history studies of ants, chimps, baboons, etc., who, in extremis, give their existence for continuity of their kin.’
    • ‘We maintain continuity of care assessing them at regular intervals throughout their illness, till the very end.’
    • ‘The claimants' continuity of employment was unbroken.’
    • ‘Emphasizing the unchanging aspects of the topography, he made the case for the unbroken continuity of scriptural history with the living present.’
    • ‘Studied carefully, they also demonstrate a remarkable continuity in terms of his practice.’
    continuousness, uninterruptedness, flow, progression
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    1. 1.1 A state of stability and the absence of disruption.
      ‘they have provided the country with a measure of continuity’
      • ‘He said it was the intention to build for the future by embracing change while maintaining continuity, and, in an age of marketing and packaging, aesthetics should not be elevated above ethics.’
      • ‘Civil servants love continuity and hate change.’
      • ‘Rather, we are changing the conception of continuity in almost every respect.’
      • ‘I think it's the stability and continuity of our church life that is attracting many Americans to come to us.’
      • ‘This allows for continuity, stability, and reliability, without the uncertainty of state or city budget constraints.’
      • ‘They nurse the icon of an eternal ethnic Georgia whose cultural and political continuity stretches back unbroken to the Bronze Age and probably beyond.’
      • ‘The queen, however, is as constant as the polar star, and it is that continuity, stability and dignity which Britons are now celebrating.’
      • ‘James said the present executive consists of four persons who had served previously, and this allows for a measure of continuity.’
      • ‘Bulgarian foreign policy was one of continuity and predictability, for which it was appreciated both at home and abroad, said Stoyanov.’
      • ‘Children need continuity, consistency and predictability from their caregiver.’
      • ‘This gave her strength and a feeling of permanence, continuity and contentment with her home.’
      • ‘Or is it a point at which continuity should be more important than change?’
      • ‘This strain of conservatism prefers stability to change, continuity to experiment, and the tried to the untried.’
      • ‘They are a sign of civilisation, of stability and continuity, of order.’
      • ‘All of this is characterized by redundant aspects of stability, permanence and continuity.’
      • ‘Instead, he emphasizes the continuity in British industrial relations and gradual historical change.’
      • ‘The emergent event is an unexpected disruption of continuity, an inhibition of passage.’
      • ‘Mr Brennan said it would look at the need for continuity and stability in family life, parenting supports, caring for relatives and encouraging a bigger role for fathers in parenting.’
      • ‘For the old guard, defence of the Soviet Union may have represented comforting continuity - unbroken contact with the party's revolutionary roots.’
      • ‘Getting value for money in the first place, not to mention some continuity and stability, would have been more impressive still.’
      stability, durability, persistence, permanency, fixity, fixedness, changelessness, immutability, endurance, dependability, constancy, continuance, immortality, indestructibility, perpetuity, endlessness
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    2. 1.2often continuity between/with A connection or line of development with no sharp breaks.
      ‘they used the same style of masonry to provide continuity between new and old’
      • ‘Other books, more often than not written by religious believers, emphasize continuities between the pursuit of theological and scientific truth.’
      • ‘It is the same as it ever was, absolutely unbroken continuity.’
      • ‘Where the continuities between what the folklorists described and earlier elements are substantial enough we can feel justified in using more recent materials to flesh out earlier sources.’
      • ‘To emphasize this continuity, the design needed to create a sense of movement.’
      • ‘Reading Johns's study, I was repeatedly struck by continuities between the early modern world he describes and the present day.’
      • ‘This trick of perspective has been undone by the demise of the Cold War and, as a result, the continuities between the 1990s and the pre-Second World War period stand out more sharply.’
      • ‘Traditionally inspired music is predominant in the arts and represents cultural continuity with the past.’
      • ‘Johnson emphasizes the continuities, both chronological and geographical, between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.’
      • ‘Of course, there may be continuities between the culture that is the church and the culture in which we find ourselves.’
      • ‘Arnstein demonstrates how adroitly Victoria handled several recurring issues that provided the continuities between the two distinct periods of her life.’
      • ‘I see significant continuities between these movements.’
      • ‘In this respect especially, seventeenth-century philosophy has important continuities with the Aristotelian tradition and with Hellenistic philosophy.’
      • ‘Scott stresses the continuities between the two works.’
      • ‘The important point is, it descends from the past and represents a continuity with the past.’
      • ‘For Burke, historical continuity was central to his understanding of society.’
      • ‘This is a problem for the law, which does not like surprises and certainly proceeds by analogising new situations to old ones in order to build continuity.’
      • ‘Interestingly, both have traditions of almost unbroken continuity.’
      • ‘Pool devotes equal attention in these final chapters to continuities between the liberation struggle and the state as well as ruptures and contradictions.’
      • ‘Trying to perpetuate cultural continuity's an important thing, and that's part of what education is for.’
      • ‘No such spatial and generational continuity existed for the immigrant European Americans.’
      interrelationship, interrelatedness, intertextuality, interconnectedness, connection, linkage, cohesion, coherence
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  • 2The maintenance of continuous action and self-consistent detail in the various scenes of a movie or broadcast.

    [as modifier] ‘a continuity error’
    • ‘There are some gross continuity errors in the version of the film currently available.’
    • ‘There are multiple continuity and timing errors.’
    • ‘Levin and Simons argue the opposite: that we don't notice continuity errors in film because we wouldn't notice them in real life, either.’
    • ‘If you look for continuity errors, you will find a few, and they might make you laugh.’
    • ‘The continuity in this film is a bit off, in terms of coffee cups with too much or too little coffee to match the previous shot.’
    • ‘It's a fascinating track that goes into extensive detail about the film's lack of continuity.’
    • ‘The main problem with making films is keeping continuity.’
    • ‘There are also massive continuity errors and shoddy production values that aid a lazy script by writers with no interest in doing research.’
    • ‘This is the reason for one of the obvious continuity errors in the film.’
    • ‘Instead of having ‘innumerable opportunities’ for new stories, we were given innumerable continuity errors.’
    • ‘When you're watching a seemingly coherent film, you do expect attention to detail and continuity, you also expect the use of logic and reason.’
    • ‘The look of the film itself is very uneven, with poor continuity and obvious shifts from sharp detail to stock footage of various amounts of grain.’
    • ‘The viewer is left to create a large amount of continuity out of the dialogue and scenes that wander aimlessly.’
    • ‘There is also some nice continuity in the camera work.’
    • ‘These, of course, are the kind of continuity errors that are always present in action films, but they are pretty hard to ignore in this case.’
    • ‘They are quite forthright in letting us know about scenes that are meant to be homages to other western film-makers, or in pointing out instances where continuity errors occurred.’
    • ‘The film's continuity is established by an emphasis on gesture and/or dance throughout.’
    • ‘I am, however, interested in knowing about any continuity errors, since it's possible that a few escaped my notice.’
    • ‘If you're keeping notes about continuity errors, check out the crew commentary.’
    • ‘There's very little sense of time and continuity throughout the film, making for one that's a little confusing chronologically.’
    1. 2.1 The linking of broadcast items, especially by a spoken commentary.
      • ‘Whilst not the first face to be seen on the channel, Muriel Young, who died on 24 March 2001, was one of the fledgling network's first female continuity announcers.’
      • ‘Those continuity announcers have also died with the stars of yesteryear.’
      • ‘What happened to the continuity announcers, and their studio?’
      • ‘The BBC Television Service continuity announcers such as Valerie Pitts used these studios to anchor the single channel's programmes.’
      • ‘Paul's voice adopted the exaggerated tones of a TV continuity announcer.’
      • ‘Rather worryingly, one of the drivers I heard this afternoon sounded uncannily like a BBC continuity announcer I know.’
      • ‘With the reshuffle in 1968, Colin took his chance to apply for continuity jobs around the network, including at the new Yorkshire Television.’
      • ‘In fact she turned down the role and headed back to Wales, aware that the company that robbed her of her first television job were about to start broadcasting and would need a team of continuity announcers.’
      • ‘Did they think we would pay more attention to her than the regular continuity announcer?’
      • ‘Granted, a talent for arithmetic is not a CV prerequisite for your average continuity announcer, but the figure seemed a bit excessive, to say the least.’
      • ‘He'd be a terrible continuity announcer on Radio 4, that's for certain.’
      • ‘This was seen on the BBC, as Ulster Television would use their continuity announcers to do the same.’
      • ‘The adult education programme, religious service or sports outside broadcast would fade from view and the duty continuity announcer appear in vision.’
      • ‘Baker's stint, which begins at 7pm and ends at 9.30 pm, is thought to be the first time the BBC has used a celebrity as a continuity announcer.’
      • ‘A highly successful model, Pamela went on to become a continuity announcer.’
      • ‘The formal presentation that was often a requirement in the dress of in-vision continuity announcers has continued in another area of presenting on television and that is the news.’
      • ‘Increasingly desperate methods are being used to make this shoddy solution of minimised continuity announcements seem effective.’
      • ‘John Benson was regarded by many in the trade, as the definitive continuity announcer of the sixties.’
      • ‘We literally had to control all the sound and vision as the continuity announcer would do.’
      • ‘Graham Roberts was a continuity announcer on Yorkshire Television for 22 years and was a presenter of news and features programmes.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French continuite, from Latin continuitas, from continuare continue from continuus (see continuous).

Pronunciation:

continuity

/ˌkäntəˈn(y)o͞oədē/