Definition of continuance in US English:

continuance

noun

  • 1formal The state of remaining in existence or operation.

    ‘his interests encouraged him to favor the continuance of war’
    • ‘The effectiveness of planning agencies in managing the war led to their continuance in postwar organizations and relationships.’
    • ‘Well, putting an end to any uncertainty about the band's continuance, they are back with a new album and a new lease on life.’
    • ‘For her, continuance of her government is not important but the implementation of her agenda.’
    • ‘I have this right because in small part I am responsible for his existence, its beginning and continuance.’
    • ‘Growing numbers believe that these humanist aspirations are essential for the well-being and continuance of our species.’
    • ‘The continuance of the South-East's competitive advantage continues to act as a magnet for both firms and skilled individuals.’
    • ‘What is required are those values that establish stability and continuance and ensure enhancement of complex constructs of relativer life durations.’
    • ‘Business continuance focuses on the timely resumption of business operations, which is dependent on access to critical data and applications within a reasonable time frame.’
    • ‘In a truly participatory democratic society, an educated and skilled population is essential to its continuance.’
    • ‘If it finds closure of these schools impossible, it can allow continuance of a few deserving ones with due recognition and ask the remaining to close shop.’
    • ‘We are trying to resolve the issues to try to ensure further continuance of a major company.’
    • ‘The first indication of governance would be in the initiation or continuance of policies on infrastructure.’
    • ‘My paintings and ceramics come from research on India's cynical notion of time and continuance.’
    • ‘India is at a very crucial crossroads and only courageous adherence to the letter and spirit of its constitution will ensure its continuance as a time-tested secular democratic Republic.’
    • ‘And like a young woman, the idea of a trade union was sexy, alluring and necessary for continuance of the worker state.’
    • ‘The continuance of proxy voting in the French chamber of deputies for 35 years after it was banned by the 1958 Constitution is another of many examples.’
    • ‘Sadly, given all the real-life examples of devastating data loss, many companies still have not learned the lesson about data disasters and business continuance.’
    • ‘The continuance of existence depends on another Being beyond the human realm.’
    • ‘The question is control over borders and continuance of territory.’
    • ‘Instead we can only hope that the odd fleeting moment of inspiration surfaces on what is destined to be an increasingly irrelevant continuance.’
    continuation, carrying on, prolongation, protraction
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    1. 1.1 The time for which a situation or action lasts.
      ‘the trademarks shall be used only during the continuance of this agreement’
      • ‘Consistent testing of business continuance processes is also critical to evaluating compliance.’
      • ‘An organization's ability to access its archived data instantly is crucial to business continuance and, hence, the storage-network design.’
      • ‘He recognised their role in defending the nationalists and he saw their continuance in the long term as yet another string to his negotiating bow with London.’
      • ‘After 1945, and even after the regulations of 1948 came into force, the threat was for some years obscured by the continuance of wartime controls over the metals of which the plates are made.’
      • ‘The continuance of a free and unfettered press is of critical importance to a free and democratic society.’
      • ‘As mentioned earlier, many companies depend upon tape backup for business continuance while neglecting the impact on recovery, should there be a regional disruption.’
      • ‘In addition, massive data volume growth is increasing the importance of near-line and off-line storage for disaster recovery and business continuance.’
      • ‘Basque culture underwent a revival in the late 19th century, which ensured its continuance into the 20th century.’
      • ‘Affective commitment has been shown to have a positive impact on prosocial behaviours while continuance commitment undermines prosocial behaviours.’
      • ‘How do you maintain high-speed access to current corporate information while you protect and secure business continuance with little or no downtime?’
      • ‘Appealing to both forces, we ascribe interruption to perceptions and continuance to objects.’
      • ‘The United States bears a heavy responsibility for the continuance of this dire situation.’
      • ‘The committee wish to thank everyone for the marvellous support in the past and look forward to its continuance in the future.’
      • ‘Results show the very strong influence of friendships on tobacco initiation and continuance among this national sample of adolescents.’
      • ‘Business continuance is a critical function that organizations are facing.’
      • ‘To address the current business continuance demands, a new data availability and file recovery model is needed.’
      • ‘This is a trend which likely reflected the growth and continuance of an episodic high-risk form of drinking.’
      • ‘The associative series gives form to and foregrounds the idea of continuance, embodying the way the past inheres in and deforms the present.’
      • ‘I see them all as they were in those days and perhaps that conveys upon them, at least for my lifetime, a kind of continuance.’
      • ‘Welty's leadership has been critical to the program's creation - and its continuance.’
      duration, period, term
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    2. 1.2 The state of remaining in a particular position or condition.
      ‘the king's ministers depended on his favor for their continuance in office’
      • ‘He also denied that there was discontent brewing among party workers over his continuance in the office.’
      • ‘In each case, it seems to be necessary to convince the court that continuance in office of a particular executor, trustee or administrator would be likely to prevent the trust being properly carried out.’
      • ‘Nor with some bizarre notion that the bishops must continue in their offices merely for the sake of continuance.’
      • ‘Like a country evangelical church, the first courthouse encouraged the growth and continuance of a local patriarchal community.’
      • ‘Thus, it cannot tolerate continuance of a force representing the former conditions.’
  • 2US Law
    A postponement or an adjournment.

    ‘if this man's testimony is important, I will grant a continuance’
    • ‘We had 29 continuances before our case was heard.’
    • ‘Most judges would grant a trial continuance under those circumstances to avoid prejudice to either side.’
    • ‘He asked for and was granted a continuance, and the issue would be revisited at a later date.’
    • ‘Perhaps their attorney has been getting continuances for them.’
    • ‘In American justice, all appeals and continuances in a case build upon the initial hearing, so it doesn't surprise me that the Judge was knocking this guy's appeals out left and right.’
    deferral, deferment, delay, putting back, putting off, rescheduling, adjournment, shelving, suspension
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from continuer ‘continue’, from Latin continuare, from continuus (see continuous).

Pronunciation

continuance

/kənˈtinyo͞oəns//kənˈtɪnjuəns/