Definition of constitutionalism in English:

constitutionalism

noun

  • 1Constitutional government.

    • ‘A wide variety of institutional forms, many of which do not resemble American constitutionalism, can express and secure respect for pluralism.’
    • ‘Put positively, at the top now was not the emancipation of the working class or even the liberation of third world peoples from imperialism, but rather democracy, due process, constitutionalism, and human rights.’
    • ‘The corporate state they are working to create is formally based on democratic rhetoric, constitutionalism, and free elections, but it is profoundly anti-democratic in practice.’
    • ‘Her public statements often convey a frustratingly general commitment to constitutionalism and democracy in a language easily understood by the mass of the population.’
    • ‘The puzzle that needs to be answered is then whether the post-Cold War peace is sustained by hegemony, or by a form of constitutionalism.’
    • ‘In this richer sense of the term, Rex's society has not embraced constitutionalism because the rules defining his authority impose no constitutional limits.’
    • ‘Moreover, executive power, able to act quickly and decisively, is often at odds with both democracy and liberal constitutionalism and is sometimes able to override the mechanisms of both.’
    • ‘The notable thing is not the emergence of popular constitutionalism; it is that popular constitutionalism has so little resonance among the people.’
    • ‘From the perspective of promoting human rights, is it desirable for the judiciary to have donned the didactic roles of pedagogues for democracy and constitutionalism?’
    • ‘Levels of income, forms of democratic constitutionalism, and cultural regard for education are all determinants in the plight of children in the workforce.’
    • ‘There is simply no question that getting some form of constitutionalism and some form of democratic governance would be better for the vast majority of non-democracies.’
    • ‘It has no necessary connection with democratic government or constitutionalism, however.’
    • ‘The challenges come in three areas: first, the argument that international law, rather than democracy and constitutionalism, is the best safeguard against immoral and ineffective acts in war.’
    • ‘He then explains why democratic processes in the absence of liberal constitutionalism and capitalism produce such states and catalogs their many troubles.’
    • ‘Indeed, if the British and American experience during the two world wars is any example, it bodes well for the resilience of constitutionalism in those two countries; and hopefully other democracies as well.’
    • ‘Conservative constitutionalism today requires taking back the original Constitution to restore the constitutional order and representative government.’
    • ‘The split will be between the two philosophies of big government statism and small government constitutionalism.’
    • ‘War and emergencies are the acid tests of constitutionalism, especially of the type embodied in our written Constitution.’
    • ‘His work on liberalism, democracy and constitutionalism is theoretically interesting, but conservative by the standards of critical theory, and perhaps he would no longer claim to be a critical theorist.’
    • ‘And the first law of presidential leadership is to grasp the importance, and the pitfalls, as well as opportunities presented by constitutionalism - American style.’
    1. 1.1 Adherence to a system of constitutional government.
      • ‘The full exposition of his constitutionalism, presented in and around his analysis of the English constitution in book 11, develops these seeds.’
      • ‘His constitutionalism is grounded on a strong theory of the rule of law defined by. adherence to the constitution as the supreme law of the land.’
      • ‘It is basically an issue of constitutionalism.’
      • ‘This is the fundamental practical question of all constitutionalism.’
      • ‘Where is the proper observance of constitutionalism in that?’
      • ‘His constitutionalism empowered the courts, not Congress.’

Pronunciation:

constitutionalism

/ˌkänstəˈt(y)o͞oSH(ə)nəˌlizəm/