Definition of consternation in English:

consternation

noun

  • Feelings of anxiety or dismay, typically at something unexpected.

    ‘I always welcomed clover, much to the consternation of the neighbors’
    • ‘Filing through the border control, I know that my arrival is going to cause consternation amongst the officials.’
    • ‘The decision by New York's leaders to borrow the words of others has been greeted with consternation in some quarters.’
    • ‘Our media will then proceed to trumpet this beyond all reason as cause for alarm and consternation.’
    • ‘His remarks caused consternation on both sides of the Atlantic.’
    • ‘He encourages his followers to rise against the oppressors, which causes much consternation in the Vatican.’
    • ‘I waved him over and he rushed towards me with an expression of consternation, looking over his shoulder.’
    • ‘If the names don't confuse you, the psychological web that these tricksters weave will cause consternation.’
    • ‘After six illegal balls, consternation grew among the home players and supporters.’
    • ‘Advances have been made, but not without some consternation from the right over the past six years.’
    • ‘These people are normally quickly eliminated, but they can cause real consternation among their neighbours.’
    • ‘Jill, your book has a happy ending that created consternation among some early readers.’
    • ‘One person will find his stimulant in an emergency while another may feel anxiety and consternation.’
    • ‘This guideline caused consternation among representatives of these companies in these regions.’
    • ‘This decision has caused widespread consternation among those opposed to the directive.’
    • ‘A shallow pit is dug with initial gusto, to my mother's mild consternation.’
    • ‘You can horrify the tabloids and cause consternation in the wings.’
    • ‘The latest scheme has caused similar consternation among traders.’
    • ‘There's some consternation about a foreign policy survey released in Australia early this week.’
    • ‘The central message of the book caused the most consternation.’
    • ‘There was also consternation at measures allowing police to go barefoot and even shirtless in stations.’
    dismay, perturbation, anxiety, distress, disquiet, disquietude, discomposure, angst, trepidation
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin consternatio(n-), from the verb consternare ‘lay prostrate, terrify’ (see consternate).

Pronunciation

consternation

/ˌkänstərˈnāSH(ə)n//ˌkɑnstərˈneɪʃ(ə)n/