Main definitions of consort in English

: consort1consort2

consort1

noun

  • 1A wife, husband, or companion, in particular the spouse of a reigning monarch.

    • ‘Then he could ransom the princess back to the Queen Mother and her consort.’
    • ‘Apart from the reign of William III, consorts of monarchs have had no constitutional significance whatsoever.’
    • ‘To keep it manageable, readable and above all, entertaining, I've confined myself to reigning British monarchs only, not their various consorts and children; saving a few mostly present-day exceptions.’
    • ‘Queen Margrethe's consort, Prince Henrik, is French and very knowledgeable about culinary matters.’
    • ‘This set of furniture was, therefore, certainly not made for a reigning monarch or consort, as has usually been assumed.’
    • ‘In 1820 George IV's attempt to divorce his consort led to the royal family's dirty linen being washed in the courts.’
    • ‘If you wanted to be generous, you could explain away the Empress' comments by pointing to the fact that she is of a different generation, one where women played traditional roles and royal consorts dutifully obeyed centuries-old rules.’
    • ‘As the wife of the president, Mary spent lavishly and entertained on the scale of a royal consort.’
    • ‘Queen Victoria, her consort Prince Albert and the Royal children lined a balcony of Hull's premier hotel and waved to the crowds of children below dutifully singing the National Anthem.’
    • ‘Years ago, on a Royal tour of Canada, the Queen and her consort, the Duke of Edinburgh stopped in Bumcrack, Sask., for a Royal visit and state dinner.’
    • ‘It was at this point that a North Malabar princess, the consort of the Chirakkal Raja, arrived for worship at the temple.’
    • ‘He had lost a fine wife, an elegant consort, a selfless companion.’
    • ‘To think that the absence of the monarch and her consort would mean so much less attention at the Guildhall is ridiculous.’
    • ‘He was certainly closely acquainted with her before her marriage and, according to three 16th-cent. accounts, confessed to the king that she had been his mistress and was not fit to be a royal consort.’
    • ‘Certain batik designs, like the parangrusak motif, are still considered sacred as they were specially designed for sultans, their consorts and crown princes.’
    • ‘The couple have carefully sidestepped the issue; when he ascends the throne, she will be known as the princess consort.’
    • ‘As Queen Anne's consort, Prince George would have felt very much at home with Dahl's portraits of court ladies.’
    • ‘It is one thing to live life as a movie star, under the constant glare of one kind of spotlight and restrictions in one's private life but quite another to be the consort of a reigning Prince and representing the citizens of an entire nation.’
    • ‘Ceremonial royal funerals are for those members of the Royal Family who hold high military rank, for the consort of the sovereign and for the heir to the throne.’
    • ‘Three centuries later the history of Queen Adelaide again illustrated the importance of the role of the royal consort.’
    partner, companion, mate, helpmate, helpmeet
    spouse, husband, wife
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A ship sailing in company with another.
      • ‘Her consort found her two days later with all of the crew completely drunk on rum taken from the cargo.’
      • ‘There was need of haste, for the ship's consort was expected in a day or two.’
      • ‘Tirpitz and her consorts had slipped northwards along the Norwegian coast, from where she and her consorts could wreak havoc on a convoy - or break out into the Atlantic to prowl with greater freedom.’
      • ‘Westralia has re-established herself as the consort of choice when the going gets tough.’
      • ‘The heavy guns of the besieged ship and her consort boomed out time and again with no luck while the smaller defensive guns were unable to pierce the heavy shields - when they managed to land a hit that is.’
      • ‘The first ship and its consorts attacked from the port stern and slightly below, and the second ship and its consorts attacked from the starboard bow and slightly above.’
      • ‘As his new consort he purchased from Governor King a small, colonial-built vessel, the Casuarina, to help him with the continued close charting of the coast.’
      • ‘He was in no mood to risk a delay that might bring in the pirate ship's consort, which was daily expected, so he sent his men on board her that evening (Tuesday) and fired her.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
Pronunciation: /kənˈsôrt//ˈkänˌsôrt/
consort with
  • 1 Habitually associate with (someone), typically with the disapproval of others.

    ‘you chose to consort with the enemy’
    • ‘It places much store on personal friendship and thus has not consorted with his political enemies.’
    • ‘What does your mother-in-law think about these boys her daughter's husband consorts with?’
    • ‘In pursuing their goals, leaders and locales might consort with both the United States and its enemies.’
    • ‘He has appeased, prevaricated and pretended, maybe because he is a man of faith himself, with a Catholic wife who consorts with crystals.’
    • ‘He spent his time consorting with prostitutes, getting into fistfights, and scribbling his thoughts down on napkins, all in various stages of intoxication.’
    • ‘He shouldn't even be consorting with the servants!’
    • ‘Since when did serious socialists consort with millionaire It-girls?’
    • ‘A high-society events organiser who ignores the ongoing hordes of prostitutes and junior female staff consorting with her husband, she is a million miles away from being the long-suffering victim she could so easily be.’
    • ‘For here on, I will consider anyone consorting with these barbarians to be my enemy.’
    • ‘The fact that he was consorting with people arrested for football violence and seemed to be known for his activities by police when tens of thousands of ordinary fans were not, was also persuasive.’
    • ‘He prefers to go on as he came in - playing shabby politics, consorting with creatures from the abyss, contributing his miserable mite to the destruction of free government among us.’
    • ‘My lovely and talented daughter is consorting with the enemy this year, so there should be some competition in the target-shooting and archery events.’
    • ‘Most did not consort with the enemy in a time of war.’
    • ‘And here was a man who knowingly consorted with the enemy.’
    • ‘Even investment banks (which will consort with anyone) suddenly decline to be associated with the former president.’
    • ‘Maybe he should have thought a little harder before consorting with the enemy.’
    • ‘This explains why his students are a cultish clique, which is comfortable only when preaching to the converted and consorting with the like-minded.’
    • ‘Residents speak of young girls consorting with aging foreign men for the opportunity to dine in restaurants and buy clothes - or perhaps to marry and go abroad.’
    • ‘They drink too much, stay up too late, hang around dodgy parts of town and consort with older men.’
    • ‘After all, the whole point of a summer holiday is to check out from reality, and what could be better escapism than ten days consorting with a an exotic lover whom you're never going to see again?’
    associate, keep company, mix, mingle, go around, spend time, socialize, fraternize, have dealings, rub shoulders
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1consort with/toarchaic Agree or be in harmony with.

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a companion or colleague): via French from Latin consors sharing, partner from con- together with + sors, sort- lot, destiny The verb senses are probably influenced by similar senses (now obsolete) of the verb sort.

Pronunciation:

consort

Noun/ˈkänsôrt/

consort

Verb/kənˈsôrt//ˈkänˌsôrt/

Main definitions of consort in English

: consort1consort2

consort2

noun

  • A small group of musicians performing together, typically playing instrumental music of the Renaissance period.

    ‘a consort of viols’
    • ‘Based in Amsterdam, The Fortuna Consort is an early music group exploring renaissance consort music in the form of recorder trio and lute.’
    • ‘He employed five violists, two keyboard players, a consort of singers, and he had at least four organs at the time of his death in 1612.’
    • ‘Music ranges from ball-room to Klezmer, from pop to classics; people have even been known to entertain with a consort of viols, but this is too quiet for most tastes.’
    • ‘Stylistically, the program goes many different places - from Gabrieli-like polyphony for the chorus, brass, and organ, to intimate interludes for string consorts.’
    • ‘By the same token, the unspecified six-part ritornelli in Dixit dominus may well be intended for a wind consort.’
    • ‘The consort will be performing excerpts from JS Bach's Christmas Oratorio with organ, trumpets and timpani.’
    • ‘The pitch and scoring of the verse-anthem adaptation of the consort song present some serious problems.’
    • ‘At first, the likelihood that broken consort music would be audible from behind curtains seemed small - unless the fabric was very fine, which is why so few productions adopted curtains.’
    • ‘Other timbres no longer carry their original significance: cornets for dignitaries not high enough in rank to merit trumpets, hautboys for banquets, consorts of flutes or recorders for rituals of death and transfiguration.’
    • ‘The first half of the concert features the singers performing madrigals, interspersed with instrumental music of the same period - mostly played by recorder consort.’
    • ‘For singers, these intensive weeks offer classes in sight-reading, aural tests and consort singing, and advice on choral scholarships receives a high priority.’
    • ‘Music specifically for viol consorts became increasingly sophisticated, with elaborate contrapuntal fantasias or ‘Fancies’.’
    • ‘This is not an idiomatic organ part but a reduction of a consort texture, almost certainly in five real parts throughout.’
    • ‘They decided to explore renaissance consort music in the form of recorder trio with lute.’
    • ‘Their great finesse and qualities of ensemble were displayed in works ranging from Elizabethan consort music to the Hungarian avant-garde.’
    • ‘This is a new consort still deciding on its identity, so the concert was very much a case of ‘interim report on work in progress’.’
    • ‘Moreover, given that violin consorts at the time usually played in four or five parts while wind consorts tended to play in six, it is likely that the instruments intended were the former rather than the latter.’
    • ‘The close relationship between the consort song and the Elizabethan verse anthem makes it at least possible that both genres began with the same scoring: voices and viols.’
    • ‘Some more consort music is known from other sources, but there is not much of it, and this book is concerned only with the contents of the 1604 edition.’
    • ‘This strongly implies that even in the Durham version the verse material, as in the original consort song, was meant to be sung by a treble.’

Origin

Late 16th century: earlier form of concert.

Pronunciation:

consort

/ˈkänsôrt/