Definition of connive in English:

connive

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Secretly allow (something considered immoral, illegal, wrong, or harmful) to occur.

    ‘you have it in your power to connive at my escape’
    • ‘I believe that most public servants like their jobs, believe that they're acting in the public interest, would not consciously assist in or connive in something that was clearly morally wrong, let alone criminal.’
    • ‘As the next general election is now much closer, we should all be examining which political parties and politicians are fighting for Britain and which are conniving in the process of plunging us ever deeper into the EU.’
    • ‘Banks do not generally satisfy the ‘triggers terms’ of environmental legislation such as carrying on, causing, knowingly permitting, or consenting to and conniving in environmental damage.’
    • ‘Is it the dishonest claimants or those members of the professions who stand to gain so much and lose so little by conniving at their lack of scruple?’
    • ‘None of these people want to be fingered for conniving in lying to the Australian people, let alone on a matter like this.’
    • ‘We have handed special advisers immense power by conniving in their attempts to manage the flow of news.’
    • ‘There are cries of how lawyers and others have allegedly connived in the misapplication of justice.’
    • ‘Even as the threats of war loomed and grew more certain, Labor and the conservative parties connived in the emasculation of our fighting services.’
    • ‘And scarily, it is green activists who are conniving at the abuse and murder of rural Britain.’
    • ‘First he works for the Labour government and, by his own admission, connives in the government's systematic lying.’
    • ‘The volunteers themselves typically connived in the shift, since those who chose to go on the public payroll were grandfathered into the new municipal unions.’
    • ‘Furthermore, even if people can prove that they have been persecuted, they must also prove that the state connived in that persecution at high level.’
    • ‘It featured some horrendous claims about anthropologists abusing a South American tribe and even conniving in their deaths from introduced diseases.’
    • ‘But the time is long past for such absurd mythology, which has provided a perennial alibi for those who connived in the destruction of the mining industry.’
    • ‘I feel that those who portray an aggressive, vulgar, debased attitude towards life are conniving in that life, and I think publishers should reject them.’
    • ‘The accusation that the king aimed at increasing the royal prerogative or deliberately connived at secret influence will not bear scrutiny.’
    • ‘But what was less explicable than this working-class defeatism was to hear those who regarded themselves as progressive liberals conniving in it.’
    • ‘This is an extraordinary state of affairs; an Act of Parliament is barely on the statute book before the Government brazenly connives at preventing it from taking effect.’
    • ‘This was not a minor breach of behaviour; it was murder connived at by agents of the State.’
    • ‘Some accuse the manufacturers and retailers of conniving in the premature death of old technology.’
    deliberately ignore, overlook, not take into consideration, disregard, pass over, gloss over, take no notice of, take no account of, make allowances for, turn a blind eye to, close one's eyes to, shut one's eyes to, wink at, blink at, excuse, pardon, forgive, condone, let someone off with, let go, let pass
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Conspire to do something considered immoral, illegal, or harmful.
      ‘the government had connived with security forces in permitting murder’
      • ‘Thoughts, erratic and conniving, in a word evil, ran through her mind.’
      • ‘There is no place for anyone who condones it, conceals it or connives with it.’
      • ‘Each wants to win, and to do so they must connive and scheme.’
      • ‘She was strict, manipulative, and conniving, but she was also generous with her abilities and caring.’
      • ‘They are scheming and conniving and sometimes thoughtlessly cruel, too.’
      • ‘The environmentalists have connived with the logging-to-prevent-fires scam for political reasons.’
      • ‘I am fierce, powerful, ambitious, and if need be, conniving.’
      • ‘The woman who loves him struggles and connives to find the evidence that will clear him.’
      • ‘Married to a multimillionaire, she has hustled, harangued, conspired and connived to get Athens to the finish line.’
      • ‘I don't really care about catching up on how my beloved soap characters have been scheming and conniving.’
      • ‘Equally protean and conniving, she is his partner in crime and spirit.’
      • ‘She's good at conniving and scheming and she knows it, no doubt she will twist the police against me.’
      • ‘It was one of those rare smiles that had nothing behind it, nothing sinister, malicious or conniving, it was a true smile.’
      • ‘The two were found to be conniving with an inter-state flesh trade gang, whose three members were arrested by the police last Friday.’
      • ‘All the lies, deceit, conniving and games I endured while I was with him have made me frightened to date again.’
      • ‘He gets out of the fenced backyard, then connives to hide the evidence.’
      • ‘And even worse, he may take the weekends to plan and conspire and connive and make sure that he isn't caught when he goes back on his shooting spree during the week.’
      • ‘He said Government had received reports that the illegal trade involved foreigners who allegedly connived with the local authority for illegal issuance of timber licences.’
      • ‘He had allegedly used his influence to enable his wife and children to engage in illegal activities, accepted valuable gifts as bribes and connived with his two secretaries to commit crimes.’
      • ‘In China, on-air conniving by reality-show contestants could be lost in the fog of political correctness.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from French conniver or Latin connivere shut the eyes (to) from con- together + an unrecorded word related to nictare to wink.

Pronunciation:

connive

/kəˈnīv/