Definition of connective in English:

connective

adjective

  • Connecting.

    ‘connective words and phrases’
    • ‘As in a dream, we see here the generation of a connective logic among objects and images that are not otherwise linked.’
    • ‘The railway and its connective powers shaped the character, location, and economy of the small town on the Great Plains of North America.’
    • ‘But, if you're lucky enough to possess sufficient material wealth for a connection and a connective device, the network itself imposes no obstacles to participation.’
    • ‘These ideas, embedded in America's founding documents, are the connective cords by which national unity and civic identity have been maintained in the United States from the 1770s until today.’
    • ‘This result is compatible with the findings of previous studies, which indicated that grid and connective networks had worse safety records compared with modern layouts relying on many low-connectivity streets.’
    • ‘A model friend of hers told her about a procedure called a leukotomy, an operation in which connective fibres are cut, severing the connection between two different areas of the brain.’
    • ‘I find this helpful as it helps me to break out of word-thinking, and sometimes ‘analysing’ a word in terms of images sets off further associations and connective ideas.’
    • ‘It is sometimes a question of style - think of the ‘technical’ innovations of black music, or the empathic and connective revolt of the ‘movement of movements’ against capitalism.’
    • ‘They also modeled and practiced relational rights and responsibilities embedded in patriarchal connective networks, as they taught rights and responsibilities to their children.’
    • ‘We tend to take in static works quickly and process the information slowly letting the sequences of a show play out, the connective meanings and conjunctions emerging later.’
    • ‘Most added words were two- or three-letter connective words that do not significantly change meaning.’
    • ‘In the section below, I explain the construct of the connective self, patriarchal connectivity, and relational rights and responsibilities, which I found to be locally upheld ideas.’
    • ‘While all three groups employ formal strategies that distance their work from mainstream rock practices, their surface-level musical differences force us to look more deeply for connective threads.’
    • ‘New hardware, software, networking gear, and wireless devices are being woven together by the connective power of the Internet into a potent, upsetting force.’
    • ‘By that I mean he had a connective mind, one characterized by a wide, ever-growing range of interests, but one that could synthesize and cut to the heart of an issue.’
    • ‘Finally, the outer layer of connective cells surrounding the interior portions of the eye, a thin cartilaginous or bony tissue known as the sclera, is formed entirely from migratory neural crest cells.’
    • ‘The participants were exposed to medical, social and domestic aspects of mental retardation and therapeutic intervention and connective strategies and the need to help the retarded to lead an independent life.’
    • ‘However, there is no explicit connection - the verse about captivity and the sword may serve as a divider between two passages about beasts, rather than a connective statement.’
    • ‘The digital age has been predominantly focused on the spatial dimension of recombinant, connective technologies, a preoccupation crystallized in the totemic cyberspace of the computer network.’
    • ‘In the non-diagetic music there are fluid connective moments where Africa meets Mississippi meets modern Los Angeles with just the appropriate intimations of the conflict that had been wrought by spatial upheaval.’

noun

  • 1Something that connects, in particular.

    • ‘Early poems show her interest in dreams and the unconscious, irrational connectives, and multiple planes of perception.’
    • ‘To work efficiently, the message must have a context that the receiver comprehends, use a code that the participants share, and operate via a contact, a physical and psychological connective that each participant can enter.’
    1. 1.1Grammar
      A word or phrase whose function is to link linguistic units together.
      • ‘While one of them advised against using ‘while’ as a logical connective, I promptly found two such usages in the introduction to the same book.’
      • ‘The analysis of as such as a pure connective, liberated both from its antecedent and from its target of predication, may also apply to many of the examples where the antecedent and the modified noun phase are unexpectedly inaccessible.’
      • ‘In addition, the long-distance binding/logophoric domain in East Asian languages can also be introduced by a logocentric complementizer or connective.’
      • ‘The assertional analysis identified relationships between nouns, connectives, and operators in phrases.’
      • ‘For now, here is a quick run-down of how to use connectives to make complex sentences from simple ones.’
    2. 1.2Zoology
      A bundle of nerve fibers connecting two nerve centers or ganglia, especially in invertebrate animals.
      • ‘BP102 stains the anterior commissure, the posterior commissure, and the longitudinal connectives.’
      • ‘In other experiments brains were removed from animals by cutting all nerve roots, except for the pedal-pedal connectives.’
      • ‘To demonstrate the role of the type 12 interneuron in mediating swim speed change we cut the pleural-pedal connective to remove the influence of this interneuron from the swim circuit.’
      • ‘A common modification occurring in many hetero- and hoplonemerteans is a dorsal vessel and transverse connectives.’
      • ‘One branch ran through the cerebro-pleural connective into the ipsilateral pleural ganglion.’

Pronunciation:

connective

/kəˈnektiv/