Definition of confection in English:

confection

noun

  • 1A dish or delicacy made with sweet ingredients.

    ‘a whipped chocolate and cream confection’
    • ‘Maybe it's psychological, but of course, chocolate is mostly associated with bars, toppings, truffles and other sweet confections.’
    • ‘‘They sell coffees until 11 in the morning, chocolate confections from 11 to 3, and people stop in and buy a box of chocolates when they go home at night,’ he says.’
    • ‘Chocolat de couverture is the special type of chocolate that pâtissiers and chocolate makers use for their confections.’
    • ‘Truth to tell, some dessert confections here gave me sugar fits, too.’
    • ‘Another tasty way to show off your cordials is in luxuriously rich ice cream toppings, sweets and confections such as truffles.’
    • ‘Daily specials keep things lively, from a haunting goat-cheese flan to a melting confection of strawberries and coconut ice cream.’
    • ‘Whipped cream adds a touch of luxury to almost any dessert and is essential for certain sweet confections such as ice cream sundaes.’
    • ‘Too bad the final dish is an over-baked confection that falls well below its primary chef's abilities.’
    • ‘It adds interest to steamed rice and is often used in fruit salads, pudding, homemade ice cream and other confections.’
    • ‘The event pits local chocolatiers against one another to create the tastiest confection.’
    • ‘In these honeycombs he made the confection sweeter than before.’
    • ‘But then again, such creations as eel ice cream are a revelation to the world of seafood and confections.’
    • ‘Commercially available forms of these enhanced proteins have applications in a number of processed food applications, she adds, such as frozen desserts, confections, sauces and cheeses.’
    • ‘She had multiple servings of each sweet pie, cake, confection, tort, ice cream, bun and pastry they had.’
    • ‘It was good enough to eat for dessert - the precise use to which I was putting it, having bypassed the assortment of very sweet Indian confections on offer that day.’
    • ‘There was also a tottering confection called the ‘chocolate pistachio pinnacle,’ which seemed dry and a little structurally unsound to me.’
    • ‘Today it is used in a variety of sweet foods and beverages, particularly chocolate, confections, bakery goods, perfumery, and, obviously, ice cream.’
    • ‘Equally important is helwa, a sweet confection based on clarified butter, honey, and spices.’
    • ‘Chocolatier Joël Durand flavors his confections with home-grown rosemary and thyme, almond praline, bitter honey - even black olives.’
    • ‘This is a good way to use up the melted chocolate leftover from other chocolate confections.’
    delicacy, tasty morsel, titbit, fancy, luxury, treat, nibble, savoury, appetizer, bonne bouche, bonbon
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An elaborately constructed thing, especially a frivolous one.
      ‘the city is a classical confection of shimmering gold’
      • ‘And yes, his canvases are gorgeous - well-executed mixed media confections filled with vivid iconography and fresh colour combinations.’
      • ‘A lovely pop confection, that whistling riff has been stuck in my head for the last 20 years.’
      • ‘Galliano has always had a playful spirit with clothes, literally whipping them into confections of pure fantasy.’
      • ‘She was an exotic delicacy he wanted to try, a sweet confection from a far-off land.’
      • ‘Allegretto was an insouciant confection - played with vigor and bravado.’
      • ‘There is very little point: the songs are samey; the lyrics nothing like the witty confections they are lauded as.’
      • ‘The sweet confection is to be sampled by a group which has somehow gained the title of the Six Wise Men - the leadership of Scotland's governing parties, engaged in the deal-making that makes coalitions work.’
      • ‘This has it all, a peculiar confection of tall tales and reality blended together in a strange and moving way.’
      • ‘Billed as showcases of glamour and infotainment, both are classic confections of ignorance and candlelight.’
      • ‘It is a mark of the limitations of current popular literary criticism that the obituaries speak only of such confections, wrongheaded ancestry and extra-literary politics.’
      • ‘The fairy-tale confection of John's architecture lit up purple and white.’
      • ‘The flowers are small, pink and white confections born on the end of each branch, each endowed with a sharp, sweet fragrance that carries for yards in still air.’
      • ‘This is a charming confection of excerpts from old favourites mixed with modern pieces.’
      • ‘During the 19th century most countries developed a voracious appetite for paintings of historical events, running the gamut from fancy-dress confections to work with more serious aims.’
      • ‘The creation of such a universal confection for the eye, by means of printed poetry or fiction or history or essays or memoirs and so on, isn't possible.’
      • ‘A final work, Unravel, was a mainly white confection of foam-core strips, slivered paper plates and disassembled Chinese lanterns that descended from the ceiling in a vortex.’
      • ‘This violinist has played the Romantic confections of Wieniawski and Tchaikovsky, but Schnittke doesn't give him much of an opportunity to show how pretty his tone can be.’
      • ‘The film serves up a sugarcoated confection that will make anyone with a taste for Nabokov gag.’
      • ‘Academics will call the book a childish confection and analyze it as media myth and pop psychology.’
      • ‘She is a fur-laden confection of fashion, from her enormous hat to her dainty boots.’
    2. 1.2 A fashionable or elaborate article of women's dress.
      ‘she was wearing some white confection with an enormous satin bow’
      • ‘The costume was a confection of palest pink mesh with sparkly sprays of rhinestones.’
      • ‘For January, we picked Eve in this really kind of cotton/silk confection by Louis Vuitton.’
      • ‘The dozens of bridal magazines on sale are nothing more than glorified catalogues, advertising fairy princess confections of corsets, bows and buttons intended to make you look like someone you have never met before.’
      • ‘Rita D.'s crystal confections adorned necks at Nada's show Tuesday at Toronto's Fashion Week and, for those paying attention, there were also glimpses of new designs during the models' brief walk up and down the runway.’
      • ‘The entire confection would be crowned with elaborate wigs, tall feathers, and huge hats.’
      • ‘‘She'd applaud me, and tell you to throw the bleeding corset overboard,’ Sonia glared hatefully at the pink, ruffly, lacy confection of a dress that awaited her.’
      • ‘In Cavendish's life and in her plays, lavish confections symbolize the moment of transformation, drawn as a liminal state of existence, a threshold time of freedom and possibility.’
      • ‘The pink confection of a dress complemented her short frame and gentle curves perfectly.’
      • ‘Eva looks down at the confection of satin and lace, and blinks.’
      • ‘I remember one photo in particular of a model dancing across the page in a chiffon confection covered with roses.’
  • 2The action of mixing or compounding something.

    • ‘In the confection of senna it will be seen that the liquorice root has been discarded, while some little alteration has been admitted with respect to the other ingredients.’
    • ‘They tend also to entail independent research and the confection of term papers of varying lengths.’
    • ‘This allowed greater use of that process on the confection of prostheses compared to the brazing process.’

Origin

Middle English (in the general sense ‘something made by mixing’, especially a medicinal preparation): via Old French from Latin confectio(n-), from conficere ‘put together’ (see confect).

Pronunciation

confection

/kənˈfekSH(ə)n//kənˈfɛkʃ(ə)n/