Definition of conductor in English:

conductor

noun

  • 1A person who directs the performance of an orchestra or choir.

    ‘he was appointed principal conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra’
    • ‘In a really great Mahler performance, players and conductors collaborate - everybody works to maximum capacity.’
    • ‘Alsop is principal conductor of the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, which plays tomorrow night at the BBC Proms.’
    • ‘When Czech conductors and orchestras play Dvorák it sounds right and perfectly natural.’
    • ‘He returned to Manchester to join the Halle, then one of the world's greatest orchestras under its legendary conductor Sir John Barbirolli.’
    • ‘Using a heady combination of intellect and inspiration, the principal conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra is making it one of the world's great orchestras.’
    • ‘A superbly idiomatic collaboration between a virtuoso conductor and a stellar soloist!’
    • ‘The combination of a first rate chamber orchestra and a conductor giving of his best produced superb music making.’
    • ‘The music is from recordings by von Karajan and other well-known conductors and orchestras.’
    • ‘This leaves the orchestra without a conductor, and a musical cacophony verging on dissonance.’
    • ‘They are beautifully played, with intense commitment by the soloists and orchestras sensitively directed by the respective conductors.’
    • ‘But perhaps the most famous Italians of the period were performers: the conductor Arturo Toscanini and the tenor Enrico Caruso.’
    • ‘It brings me joy to see the whole process - conductor, orchestra, soloist - to see how it all comes together.’
    • ‘Two concerts were directed by volunteer band and orchestra conductors and attracted an audience of more than 2,000 people.’
    • ‘On his first visit to Barenboim, Lang played the Tchaikovsky concerto while the conductor played the orchestra part on a second piano.’
    • ‘This version is directed by Ann Wodeman, with musical director Alan Gardner conductor of Kendal Choral Society.’
    • ‘This is a compilation of ‘classical selections performed by American orchestras and conductors.’’
    • ‘He also served as music director, conductor, and guest conductor in symphony orchestras worldwide.’
    • ‘He has served as orchestra conductor, piano soloist, composer and arranger.’
    • ‘I met him briefly at an after-concert reception while he was the principal conductor of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.’
    • ‘Mascagni was a competent conductor of orchestral music as well as opera.’
  • 2British A person in charge of a train, streetcar, or other public conveyance, who collects fares and sells tickets.

    • ‘There is nothing remarkable about this, but a single person was acting as a conductor, rubbish collector, and guard.’
    • ‘Since many commuters do not understand the BMTC's jargon of stage, often, conductors collecting the fare become the target of their ire and abuse.’
    • ‘A private bus operator has introduced a hand-held ticketing machine, which allows conductors to print tickets a la railway booking clerks.’
    • ‘Most complaints in the past were about bus operators, who let drivers and conductors increase fares above a tolerable limit.’
    • ‘I was told staff were being encouraged to carry out their duties and commission was being offered to conductors for each ticket.’
    • ‘In England in those days, you had to give your ticket to the conductor at your destination.’
    • ‘The driver could collect fares, displacing the conductor.’
    • ‘The driver set off without a backward glance and the conductor began issuing tickets.’
    • ‘There have been calls for the operators to hire conductors because unreliable ticket machines have led to angry passengers missing trams.’
    • ‘Shortly after the train is departed, the conductor comes around collecting tickets.’
    • ‘There is nowhere to buy tickets so if the conductor doesn't turn up, what can I do?’
    • ‘The conductor sold me the ticket on the train and I got off at Burley in Wharfedale with a load of other people, all dressed in suits as I was.’
    • ‘He said he often saw people get off trains without paying because conductors had not collected fares.’
    • ‘But others say the majority of people behave on buses and employing a conductor would put up fares.’
    • ‘She claimed she found herself in trouble only after intervening in a ticket dispute between the conductor and a fellow passenger.’
    • ‘The conductor sold us ‘one-ways’ to Egton Bridge and said the line was sometimes busy on a Sunday and quite popular with walkers but seats were not reservable.’
    • ‘On alighting from the bus, the conductor handed over his ticket to him, revealing the fact that he had paid for his ticket.’
    escort, attendant, courier, pilot, usher, chaperone
    View synonyms
  • 3Physics
    A material or device that conducts or transmits heat, electricity, or sound, especially when regarded in terms of its capacity to do this.

    ‘graphite is a reasonably good conductor of electricity’
    • ‘Lead is not a good conductor of electricity, heat, sound, or vibrations.’
    • ‘Foam tends to increase skin temperature because foam materials and the air they entrap are generally poor conductors of heat.’
    • ‘Under this condition, an insulator, which previously prevented the flow of electricity, becomes a conductor.’
    • ‘The metal is a good conductor of heat and electricity.’
    • ‘Copper and its alloys are relatively good conductors of electricity and heat.’
    • ‘Here the thin gasses are composed of ionized particles and consequently act as electrical conductors.’
    • ‘It has a high melting point and is a good conductor of heat and electricity.’
    • ‘Electricity needs a conductor in order to move.’
    • ‘It is one of the best conductors of heat and electricity of all elements.’
    • ‘Can a laser be used as an electrical conductor between two points that are not in physical contact?’
    • ‘Metals are good electrical conductors because there are lots of free charges in them.’
    • ‘The loose electrons make it easy for electricity to flow through these materials, so they are known as electrical conductors.’
    • ‘A short circuit is simply a low resistance connection between the two conductors supplying electrical power to any circuit.’
    • ‘Fuel cells are conductors of electricity, not a source of energy.’
    • ‘With the exception of graphite, they are poor conductors of electricity.’
    • ‘These clouds would be excellent conductors of electricity and so would generate currents and distort Earth's magnetic field.’
    • ‘As electrons enter the conductor, they displace the electrons in the conductor's atoms.’
    • ‘Carbon is an excellent conductor of electricity.’
    • ‘The smaller the core and the poorer electrical conductor its material was, the faster the field would decay.’
    • ‘Incorporation of dissolved ions makes water a better conductor of electricity.’
    1. 3.1
      another term for lightning rod
      • ‘Examples of differing installation principles however could be shown where say other European National Standards hold roof conductors away from roof finishes, where in the UK these conductors are laid flat to the finished material.’
      • ‘Based in south west Scotland and south east England and operating on a national basis, we offer full lightning protection and conductor services.’
      • ‘This conductor is of the same type and cross-section as the down conductor(s) of the installation.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a military leader): via Old French from Latin conductor, from conducere ‘bring together’ (see conduct).

Pronunciation

conductor

/kənˈdəktər//kənˈdəktər/