Definition of concuss in US English:

concuss

verb

[with object]usually as adjective concussed
  • Hit the head of (a person or animal), causing temporary unconsciousness or confusion.

    ‘she was shaken, slightly concussed, and in no state to carry on’
    • ‘The injury to the back of his head may have stunned or concussed him but was not responsible for his death.’
    • ‘He was severely concussed and drifting in and out of consciousness.’
    • ‘We thought he was concussed but his mum told me not to let him go to sleep so I kept talking to him.’
    • ‘When we took Jake to hospital after he collapsed we just thought he was concussed.’
    • ‘Someone told him his dad was just concussed before taking him home.’
    • ‘Had he been concussed he would have been stood down for an automatic six days.’
    • ‘Overall, the findings of this study suggest a delay of cognitive recovery beyond the 1st day following injury in mildly concussed high school athletes.’
    • ‘Great bustards weigh rather more than quail, and when the first hunter was concussed the reaction was one of panic, and swift running for shelter.’
    • ‘The stretcher's on, and he looks like he's concussed.’
    • ‘Sgt Glyn White, of Hampshire police, said: ‘The victim was concussed and suffered severe bruising.’’
    • ‘Medical staff concluded he was concussed but there was no lasting brain damage.’
    • ‘If she could concuss him, then she might just buy herself some time to escape.’
    • ‘She was badly concussed but there are no broken bones and they are just keeping her in overnight for observation.’
    • ‘Or maybe I thought it was petrol fumes because I was concussed.’
    • ‘Leitch was concussed after taking a knock to the head and Clarkson's twisted ankle will keep him out for a week at least.’
    • ‘Slim was captured during the Battle of Kapyong after he was concussed by enemy shelling.’
    • ‘Doctors have said that you are much more likely to be concussed if you have had a concussion or neck trauma in the past.’
    • ‘His neck was broken, he was concussed and his face was cut in several places.’
    • ‘The blow to his head must have concussed him, for he saw two middle-aged women straighten up and walk briskly to the I.V. unit.’
    • ‘Nixon's dialogue is slightly concussed, and peppered with haw-haw, blue-collar cliché.’
    hit over the head, hit on the head, hit, strike, buffet, bang, knock, thwack, slug, welt, cuff, punch, smash
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘shake violently’): from Latin concuss- ‘dashed together, violently shaken’, from the verb concutere, from con- ‘together’ + quatere ‘shake’.

Pronunciation

concuss

/kənˈkəs//kənˈkəs/