Definition of concurrence in US English:

concurrence

(also concurrency)

noun

  • 1The fact of two or more events or circumstances happening or existing at the same time.

    ‘the incidental concurrence of two separate tumors’
    • ‘The two events of selection and difference of race ought to be distinguished in broad considerations, while the frequency of their concurrence is borne in mind.’
    • ‘Overemphasis on Salem's economic and religious struggles obscured the town's strategic location and the chronological concurrence of Indian and witch attacks.’
    • ‘Sometimes, mostly because of a concurrence of circumstances, things go wrong and an accident happens.’
    • ‘It is possible to map memory as a performative form, a set of concurrences that hover between original and copy, a theatrical source of creativity.’
    • ‘Three ecological pattern types stand out as particularly salient: concurrence in time, concurrence in both time and place, and sequential recurrence.’
    • ‘She exhumes the local and global conditions and concurrences of post-colonialism through the work of Cozier.’
    • ‘Despite this concurrence of nationalization and coal crisis, little attention has been focused on possible linkages between the two events.’
    • ‘One really only knows what is happening in the places where one has the knowledge of what concurrences exist and what they mean.’
    • ‘She raised an arm over her head, signaling the advance, and the trumpet blew in concurrence.’
    • ‘The concurrence of such events with Richard II's celebrative motif of English travel-heroics may be less than coincidental.’
    1. 1.1Mathematics A point at which three or more lines meet.
      ‘the number of possible concurrences in the diagram’
      • ‘Theorems on concurrence of lines, segments, or circles associated with triangles all deal with three or more objects passing through the same point.’
      • ‘Students will demonstrate their ability to reason by forming conjectures about the relationship of each point of concurrency with the triangle.’
      • ‘The true antecedent of the modern vanishing point is Guidobaldo's punctum concursus (point of concurrence).’
      • ‘This leads to the purely mathematical problem of finding the positions of the points of concurrence for various sets of parallels.’
      • ‘The orthocenter is one of the four concurrency points in a triangle.’
  • 2Agreement or consistency.

    ‘delays can be avoided by arriving at political concurrence at the start’
    ‘we want the concurrence of law enforcement’
    • ‘The president, with the general's concurrence, then expanded the war aims to unify the peninsula.’
    • ‘The only stab at a time frame can be found in the justice's concurrence.’
    • ‘This occurred completely outside of the academy's accounting systems, without the concurrence or knowledge of the finance department.’
    • ‘The new partnership was agreed last month without the concurrence of the state's farming organizations.’
    • ‘The assets are mortgaged in such a way that the mortgagor can deal with them without the concurrence of the mortgagee.’
    • ‘The summit urged the two countries to seek concurrence from other member countries for them to join the trade agreement by 2004.’
    • ‘In reliance on that agreement, they did, with the defendants' concurrence, perform services for the defendants.’
    • ‘The resolution to be proposed at this evening's meeting has my hearty concurrence.’
    • ‘The meeting may approve such a proposal or modification with the concurrence of the preferential creditor concerned.’
    • ‘Compliance is monitored by each state in concurrence with the federal agency.’

Pronunciation

concurrence

/kənˈkərəns//kənˈkərəns/