Definition of concretion in English:

concretion

Pronunciation /kənˈkrēSHən//ˌkänˈkrēSHən/

noun

  • 1A hard solid mass formed by the local accumulation of matter, especially within the body or within a mass of sediment.

    ‘a mass of small concretions, each built up layer upon layer around some small nucleus’
    • ‘At certain levels, carbonate-rich beds are present, inside which decimetre-scale hard calcareous concretions develop.’
    • ‘The authors show that early concretion growth prevented collapse and infilling of voids in the organisms, in the time-interval between organic decay and precipitation of calcite.’
    • ‘The barite and calcite form excellent euhedral crystals in concretions within the Cretaceous-age Mancos Shale.’
    • ‘Most specimens are contained in concretions and are preserved only because the concretions formed around them.’
    • ‘The biomineralized shells of trilobites, gastropods and brachiopods are preserved within the concretions.’
    • ‘Septarian concretions, some as much as 6 feet in diameter, occur in the Mancos Shale north of the town of Grand Junction where the land slopes upward toward the base of the Book Cliffs.’
    • ‘The mudstones are dark and contain calcareous concretions, the latter brecciated and with calcareous veins.’
    • ‘They sometimes are found together with dolostone concretions, barite nodules, or phosphatic nodules.’
    • ‘Coal balls are concretions of permineralized peat formed in place.’
    • ‘This spike has been previously regarded as diagenetic, as the samples analysed correspond to limestone concretions.’
    • ‘Large chert concretions appear 8 m above the base of the unit at Muller Canyon whereas at Reno Draw they do not appear until 18 m above the base.’
    • ‘To make matters worse, the concretions can be associated with cycads.’
    • ‘These are found rarely in large septarian concretions in the Huron Shale in north-central Ohio near Milan, in Huron County.’
    • ‘Preservation of non-biomineralized tissues within concretions occurs through most of the Phanerozoic, from the Upper Cambrian to the Recent.’
    • ‘Asbestos bodies are asbestos fibers that have been coated with an iron-rich, proteinaceous concretion.’
    • ‘Eventually, the sandstone slowly eroded away and the hard, erosion-resistant concretions were left on the ground.’
    • ‘Coal balls are a particular type of carbonate concretion that has been long known for the superb preservation of plant material.’
    • ‘Recently, one of us saw a bin of silicified barite concretion fragments in a Utah rock shop that were being sold as cycad specimens.’
    • ‘A nodule is a type of concretion with a rough and knobby surface.’
    • ‘The bodies of many smaller concretions are surrounded by a shell of fine-grained pyrite.’
    bodywork, hull, fuselage, outer casing
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The process by which matter forms into a concretion.
      • ‘These ground rules become privatized, and those who represent state security become complicit in their support, creating disorder and the absence of clear references for legitimacy and concretion for the general interest.’
      • ‘The point of such criticisms is not to recommend a ‘materialist’ poetics supposedly granting direct access to a realm of concretion undisturbed by concepts.’
      • ‘The areas along fault planes were subjected to a shearing action that produced a pattern of fracturing that is different from the desiccation cracking of a normal septarian concretion.’
      • ‘In Smithson's work, seriality involves not pure repetition or reiteration (he is not prone to setting up series of identical objects) but rather accretion, concretion, and diminution.’
      • ‘Strenuous efforts at concretion confront the inevitability of mutability.’
      • ‘The concern with material concretion begins with Bernstein's title, With Strings.’
      • ‘In its conception and concretion, the Otter Creek feeding facility was a monument to Horace Albright's philosophy of aesthetic conservation.’
      • ‘Taken together, they impart a kind of tenuous concretion to the vague concept of nationhood.’
      • ‘Yuki's face scrunched up in concretion.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin concretio(n-), from concrescere grow together.

Pronunciation

concretion

/kənˈkrēSHən//ˌkänˈkrēSHən/