Main definitions of concord in English

: Concord1Concord2

Concord1

proper noun

  • 1A city in north central California, northeast of Oakland; population 121,160 (est. 2008)

  • 2A town in northeastern Massachusetts; population 17,450 (est. 2008). Battles here and at Lexington in April 1775 marked the start of the American Revolution.

  • 3The capital of New Hampshire, in the southern part of the state, on the Merrimack River; population 42,255 (est. 2008)

  • 4An industrial city in south central North Carolina, a textile center; population 66,311 (est. 2008)

Main definitions of concord in English

: Concord1Concord2

Concord2

noun

  • A variety of dessert grape developed at Concord, Massachusetts.

    • ‘Somewhere over the last few days I also bought a few more plum trees (one of mine had died), a cherry tree, a green grape vine and a concord grape vine, which I'll plant this weekend.’
    • ‘Labruscana grapes, especially Concord, are also grown commercially, and some Muscadines are also produced.’
    • ‘Place three scoops of concord grape sorbet in the center of the dish.’
    • ‘Thoreau went graping in October to harvest delicious concord grapes.’
    • ‘However, Concord is definitely much more labrusca-like in its characteristics than vinifera-like.’

Main definitions of concord in English

: Concord1Concord2

concord

noun

  • 1formal Agreement or harmony between people or groups.

    ‘a pact of peace and concord’
    • ‘‘We Americans,’ President Harding has just said, ‘are united in the sweetest concord that ever united men.’’
    • ‘A move to Cyprus would be in concord with the current realignment of the US presence in Europe, from Germany to eastern Europe, while maintaining the primary focus of military operations on the Middle East.’
    • ‘Du Roullet and Gluck go further: the divinity arbitrarily revokes her wrath, to preserve the alliances and the concord among the Greeks.’
    • ‘Agreeing or disagreeing with particular policies is for private discussion, and perhaps public demonstration, but should not pollute the rituals of concord.’
    • ‘It's got chocolate biscuits, it's got charity, it's got concord, it's got a hero who's half the man he was.’
    • ‘Where humour and rational explanations do not produce concord about judicial activism, a parable may make the point.’
    • ‘The decision was motivated by the lack of cohesion and concord between the MPs of NMSII and the regional governors, State Administration Minister Dimitar Kalchev said.’
    • ‘On Sudan, are we not uplifted by the prospect of peace and concord between our brothers in that country?’
    • ‘Those were not moments of great concord, so I don't know how to answer for those decisions.’
    • ‘Scientific temper is his watchword, education his mission, communal concord his theme and tolerance his telling weapon.’
    • ‘United your resolve, united your hearts, may your spirits be at one, that you may long together dwell in unity and concord!’
    • ‘‘The purpose of religion as revealed from the heaven of God's holy Will is to establish unity and concord amongst the peoples of the world,’ Madison said.’
    • ‘The dancers, who appear in association with the bridal procession represented on the far left of the cityscape, are surely to be taken as signs of peace and concord.’
    • ‘And thus toleration produced not only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord.’
    • ‘He was now hoping for a rapprochement with Shia Iraqis, a concord that I think is unlikely.’
    • ‘It will be a government that will work by cohesion, concord and peace.’
    • ‘The common-sense centrists, the idealistic environmentalists and the blue-rinse wranglers had a rare moment of political concord.’
    • ‘The Spanish daily El Pais also said the commemorations provided ‘a moment of concord and relief ‘between Paris and Washington.’’
    • ‘Plato represents this position as one in which the soul's parts agree and are in harmony and concord.’
    • ‘In keeping with most instances of political ceremony and ritual, the new themes of universality, harmony, and concord were as much designed to conceal and mask political tension as they were genuine reflections of the papal vision.’
    agreement, harmony, accord, consensus, concurrence, unity, unanimity, unison, oneness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A treaty.
      • ‘The meeting to establish this concord between cross-border ‘friends’ is believed to have taken place in Murray's house and involved both men.’
      • ‘His marriage to Anne (his second cousin once removed) in 1683 sealed a diplomatic concord between their respective kingdoms against the Dutch.’
      • ‘Also while there is possibly a game to made about high level peace concords (press x to concede demands for territory. o to hold out for arms concessions) these are FPS, & therefore shooting kind of goes with the territory.’
      • ‘The Agreement is a political concord aimed at bringing to an end over a quarter of a century of bitter internal hostility in Northern Ireland.’
      • ‘The concord was proposed by the academics who form the so-called ‘track two’ of the ARF process, and also by Russia in the mid-1990s.’
      • ‘The two companies had regularly sniped at each other throughout their 30-year rivalry, but the 1992 concord was something of a sacred cow.’
      • ‘With the marine living resources concord completed, the Antarctic Treaty consultative parties looked to the need to regulate mining and oil-drilling.’
      • ‘Speculation regarding the probable attitude of the Harding Administration toward a peace concord of nations was revived today by a long conference between Elihu Root, former Secretary of State, and Senator Fall.’
      • ‘Zia's death did not necessarily mean Islamabad would abide by the American-Soviet / Russian concord to leave Afghanistan neutral and prostrate.’
      • ‘The concord represents a paradigm shift, and will accelerate regional integration and identity-building.’
      • ‘Highlighting the van Eyck brothers' role in a landmark concord between rival schools, Cornelius buries all reference to artisanal secrecy.’
      • ‘Unperturbed, he pressed ahead with a policy of reconciliation, drawing up a civil concord whereby armed groups would be amnestied if they laid down their arms.’
  • 2Grammar
    Agreement between words in gender, number, case, person, or any other grammatical category that affects the forms of the words.

    • ‘Notional concord stands in contrast to grammatical concord and means agreement by meaning rather than grammar, where the two are in conflict.’
    • ‘This article examines the historical evolution of subject - verb concord in New Zealand English.’
    • ‘Verbal affixes can further be divided into two subgroups: those that are part of verb concord, and those that are not.’
    • ‘The indicative verb form differs from the others in varying for tense and aspect, and in showing grammatical concord with the subject in the present tense.’
    • ‘It was a point of grammatical concord which was at the bottom of the Civil War - ‘United States are,’ said one, ‘United States is,’ said another.’
  • 3Music
    A chord that is pleasing or satisfactory in itself.

    • ‘Book 1 establishes the ratios of concords and melodic intervals, and divisions of tetrachords in each genus.’
    • ‘The programme also assumes that there is something prior to music, some experience ruling it: music's discords are as if distress, concords as if relief.’
    • ‘As you will know, the students of harmony make the same sort of mistake as the astronomers: they waste their time in measuring audible concords and sounds one against another…’
    • ‘On the words ‘No sense was stung’ the minim triads again banish the clumping quavers, though this time the triads are no simple concords, but a dominant seventh of E major followed by an F triad that is simultaneously major and minor.’
    • ‘A method of tuning in which some concords are made slightly impure so that few or none will be unpleasantly out of tune.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French concorde, from Latin concordia, from concors of one mind from con- together + cor, cord- heart.