Definition of conception in English:

conception

noun

  • 1The action of conceiving a child or of a child being conceived.

    ‘an unfertilized egg before conception’
    ‘a rise in premarital conceptions’
    • ‘To accept these proposals would mean we are prepared to forego the principle that life must be consistently protected from conception to birth and settle for a compromise.’
    • ‘You could also consider other forms of assisted conception such as egg donation or surrogacy.’
    • ‘I defy anyone to provide hard, real-life evidence which would contradict the details of Glen's conception and birth as depicted in these movies.’
    • ‘The potential number of muscle cells present at maturity is largely established genetically at conception, with their number completed by the time of birth.’
    • ‘After all, at conception, the fertilized egg has all the information necessary to code for your physical potential.’
    • ‘It is at the moment of conception that the genetic make-up of a child is established.’
    • ‘A great drama had surrounded my conception and birth.’
    • ‘I saw her deliver babies regularly, so the mysteries of sex and conception and birth were explained to me as far back as I can remember.’
    • ‘Abortion is the destruction of life after conception and before birth, whereas infanticide is the killing of new-born babies.’
    • ‘No one even knew about conception until recently.’
    • ‘From conception to birth, I am sure I caused pain.’
    • ‘Some of the man's sperm is put into the woman's womb at the same time as ovulation (the release of an egg), making conception more likely.’
    • ‘Defective mitochondria can slow down or prevent the growth of a fertilised egg, preventing conception.’
    • ‘It's only going to stop conception happening and conception can be prevented numerous other ways so it's not going to do anything to prevent sexual abuse.’
    • ‘The problem claiming the allowance stems from Grace's unusual conception and birth.’
    • ‘Their names did not appear on the birth certificate because conception had taken place after they died.’
    • ‘To argue against it is to, in essence, argue against any form of birth control, because birth control is preventing conception, which is what EC is doing.’
    • ‘The three main types of assisted conception are intrauterine insemination, in vitro fertilisation, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection.’
    • ‘In those instances where there is potential for fertilisation and conception to occur, a variety of technologies are available to overcome infertility.’
    • ‘Almost all of them bear a blue plaque detailing someone's birth, death or conception.’
    inception of pregnancy, conceiving, fertilization, impregnation, insemination
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  • 2The forming or devising of a plan or idea.

    ‘the time between a product's conception and its launch’
    • ‘An idea may depend upon another idea for its conception, and a body likewise on another body.’
    • ‘After all, they are the ones who have been living with the ideas, conception and finally the fruition of the game.’
    • ‘IK contributed to the study conception and design, analysis and interpretation of the data, and drafting the manuscript.’
    • ‘The new software allows the user to complete the entire Web animation process, from conception to the final product.’
    • ‘Still, this was no pet project for Lauder, whose role encompassed everything from idea conception to product development to marketing.’
    • ‘It analyses the visions which inspired reconstruction plans, examines their conception and studies the visionaries, both ordinary citizens and the political elite.’
    • ‘This Government believes in making the most of New Zealanders' new ideas by encouraging and supporting them from conception through development to commercialisation.’
    • ‘Assessment of circumstances and conception of plans springs from it.’
    • ‘He said: ‘The idea was in conception before September 11 and was not a reaction to it.’’
    • ‘In the commercial industry of publishing and stationary, there are often layers of opinion to hurdle in order to get an idea from conception to market.’
    • ‘Unless you are at the bottom or the pinnacle, it seems that us average designers do both conception and production.’
    • ‘I'm involved in the design of websites from conception through to building its contents right to the finished product.’
    • ‘The idea went into production reasonably quickly after conception.’
    • ‘From conception of the business idea to being up and running, how long did it take Anita to go from being in the red to being in the in the black?’
    • ‘Sources in Tata Motors has said that a minimum of three years was needed from conception to launch.’
    • ‘True PLM, according to Daratech, addresses product development from conception through end-of-life disposal.’
    • ‘Sensory analysis often provides the tools necessary to guide the product development process from conception through completion.’
    • ‘Julia Briggs brings to our attention this intriguing and essential part of Woolf's character by tracing the story of each of her major works from conception, via birth and growth, to completion.’
    • ‘It's a nice model for those who are also looking to move a product from conception to critical mass at minimal cost, while also ensuring that the critical mass produces a strong revenue stream down the track.’
    • ‘But that's the way with novelty productions: What seems like a brilliant idea in conception often proves to have very stubby legs in the real world.’
    inception, genesis, origination, creation, formation, formulation, invention
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    1. 2.1 The way in which something is perceived or regarded.
      ‘our conception of how language relates to reality’
      • ‘The first is the prelinguistic as an amorphous and syntactic matter, according to which a conception of language is based on the formation of this matter into substance.’
      • ‘To get to this, we will take a quick detour through a Hegelian conception of language.’
      • ‘As I said I think at the beginning, we are an unhealthy society in regard to our conceptions of aging.’
      • ‘The long and pronounced struggle of patriarchy against a feminist conception of society is clearly apparent in the debates over the female office clerk.’
      • ‘Perhaps we need richer conceptions of formation to accompany our convictions about education.’
      • ‘It's about people burnishing and polishing their self-images and their conceptions of how they're regarded by their fellow Man.’
      • ‘His research focuses on bilingualism and conceptions of language in language-minority education.’
      • ‘This debate cannot be settled here, but the issue involved is symptomatic of two very different conceptions of language and its importance for philosophy.’
      • ‘Nonetheless, each perspective defines hegemony with regard to different conceptions of agency.’
      • ‘Instead, feminist conceptions of objectivity are procedural.’
      • ‘Political leaders at both the provincial and federal levels had their own conceptions of language issues that were not entirely in line with the RCBB.’
      • ‘In a simple way, Ramakrishna was indicating that when you are dropping your conditioning, your mental conceptions, your beliefs, don't drop them one by one.’
      • ‘This preventative mental work, says Ekman, is different from Western conceptions of emotional control, where unpleasant emotions are considered almost inevitable.’
      • ‘The refusal of bourgeois conceptions of creativity constitutes a potential difficulty for any humanities subject.’
      • ‘Modern conceptions of emotions, as we have seen, have been frequently couched in terms of other mental terms.’
      • ‘Do these not include the expressive and deliberative interests people have in formulating their own conceptions of the good life?’
      • ‘The Queen Anne's Act was a brilliant and amazingly durable piece of lawmaking, requiring a sophisticated conception of what constitutes creative work or product of the mind.’
      • ‘We present here some of the cultural and religious issues influencing Somali conceptions and expectations about mental health services in an attempt to reduce barriers and difficulties.’
      • ‘But by enlisting machines to do what once was the creative province of human beings alone, we deliberately narrow our conceptions of genius, creativity, and art.’
      • ‘In its strong form, it argues that not only do different languages support different conceptions of reality, but that no ‘neutral’ conception of reality can be formed.’
      understanding, ability to understand, ability to imagine, comprehension, appreciation, knowledge, grasp, apprehension
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    2. 2.2 A general notion; an abstract idea.
      ‘the conception of a balance of power’
      • ‘We should realize that this reliance on precedent is not necessarily due to an abstract conception of ideal law, but also the result of the incentives faced by the judge.’
      • ‘A third conceptual account of authority or set of conceptions of legitimate authority involves the idea that the authority has a right to rule.’
      • ‘So that's where a theory or a conception of the imaginary and of the imagination which has traditionally been in the care of our artists, our writers, and so forth comes in.’
      • ‘Other fields of society such as education, the city and urban life, social solidarity, immigration, and the idea of progress and conceptions of the future also entered a new era.’
      • ‘The first is about what you called the second model regarding the cultural conception and idea of man.’
      • ‘Yau has chosen to use people with ‘normal’ body shapes to illuminate the fact that many of our conceptions of body images are unjustified.’
      • ‘Although not in so many words, no political theorist, Rihani largely subscribed to these propositions and to this conception of the political.’
      • ‘We have to have an ongoing, evolving, developing, strategic conception of what the situation is in the country, and the world.’
      • ‘Patterson reminds us that a long philosophical tradition situates intention in the realm of the idea or conception rather than the sphere of material execution.’
      • ‘They laid the basis for a scientific approach to human history by taking as their starting point not the ideas and conceptions of a given period, but the material conditions of life.’
      • ‘In 1957 he wrote an important article attacking the idea that the logical conception of probability could be a useful guide to the future.’
      • ‘You'll see ideas and conceptions that you cannot possibly imagine.’
      • ‘However, these are quite abstract conceptions, taken out of historical and social context.’
      • ‘With Version 2.1, IBM has removed some of the theories, hypotheticals and conceptions of SAN File System by moving past Windows and its own AIX operating system.’
      • ‘Two brief observations on the significance of folkbiology in considering the difference between children's and adults' perceptions and conceptions of nature should be made.’
      • ‘We may call this an unwarrantable and indeed incomprehensible leap from the abstract intellectual conceptions of mathematics to the solid realities of nature.’
      • ‘Premises of the life sciences need to be based on the traditional conceptions of such central ideas as soul and life pertaining to all living things.’
      • ‘His conception of theory is one in which it stands in a contemplative relation to the object, to which it is applied from the outside, practice being the result of this application.’
      • ‘We know that abstract conceptions such as ‘time’ and ‘flour’ can be hard to grasp for most people.’
      • ‘Adding these better conceptions of perceptual structure to some of the ideas mentioned at the end of this article, we might yet be able to get a bloom or two out of this topic.’
      idea, concept, notion, conceptualization, understanding, abstraction
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    3. 2.3 A plan or intention.
      ‘reconstructing Bach's original conceptions’
      • ‘When I left here you said you had a plan, you'd reached a new conception of your work, but it's amazing how things never change.’
      • ‘It's hard to imagine that his conception of staunch realism will bear any resemblance to that of Robert Bresson.’
      • ‘Starting out to be original, without any genuinely original conceptions… well, there is nothing new about that.’
      • ‘By kowtowing to the military's own conception of its ability to handle matters of justice, the government leaves the military free to do as it likes.’
      • ‘Some of the excitement over my lab's conception of automatically designed robots was the idea that we made a transition from the virtual world back to the real.’
      • ‘I said I'm interested in the big picture, and all that means is: I incorporate all the wild, wacky, distasteful and negative stuff into my ideas and conception about the internet.’
      • ‘This conception was developed further by Nietzsche, the idea of the Dionysian cult.’
      • ‘NATO is no longer ‘the primary place where transatlantic partners consult and coordinate their strategic conceptions.’’
      • ‘‘A good screenplay is a film-maker's detailed conception of the product,’ he said.’
      • ‘Such unwitting similarity to Boyd's conception of strategic paralysis suggests that Owens's variant possesses the same weaknesses.’
      • ‘In this recent revision, Beck proposed a new conception for the structure and processes involved in psychopathology.’
      • ‘Bold in his strategic conceptions, McClellan nevertheless dreaded the actual execution of his plans.’
      • ‘To prize autonomy is to respect the conception of others, to weigh their plans for themselves heavily in deciding what is good for them: but children do not start out with plans or conceptions.’
      • ‘His plans were bold and fiery, and his conceptions glowed with barbaric lustre.’
      • ‘If you aren't familiar with it, it's one of the few pieces of literature that I would argue proceeds from a design conception.’
      • ‘Despite these changes, the basic conception of the plan was unchanged.’
      plan, scheme, project, proposal, proposition, design, outline
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    4. 2.4 Understanding; ability to imagine.
      ‘he had no conception of politics’
      • ‘When I got out of college, I had no conception of failing.’
      • ‘Carrie was clearly in the wrong over Aleksander; she just evidently shouldn't have been with him because she has almost no conception of being creative, or even sympathy.’
      • ‘That is why I think this is such an artificial foundation for deriving a rule nowadays from a case that had no conception of the Internet.’
      • ‘This deeply pained my friends, not because they particularly loved America, but because the activists had no conception of Iraq's suffering under the dictator.’
      • ‘No part of his breakfast had been brought from the other side of the world; and it is quite probable, he had no conception of the world having any other side.’
      • ‘Like most Australians, I had no conception of where these places were, other than ‘somewhere vaguely north of London’.’
      • ‘The early mercantilists had no conception of the business cycle.’
      • ‘The idiot potter who made it had no conception of the true power of words and what they can do.’
      • ‘Most of these children had no conception of art, and little previous experience of being creative.’
      • ‘At the anthropological level, Heidegger's philosophy consequently undermines any claim to universalism and any conception of man as a "substantial" being.’
      • ‘I answered as best I could, but I didn't have the vocabulary to describe things he had no conception of.’
      • ‘Most people don't think about where their ideas come from, and don't have the slightest conception of ideas like ‘context.’’
      • ‘The common throng had no conception of his problems; all of them thought being a dictator was the end-all.’
      • ‘But apart from that, I had no conception of my life.’
      • ‘They had no conception of the depth of trauma suffered.’
      • ‘And yet when Mr Braithwaite built his first sports boat back in the 1960s, he had no conception of how the company would turn out.’
      • ‘It is submitted, therefore, it must follow, as a matter of common understanding and general conception, that there are two subjects of taxation.’
      • ‘But I had to explain to her what that meant because she had no conception of what Sundance was.’
      understanding, ability to understand, ability to imagine, comprehension, appreciation, knowledge, grasp, apprehension
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Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin conceptio(n-), from the verb concipere (see conceive).

Pronunciation

conception

/kənˈsɛpʃ(ə)n//kənˈsepSH(ə)n/