Main definitions of con in English

: con1con2

con1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • Persuade (someone) to do or believe something, typically by use of a deception.

    ‘I conned him into giving me your home number’
    ‘she was jailed for conning her aunt out of $500,000’
    • ‘It's certainly totally immoral to con people that they have a psychic connection when there is none.’
    • ‘Most of these reports were of tourists being conned or swindled.’
    • ‘His exceptional skills at grifting combined with his good looks have allowed him to believe that he can con anybody.’
    • ‘Today, she is starting three-and-a-half years behind bars for her latest deceptions, plus six months for trying to con the judge into believing a fish and chip shop was a hospital.’
    • ‘He couldn't believe that he had let Frankie con him into believing him.’
    • ‘He managed to con people into believing he was an airline pilot, a lawyer and a doctor.’
    • ‘Telephone fraudsters are being foiled in their attempts to con people out of hundreds of pounds.’
    • ‘Governments only need to spend millions of dollars trying to con us into believing that they've done a good job if they haven't.’
    • ‘He is charged with sending spam emails which conned people into believing that they had won millions of dollars in overseas lotteries, or inheritance, or through a business opportunity.’
    • ‘Since the beginning of June there have been 39 burglaries in which thieves have conned their way into homes.’
    • ‘We allow criminals who have stolen or conned people out of their money to retain their assets even though the property that they have taken has not been recovered.’
    • ‘What happened is some very smart people got conned by the little office conman, and that's what this kid turns out to be.’
    • ‘‘Up is down, and down is up… My feeling is that someone has essentially conned her into believing that she's going to be voting,’ he said.’
    • ‘The Internet giant has taken almost two weeks to respond to allegations of a scam designed to con its users out of £199.’
    • ‘Police believe the man conned his way into the 41-year-old victim's house by offering to do building work.’
    • ‘According to Jevans, it is hard to know how many people are conned by phishing scams.’
    • ‘Also, the trailers and TV ads are conning us into believing that it's about a talking kangaroo.’
    • ‘They con the girls into believing they are about to make it onto the front page of every magazine.’
    • ‘It works the first time, causing the person being conned to believe that the rest of the notes will be cleaned and thus yield a fortune.’
    • ‘Other crimes involve impersonating international police investigators, snatching purses, and gangs conning tourists into the ever-popular ‘black money scam’.’

Origin

Late 19th century (originally US): abbreviation of confidence, as in confidence trick.

Pronunciation:

con

/kän/

Main definitions of con in English

: con1con2

con2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Archaic
  • Study attentively or learn by heart (a piece of writing)

    ‘the girls conned their pages with a great show of industry’
    • ‘"Set in a notebook, learned & conned by rote" From Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare.’
    • ‘Anyone who does know something about it is more likely to have acquired that knowledge in bits by conning books (however carefully) or taking a few workshops on weekends or for a week in the summer.’
    • ‘We hope to show that a logic-based learning method can be applied to less conned learning tasks.’

Origin

Middle English cunne, conne, con, variants of can.

Pronunciation:

con

/kän/