Definition of commendation in English:

commendation

noun

  • 1Praise.

    ‘the film deserved the highest commendation’
    ‘commendations for their kindness’
    • ‘The Minister may well commend the report, but I cannot support his commendation.’
    • ‘Many braved the cold water for the first time; and they deserve particular credit and commendation.’
    • ‘There are men who crave the approval and commendation of those in positions of authority.’
    • ‘In a proper case I do not consider that that is a ground for criticism but for commendation.’
    • ‘Either way, they are very good at it, and deserve commendation for a job well done.’
    • ‘However, all the women deserve commendation for playing well against more experienced opposition.’
    • ‘This was a richly deserved commendation and Helen can be proud of her performance.’
    • ‘And Ross himself deserves special commendation for producing such a revealing record of these efforts.’
    • ‘This is no mean achievement, but one deserving due commendation.’
    • ‘As a community we owe these workers a huge thank you and commendation.’
    • ‘Still, someone who can and does stand up to those who are twice his size deserve commendation and reward.’
    • ‘The cinematic look of the film deserves commendation alone and the director is a talent to look out for.’
    • ‘They deserve commendation and much thanks, especially as their work is all of a voluntary nature.’
    • ‘‘Surely, this is good development by all standards and Government deserves commendation for facilitating it,’ Mr Mubanga said.’
    • ‘I will list it if somebody else writes to commend it, and I agree with their commendation.’
    • ‘The direction deserves commendation as do all the actors.’
    • ‘As a supporter of all that's low-key, I think the curators deserve commendation for this.’
    • ‘He should be getting letters of commendation, not threats.’
    • ‘His selfless actions are deserving of the highest commendation.’
    • ‘Jenny deserves commendation for her involvement with this very worthy cause.’
    praise, congratulation, appreciation, thanks
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1An award involving special praise.
      ‘the detectives received commendations for bravery’
      • ‘A Royal Marine who showed ‘outstanding courage’ in disposing of a live mortar shell on the remote island of St Helena has been awarded a commendation from the Second Sea Lord.’
      • ‘Two staff members received commendations for their bravery in extricating a youth from serious violence, while at the same taking several other youths to court hearings.’
      • ‘Many of these soldiers received commendations for bravery.’
      • ‘Chef Dane Turner is to receive a bravery commendation after wrestling a drunken, gun-wielding man to the floor of his kitchen.’
      • ‘The commendations awarded to his officers publicly recognise that they have not only met these challenges but surpassed expectations.’
      • ‘He said the four pensioners acted with incredible bravery and deserved certificates of commendation from the court.’
      • ‘Loudon was awarded with a commendation for his bravery just over a week ago, after he jumped into the sea to help a man in November.’
      • ‘He had received regular commendations for his performance both from the car manufacturers and customers.’
      • ‘Afterwards, Mr Appleby, who was awarded a police commendation for tackling a gang of teenagers when he was 68, said he was astonished at the way he had been treated.’
      • ‘The widow of a North Yorkshire policeman killed in a road accident proudly received a commendation for her husband's bravery in arresting an armed burglar.’
      • ‘An officer who plunged into the surf to save a drowning sailor has been awarded a commendation for his bravery.’
      • ‘This becomes an accomplishment that deserves commendation.’
      • ‘I think Rick Wallace deserves some sort of commendation for bringing attention to this serious security oversight.’
      • ‘The officer was awarded a commendation for his courage and bravery after saving a man who jumped on to the rail tracks.’
      • ‘The commendations are awarded for those who go beyond the call of duty to make the railway a safer environment.’
      • ‘Ten West Yorkshire firefighters will receive commendations for bravery after rescuing a three-year-old boy.’
      • ‘Her awards and commendations went up on the wall, along with a few photos.’
      • ‘A local police officer has been awarded a commendation for bravery after wrestling a gun from a man in a casino last April.’
      • ‘It deserves all the awards and commendations it has received in the past year.’
      • ‘He spoke of Mr Miller's bravery and how he received a commendation for his part in the rescue of three people trapped in a burning building.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Latin commendatio(n-), from commendare commit to the care of (see commend). Originally (in the plural) the term denoted a liturgical office ending with a prayer commending the souls of the dead to God.

Pronunciation:

commendation

/ˌkämənˈdāSH(ə)n/