Definition of comic in English:

comic

adjective

  • 1Causing or meant to cause laughter.

    ‘comic and fantastic exaggeration’
    • ‘It's both funny and sad, but thanks to the poet's excellent comic timing, it's mostly funny.’
    • ‘The songs also allow each character to unveil her inner life, as a sort of monologue both moving and comic.’
    • ‘It's an indulgent fantasy, saved by Chow's precise comic timing and the preposterous action sequences.’
    • ‘I couldn't tell if he was offended or joking, but I was leaning towards the comic side.’
    • ‘It is a high-wire act of comic absurdity with a safety net of sentimentality.’
    • ‘Although this astonishing horse never sets hoof on stage, it looms large in the mind's eye, thanks to this stand-up comic monologue.’
    • ‘It's a hilarious film full of gems of comic absurdity that are mixed in with nonchalant understatement.’
    • ‘He knows what funny is, and can do comic timing, given a script.’
    • ‘Not unless he is simply to reacting to the comic timing instead of the core of the joke, which is possible.’
    • ‘There seems to be an unwritten law that football songs should be comic or humorous, or at least not too serious.’
    • ‘Grint's got fantastic comic timing and knows exactly how far to take it, often stealing a scene with nothing more than a look.’
    • ‘In the latter, it was somewhat hard to connect to the characters, who often seemed exaggerated for comic effect.’
    • ‘You are witty, have great comic timing and a fantastic accent.’
    • ‘The actors give convincing and entertaining performances with great comic pitch and timing.’
    • ‘On stage, with her impeccable comic timing, she is very funny.’
    • ‘Is this a smear, or is she merely exaggerating for comic effect, I wonder?’
    • ‘These elements, coupled with some spot-on comic timing are side-splitting to behold.’
    • ‘Some messages are genuinely funny, others unintentionally comic.’
    • ‘For comic effect it has a character whose supposedly hilarious weakness is to use phrases that have gone out of fashion.’
    • ‘Fast-paced comic fun, with a strong whiff of circus slapstick, for the discerning younger viewer.’
    humorous, funny, droll, amusing, entertaining, diverting, absurd, ridiculous, comical, chucklesome, farcical, silly, slapstick, hilarious, uproarious, hysterical, hysterically funny, zany
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    1. 1.1 Relating to or in the style of comedy.
      ‘a comic actor’
      ‘comic drama’
      • ‘His exploits make for comic entertainment on these increasingly cold nights in.’
      • ‘I knew I had sort of a comic talent, comic timing, and I wanted to be a comic actor.’
      • ‘A second later Val and Sam jumped out in laughter, as though they were the cleverest comic geniuses.’
      • ‘During the day fancy dress competitions were held, bowling and tennis tournaments and entertainment from several comic bands.’
      • ‘However she baulks at the suggestion that the picture will be a comic drama.’
      • ‘This is the theatrical ambition of every comic actor who dreams of going beyond comedy to tragedy.’
      • ‘Not pointing any finger but as a comic actor used to say ‘I only asked’.’
      • ‘It is such sheer joy to watch someone like Sandler enhance his skill as a comic actor.’
      • ‘You do not need to be a great comic writer to give written or spoken communication a humorous edge.’
      • ‘It is a unique mix of comedy characters and comic sketches spiced up by a team of the best oriental writers and performers.’
      • ‘He is a witty, engaging presence in the early comic scenes, portraying the doctor with soft-spoken befuddlement.’
      • ‘They're also frequently funny, though the comic scenes are almost invariably laced with tragedy or fear.’
      • ‘It may have been written in a comic style, but it's hardly the barrel of laughs the reviewers make it out to be.’
      • ‘In Dawn, we finally - and it was about time - have a British comic heroine who is not idiotically silly.’
      • ‘He has inherited his father's comic style, low key and thoroughly decent.’
      • ‘That's the difference between comic drama and corporate motivation.’
      • ‘It's a darkly comic drama, which makes you wonder how they get away with it.’
      • ‘These four issues are some of the best mainstream comic entertainment I have read.’
      • ‘Roadside entertainment involved a man in a comic mask, walking around and fooling bystanders.’
      • ‘This cheapens and degrades the movie and insults the current style of the comic franchise.’

noun

  • 1A comedian, especially a professional one.

    ‘a stand-up comic’
    • ‘Obviously a comic needs a spontaneous funny side to them, but there's a technical side as well.’
    • ‘These stand-up comics make a living performing at Comedy Clubs.’
    • ‘Jim is a lot more entertaining to me as a comic than as an actor.’
    • ‘Comedians have voted the late Peter Cook the greatest comic of all time.’
    • ‘Milton Berle told me once comics make good actors because they're acting all the time.’
    • ‘Kay also brought in some comics he had met on the stand-up circuit.’
    • ‘As a stand-up comic, MacAulay has a rare gift - he can put his audience at ease and mercilessly ridicule them at the same time.’
    • ‘Half of the work for a stand-up comic is actually the willingness to put yourself out there and give it a shot.’
    • ‘Sara is a writer and stand-up comic who works quite happily in San Francisco, thank you very much.’
    • ‘But I did arrive at a point in my life where I realized I would not be a huge stand-up comic.’
    • ‘It's like when you go to a comedy club, and the less experienced comics get up and start pulling out the lewd jokes.’
    • ‘The Liverpool comic and impressionist cancelled his Grand Opera House show only 90 minutes before it was due to start.’
    • ‘By night he's a singer and stand-up comic who uses bad language and tackles controversial social issues.’
    • ‘And we want to do it with laughter, concentrating on what comics do best - communicate.’
    • ‘At its worst, it's like a humorless stand-up comic's miserable childhood routine.’
    • ‘My grandfather was a clergyman in the Church of England and he was one of the funniest stand-up comics I ever met.’
    • ‘We sat laughing and gasping in awe at the writing, the delivery and the sheer brilliance of Britain's best stand-up comic.’
    • ‘The comic had risen through the stand-up ranks, working hard at developing an act after his initial performances drew derision.’
    • ‘Not being as funny as they once were is what every comic dreads.’
    • ‘Grantham, an occasional amateur stand-up comic, wants people to laugh along.’
    comedian, comedienne, funny man, funny woman, comedy actor, comedy actress, humorist, wit, wag, quipster
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  • 2comicsNorth American Comic strips.

    • ‘Transparencies were made of the cartoons and comics to share with students.’
    • ‘Satrapi illustrates her comics in a simple style, but don't let that fool you.’
    • ‘We loaded the car up with snacks, comics, some storybooks and a selection of toys in order to keep up Zachery's interest.’
    • ‘Born in New York in 1923, Roy drew much of his inspiration from advertisements, comics and cartoons.’
    • ‘The style of production of independents who work on their own comics tends to differ from that of their contract work.’
    • ‘He was not the caricature that cartoonists and comics had created.’
    • ‘I stared at the pink walls covered in horse posters, sketches, and drawn comics.’
    • ‘Actually she's been doing mostly comics and hadn't done actual drawing for years.’
    • ‘Sam sat at the rickety old table, sipping a cup of coffee and skimming through the comics in the daily paper.’
    • ‘How on earth can the most truthful thing in the newspaper be the comics?’
    • ‘They draw comics of their favourite cartoon shows, and make a bundle at it.’
    • ‘Drawing comics for a living would appear to be a dream come true, but it has the unfortunate side effect of transforming leisure into work.’
    • ‘However, I try to take 15 minutes each day to read the daily comics in the newspaper.’
    • ‘Drama and comics are also used to help students better understand the some of the more complex concepts.’
    cartoon paper, comic paper, funny magazine, comic book, graphic novel
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Origin

Late 16th century: via Latin from Greek kōmikos, from kōmos ‘revel’.

Pronunciation

comic

/ˈkɑmɪk//ˈkämik/