Definition of come to a head in US English:

come to a head

phrase

  • 1Reach a crisis.

    ‘the violence came to a head with the deaths of six youths’
    • ‘The situation came to a head in Liverpool in similar circumstances to the crisis which has now arisen in Glasgow - with money the central problem.’
    • ‘That situation came to a head and reached a crisis point in August of that year.’
    • ‘The club's financial crisis came to a head in February when it narrowly avoided going into administration.’
    • ‘The fiscal demands of the military were added to a long-term inflation of currency that came to a head during the crisis.’
    • ‘History suggests that crises need to come to a head before we start to make hard changes - try to imagine passing the New Deal in 1928.’
    • ‘The extent of the funding crisis came to a head when school budgets finalised in March were not enough to cover rising costs in the new financial year.’
    • ‘By late summer 1923 the crisis was coming to a head.’
    • ‘This crisis may have come to a head with the collapse of the socialist camp but its origins lie in the emergence of a modern capitalist order capable of accommodating itself rapidly to changes in the forces of production.’
    • ‘The intense violence came to a head at the weekend as hundreds of rioters pelted police with petrol bombs, blast bombs, rocks and bottles.’
    • ‘This came to a head in 1979 when the violence really began in earnest.’
    reach a crisis, come to a climax, reach a critical point, reach a turning point, reach a crossroads
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Suppurate; fester.
      ‘abscesses should be allowed to come to a head’