Definition of come of age in US English:

come of age

phrase

  • 1(of a person) reach adult status.

    • ‘Children who come of age and have not gone through the puberty rite are liable to be forcibly seized to undergo the procedure.’
    • ‘Young people coming of age imbibed this political atmosphere, for the most part unconsciously.’
    • ‘Many human societies have tested young people coming of age with a quest or trial that tests the candidate's physical and mental skills and endurance.’
    • ‘Teens and young adults will come of age taking the Internet for granted, as their parents did television, as their grandparents did telephones.’
    • ‘This is a ceremony which marks the coming of age for pubescent youngsters.’
    • ‘For young people coming of age now I think it's particularly sad, because I feel like I had it just 10 years ago.’
    • ‘Adolescent Development and Rapid Social Change addresses the psychological consequences for these young people who came of age during a time of such uncertainty.’
    • ‘He faced the prospect of losing his position, and might be motivated to ensure his long-term power and status beyond the point of the rightful monarch coming of age.’
    • ‘Joly came of age in the liberating turmoil of the 1960s in France, but her story was one of ambition rather than anarchy.’
    • ‘They shared the overriding objective of preserving for the time he came of age the inheritances won by his grandfather and father in England and France.’
    • ‘The theme evokes the acute anxieties, those of the kids portrayed and those of the responsible adults, that attend coming of age.’
    • ‘Young people mark their coming of age in different ceremonies or initiations.’
    • ‘Many of the Chicano texts appropriate or written for young adults feature males coming of age.’
    • ‘This ‘glorious, loving celebration’ follows young people as they come of age and prepare to enter the real world.’
    • ‘Adolescent boys and girls came of age by engaging in tribal rituals suited to their future adult roles.’
    • ‘It is understood that the two young people are to marry as soon as Edwin comes of age, although this very understanding has been fatal to love between them.’
    • ‘Many of these are young people who had not yet come of age at the time of the previous elections.’
    • ‘These people are the adults of tomorrow and are coming of age.’
    • ‘The key to Hong Kong's emergence was its status as a free port at the edge of China, but the emergence of a national identity dates to the early 1970s, when a generation of young people born and raised in Hong Kong came of age.’
    1. 1.1 (of a movement or activity) become fully established.
      ‘space travel will then finally come of age’
      • ‘I guess, finally, India is coming of age; at least the urban part of it, and given some time, rural India will also catch up.’
      • ‘This momentous shift has combined with the coming of age of human rights advocacy from the grass roots in Western countries.’
      • ‘It will ensure that the judiciary comes of age and takes on responsibility for those features of the relationship that are critical to its future well-being.’
      • ‘For the movement which came of age in Seattle, the World Bank and the West Bank belong to the same political territory.’
      • ‘But they saw that book publishing had finally come of age in India, and they felt that a good review journal would serve to bring ‘book and reader together’.’
      • ‘As evidenced from the undeniable success of tonight's event, the movement has come of age.’
      • ‘A marginal movement has come of age, spawning a whole generation of human-rights advocates who are turning sex workers into a mainstream cause.’
      • ‘The Supreme Court Bill provides for New Zealand's final court of appeal to be located in New Zealand, and marks the coming of age of New Zealand's judicial system.’
      • ‘Now the movement has come of age and deserves greater recognition.’
      • ‘Yes, by all indications it appears sandboarding has finally come of age.’
      • ‘After the birth pangs of the 1970s and 1980s, the gay movement had finally come of age, and I was proud to identify myself as a fully participating member of that community.’
      • ‘This exhibition simultaneously marks the coming of age of video art and honours Viola's status as a master of the medium.’
      • ‘Once a bastion for socialist thinking, the open source community is finally coming of age.’
      • ‘Or is this a sign that opinion polling in India is finally coming of age?’
      • ‘Soyinka insists the day Africa is able to sort out its leadership vacuum is the day the continent will finally come of age.’
      • ‘Socially responsible investing has finally come of age.’
      • ‘The new technology, coupled with more visionary architectural design, allowed America to finally come of age in the development of a distinctly American style.’
      • ‘Science and technology came of age fully during WW I, when nations threw all their intellectual and productive energy at each other.’
      • ‘The anti-globalisation movement has perhaps come of age - not on the streets of Seattle or London, but on the streets of Gaza, the West Bank and, soon, Baghdad.’
      • ‘The author suggests that by summer 1998 there had been a turning point, and a more confident Commission had come of age.’