Definition of come into line in US English:

come into line

phrase

  • Conform.

    ‘Britain has come into line with other Western democracies in giving the vote to its citizens living abroad’
    • ‘The move was motivated by the need to come into line with European Union expectations regarding energy prices, global fuel prices, and to reduce losses by the national oil and gas company.’
    • ‘This is in spite of government pressure for the university to come into line with other universities which charge overseas students higher fees.’
    • ‘This year Ontario comes into line with most of the rest of North America in transforming a typical high school diploma into a four-year process.’
    • ‘The other 220 owners have agreed to sell, but the deal may not work if the others don't come into line.’
    • ‘It will also mean that your home will come into line with the latest building regulations.’
    • ‘The California Nurses Association charges that the corporation is refusing to come into line with industry standards over issues such as staffing, pensions and retiree health benefits.’
    • ‘‘I think that the regulator will be insisting that all drivers come into line with the kind of standards we have set,’ he said.’
    • ‘An FA spokesman confirmed yesterday that English football was likely to come into line with the rest of the world next season.’
    • ‘Qantas remains quietly confident that after some initial huffing and puffing, and even some limited protests, all unions will come into line.’
    • ‘The whole issue of software patents recently came up in Europe as the EU debated whether to change its laws in order to come into line with the US and Japan.’