Definition of color-blind in English:


(also colorblind)


  • 1Unable to distinguish certain colors, or (rarely in humans) any colors at all.

    • ‘A doctor of my acquaintance did not realise that he was colour-blind until he attempted to fail aircraft pilots in the RAF on colour vision tests.’
    • ‘Nocturnal species can discriminate flowers at starlight intensities when humans and honeybees are colour-blind.’
    • ‘He wanted to be a fighter pilot but failed the medical because the man with the bluest eyes in cinema is colour-blind.’
    • ‘‘He may be colour-blind,’ my doctor thought out loud.’
    • ‘Bulls are colour-blind, so it is yet another myth that they are enraged by red shades; they react only to the fervent cape-waving.’
    • ‘I'm red-green color-blind; I couldn't see the laser sights on the fixed turrets well enough to actually dodge them.’
    • ‘Also, I'm colour-blind, which got us in a lot of trouble.’
    • ‘The two colours of the discs were green and red - Adam is partially colour-blind, and guess which two colours he can't tell the difference between?’
    • ‘And sound was perhaps a more important component of that image than vision, colour-blind and short-sighted as he was.’
    • ‘Now you have to understand, my dad not only waited till the last minute to make me a costume, but was also acutely colour-blind, with the worst creative sense I've ever seen.’
    • ‘The suits are distinguished only by colour, so the cards may be difficult for colour-blind players to use.’
    • ‘People can be born color-blind, or they may develop the condition over time. The most common form of color blindness is an inherited condition that affects boys much more often than girls.’
    • ‘I mean, a colour-blind person doesn't know that he's missing a few shades unless he does the tests.’
  • 2Not influenced by racial prejudice.

    ‘a color-blind society’
    • ‘He believes that only ending racial categorizations will lead to a color-blind society where people aren't seen through the lens of race.’
    • ‘Too bad they ignore that phenomenon while they style themselves as advocates of a color-blind American society.’
    • ‘A degree of short-term separateness and colour-consciousness is needed to achieve the long-term goal of an integrated and colour-blind society.’
    • ‘I've heard people say that every mixed person is one step closer to a color-blind society.’
    • ‘After more than 30 years of work on the psychology of racism and antiracism, I continue to be mystified by how difficult it is for many to see the falsehoods of the color-blind society.’
    • ‘Even as some Americans hold up the ideal of a color-blind society, research reveals that pejorative racial stereotyping and subconscious negative racial bias persist among white Americans.’
    • ‘Native students can be helped through a colour-blind policy that takes into account the problems they are most likely to face.’
    • ‘Like most liberals, he has no vision of a color-blind society and nothing to offer African Americans other than permanent entitlement programs.’
    • ‘Capitalism is colour-blind and gender-blind, and does not discriminate based on religious belief or sexual orientation.’
    • ‘A half-century ago, Southern Democrats campaigned by opposing color-blind laws, stirring up racial fears, and silencing those who opposed them.’
    • ‘We should become a colour-blind society.’
    • ‘The vast, vast majority of conservatives today believe fervently in King's ideal of a color-blind society.’
    • ‘Connerly believes that if the state stops gathering data on race, ethnicity and ancestry, California will become a more color-blind society.’
    • ‘All of the people in this documentary are strong: not only are they African-Canadians living in a society that likes to pretend it is colour-blind, they are gay and they dress up as women for a living.’
    • ‘The political ideology of the Reagan Administration reflected a desire to move towards a color-blind society in which race was a neutral issue in public policy formulation.’
    • ‘Clearly he was saying that, as we seek a color-blind society, we must make up for what we have done to those of color.’
    • ‘Someday, we hope, the idea of a diversity program will be seen as a quaint and unnecessary vestige because we will have become the color-blind society of Martin Luther King's famous dream.’
    • ‘Still, as long as the agreements existed and were enforceable in American courts, they were an insult to the concept of a color-blind society, and a burr in the side of many upwardly mobile African Americans.’