Definition of collide in US English:

collide

verb

[no object]
  • 1Hit with force when moving.

    ‘she collided with someone’
    ‘two suburban trains collided’
    • ‘Their call follows an accident in Welling when a bus collided with a van which was turning left across the bus lane.’
    • ‘It was the only time in recorded history that our planet may have collided with a huge celestial object.’
    • ‘I had survived; I hadn't hit anyone or anything and nobody had collided with me.’
    • ‘In May two trains collided and derailed near the station during the morning rush-hour.’
    • ‘Another train wreck today: California freight train collided with a passenger train.’
    • ‘As the ball fell, a pair of opposing players jumped together, collided and missed it.’
    • ‘There were more accidents, more trucks, which had collided with trees, culverts, or run off the road.’
    • ‘A youth was killed when a passenger train collided with his car on a level crossing in East Yorkshire last night.’
    • ‘The accident happened when the Corsa collided with a blue Ford Escort as both vehicles travelled towards Haxby.’
    • ‘Later in the afternoon, at 5.40 pm, a two vehicle accident saw cars colliding on the Hatston Brae after slipping on snow.’
    • ‘Officers were told Richardson's car had mounted the kerb and it had been swerving before it collided with a lamppost.’
    • ‘He unwittingly collides with the toughest star player on the opposing team and is knocked unconscious, along with his gigantic opponent.’
    • ‘Six students were injured in Casino on Wednesday morning when their school bus collided with a car.’
    • ‘Having split apart, the continents eventually started to collide with each other, and their different groups of mammals started to mix.’
    • ‘It collided with the jug, sending it toppling over and crashing onto the polished tiles.’
    • ‘The car was shunted backwards by the force of the impact and collided with the black Ford Fiesta directly behind it.’
    • ‘Wallace collided with three other bikes at Wheeler's Corner at the Dundrod Circuit in Co Antrim.’
    • ‘Put simply, if a moving atom collides with a photon coming in the opposite direction with the appropriate energy, the atom will be knocked back and slowed down.’
    • ‘He braked but the vehicle would not stop and they collided with the wall.’
    • ‘He collided with a shelf holding computer parts and knocked some to the floor with a clatter.’
    crash, crash into, come into collision, come into collision with, bang, bang into, slam, slam into, impact, impact with
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Come into conflict or opposition.
      ‘in his work, politics and metaphysics collide’
      • ‘Between those two opposing views, ideals collide and friendships are strained.’
      • ‘L knows full well that the abject takes on a very different meaning when it collides with our stereotypes of the black underclass.’
      • ‘I think politics is intrinsically about idealism colliding with raw power.’
      • ‘Different dance worlds collide at Tangente's Majors series this weekend.’
      • ‘The play shows political paranoia colliding with greed and ambition.’
      • ‘As our collective anger collides head-on with our political system's intransigence, we're stuck with a classic case of an irresistible force meeting an immovable object.’
      • ‘We might find out that we have been part of different worlds with colliding interests - scientific and political.’
      • ‘Postrel's book provides us with two very different worlds colliding with each other.’
      • ‘Four seismic forces will soon collide to test the president's true political acumen.’
      • ‘When those two forces collide, Japanese politics will at long last change.’
      • ‘Instead of which, the more Romantic orchestral playing collided with the period style of the choir and soloists.’
      • ‘When the personal collides with the political, someone is bound to get panned.’
      • ‘It's when the love story collides with the subplot that conflict arises.’
      • ‘It is a place where history and people and power and politics collide in ways that touch the lives of every American.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, basic contract principles collide with his request for damages.’
      • ‘We have different styles, different topics spark our interest and while our views do collide, we rarely arrive at them from the same direction.’
      • ‘The two worlds are colliding in an age-old clash that is causing some to wonder how long this great thing will last.’
      • ‘But when devotion to principle collides with electoral politics, hard truths must be faced.’
      • ‘What is being made visible here is the fault-line where corporate culture collides with democratic politics.’
      • ‘The students and lecturers all have different motives for being there and these collide with painful consequences.’
      conflict, be in conflict, come into conflict, be in opposition, clash, differ, diverge, disagree, be at variance, be at odds, be incompatible
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century (in the sense ‘cause to collide’): from Latin collidere, from col- ‘together’ + laedere ‘to strike’.

Pronunciation

collide

/kəˈlaɪd//kəˈlīd/